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Quick Hits: More States Legalize Cannabis

Quick Hits: More States Legalize Cannabis

Connecticut Legalizes Cannabis

Members of the state House and Senate approved S.B. 1201 on Thursday, legalizing the adult-use marijuana market.

Next, they submitted the measure to Democratic Gov. Ned Lamont, who is expected to sign the bill into law.

The Nutmeg State will be the fifth after New York, New Mexico, Virginia, and technically New Jersey that approved legalization this year. 

Rhode Island Senate Approves Adult-Use Cannabis 

The Senate Judiciary Committee approved a bill on Monday that would legalize, tax, and regulate marijuana for adult use, marking the first time such a bill has moved to the floor of either chamber of the General Assembly in Rhode Island.

The bill would create an independent cannabis control commission to oversee the program and issue licenses for cannabis retailers passed 6 to 2.

It’s expected to go to the full Senate next Tuesday.

Legalization in Virginia

Cannabis becomes legal in Virginia on July 1.

According to Virginia’s chapter of NORML, the legalization law allows for possession by adults 21+ of up to one ounce and personal, home cultivation of up to 4 plants per household by adults 21+ at their primary residence, if the plants have labels, are out of public view, and kept away from children. 

Additionally, adult-sharing of up to one ounce in private without remuneration; and continued participation in the medical cannabis program, which allows buying marijuana. It delivers at Virginia dispensaries. 

However, the selling of marijuana seeds will still be illegal, and so will transporting seeds across state lines. 

Full story here. 

Product Launches

Photo courtesy of Gem + Jane.

CannaCraft launched its new brand Gem + Jane: A sparkling botanical beverage that blends simple ingredients with microdoses of cannabinoids, including THCV, Delta-8 THC, and CBD.

The drink will be available exclusively at Sweet Flower dispensary locations throughout greater Los Angeles beginning June 17th. 

The original, pioneering edibles editor for High Times magazine and author of cannabis cookbook Bong Appetit, Chef Elise McDonough, serves as Brand Manager for Gem + Jane.  

Emphasizing the natural tastes and aroma of citrus, berries, herbs, and flowers (Think Petal with cannabis added), the Gem + Jane beverage line blends complex layers of playful flavors on the palate.

It delivers a light, manageable dose of cannabis for most consumers.

It comes in four sophisticated flavors, as well as an unflavored, pure Simply Seltzer for mixing up mocktails or enjoying on its own.

The Elderflower Pear, Lemon Blueberry Lavender, and Strawberry Hibiscus varieties contain a blend of 4mg Delta-8 THC and 2mg CBD for more mellow moments like relaxing with friends. 

The Simply Seltzer and Yuzu Rose Raspberry flavor each contain 4mg THCV and <2mg THC. 

Drop 2.0

Drop Delivery, an all-in-one delivery technology suite for cannabis retail businesses, announced Wednesday the launch of a new white-labeled consumer e-commerce web-based app, Drop 2.0.

The app includes a more customizable homepage, improved product search capabilities, highly detailed product filtering, and a more engaging way for consumers to take advantage of retailers’ deals.

Drop Delivery CEO and Co-founder Vanessa Gabriel cite wanting to emulate and elevate the best mainstream e-commerce experiences with the development of Drop 2.0. 

Expanding upon ordering ahead, Drop 2.0 offers retailers an app-based e-commerce shopping experience akin to Sephora or Instacart.

The new app provides more freedom to customize the web-based app based on their specific hyperlocal preferences and provides customers with fresh, powerful shopping tools. 

“While cannabis e-commerce is relatively new, e-commerce is not, and consumers expect certain features to be a part of that shopping experience,” said Gabriel. “That includes being able to search for products based on current and past searches, highly categorized product filters, and being able to take advantage of discounts and deals all in the same place. 

Mendi CBD

Because the world needs yet another celebrity-endorsed CBD brand, Mendi Founder and CEO Rachael Rapinoe, sister to 2x World Cup Champion Olympic gold medalist Megan Rapinoe, and co-founder Brett Schwager have created Mendi.

