Immunohistochemical analyses on two distinct internodes of stinging nettle show different distribution of polysaccharides and proteins in the cell walls of bast fibers

Immunohistochemical analyses on two distinct internodes of stinging nettle show different distribution of polysaccharides and proteins in the cell walls of bast fibers

Protoplasma. 2021 Apr 10. doi: 10.1007/s00709-021-01641-1. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

Stinging nettle is a perennial herbaceous species holding value as a multi-purpose plant. Indeed, its leaves and roots are phytofactories providing functional ingredients of medicinal interest and its stems produce silky and resistant extraxylary fibers (a.k.a. bast fibers) valued in the biocomposite sector. Similarly to what is reported in other fiber crops, the stem of nettle contains both lignified and hypolignified fibers in the core and cortex, respectively, and it is therefore a useful model for cell wall research. Indeed, data on nettle stem tissues can be compared to those obtained in other models, such as hemp and flax, to support hypotheses on the differentiation and development of bast fibers. The suitability of the nettle stem as model for cell wall-related research was already validated using a transcriptomics and biochemical approach focused on internodes at different developmental stages sampled at the top, middle, and bottom of the stem. We here sought to complement and enrich these data by providing immunohistochemical and ultrastructural details on young and older stem internodes. Antibodies recognizing non-cellulosic polysaccharides (galactans, arabinans, rhamnogalacturonans) and arabinogalactan proteins were here investigated with the goal of understanding whether their distribution changes in the stem tissues in relation to the bast fiber and vascular tissue development. The results obtained indicate that the occurrence and distribution of cell wall polysaccharides and proteins differ between young and older internodes and that these changes are particularly evident in the bast fibers.

PMID:33839957 | DOI:10.1007/s00709-021-01641-1

#Hemp https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33839957/?utm_source=Chrome&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=12OY-2YuXEtecDR7WE-A2c-rtPCJqs0e275YvMbwhvRR34bgib&fc=None&ff=20210412152517&v=2.14.3 April 11, 2021 10:00 am