The Portland, Oregon-based brand is “championing their cause to level the playing field by innovating natural alternatives to sports medicine.”

Their “proprietary blends of all-natural hemp CBD products target pain relief, inflammation, and mood to improve sleep and recovery.” 

Like Carli Lloyd using CBD Medic before it, Mendi aims to soothe the shin splints for the athlete or gym rat in all of us. 


#CBD #Hemp
https://cannatechtoday.com/quick-hits-more-states-legalize-cannabis/
June 18, 2021 6:22 pm

SC Labs Develops Comprehensive Hemp Testing Panel

SC Labs Develops Comprehensive Hemp Testing Panel

SC Labs, a cannabis testing company with roots in Santa Cruz, California, announced this week that they have developed a comprehensive hemp testing panel that covers a number of contaminants on a national regulatory level. In the press release, the company says they aim to fill the void of national hemp testing requirements.

The hemp testing panel they have developed purportedly meets testing standards in states that require contaminant levels below a certain action limit. The SC Labs hemp testing panel could theoretically be used for regulatory compliance testing across the country, reaching action limits and analyte levels that meet the strictest state requirements.

The panel tests for pesticides, heavy metals, microbiology, mycotoxins, residual solvents and water activity. In the press release, the company says they have received ISO accreditation for the panel, although it’s not immediately clear to what standard it has been accredited.

Still, the test panel is one sign of progress in the long road to nationally harmonized testing standards. “As an industry, we’ve been advocating for national, standardized, and transparent testing regulations for years now,” says Jeff Gray, CEO of SC Labs. “The government has been slow to respond so we decided it was time to act. As an industry, we’ve been advocating for national, standardized, and transparent testing regulations for years now. The government has been slow to respond so we decided it was time to act.”

SC Labs is headquartered in Santa Cruz, but has licenses in California, Oregon, Texas and Colorado (pending). Their California and Oregon locations are both ISO 17025-accredited and conducting THC-containing cannabis testing, as well as hemp testing.

The post SC Labs Develops Comprehensive Hemp Testing Panel appeared first on Cannabis Industry Journal.


#CBD #Hemp

SC Labs Develops Comprehensive Hemp Testing Panel


June 16, 2021 6:55 pm

Dems Discover the Overton Window, Slam It Hard to the Left

Finally Democrats have discovered the Overton Window (OW) and are using it properly. While the GOP has long used it (using the Luntzian dystopia “Death to drug dealers,” and “Cannabis has no medical value, FDA says so”), Dems have not tried to shift the OW until now, with the Drug Policy Reform Act (DRPA) decriminalizing all controlled substances at the federal level.

Some were so bad at the OW that even a Congressman from ultra-liberal Boulder proposed putting marijuana into the BATF for regulation, and another liberal Representative from Oregon wanted to tax workers and businesses like tobacco. Both “friends of Cannabis” actually wanted the excise tax at 50%, whereas the MORE Act pegs it at 5%; that’s how badly Dems mismanaged the OW.

Ideas that are inside the two policy extremes (inside the OW) are politically viable, those outside are not. Events can shift the Window in the minds of the public and become politically viable quickly, or it might take decades.

How DRPA uses the OW is like this: currently there are a number of marjuana descheduling bills in Congress, including the new and improved MORE Act, a version of which passed last December. Currently in the OW model, that MORE Act defines one extreme of the Window, being the most liberal. With the DRPA they have shifted that left boundary further to the left from the MORE Act. Suddenly, the MORE Act doesn’t look nearly as liberal when viewed against “legalizing all drugs,” like DRPA does. Ironically, DRPA is really not that extreme, at least in the minds of the public: the ACLU released a national poll that found 66% of American voters were in support of removing criminal penalties for all drugs and replacing them with health-centered approaches.

Oregon voters passed a drug decriminalization initiative handily last year, as did a few cities more slated to do so next year. This creates a Constitutional crisis between state decrim policy and federal CSA, just as marijuana legalization does. The more states do it, the more other states will follow. The pernicious persistent venality of Schedule 1 must end, and state-by-state decrim is a great way to force the federal to act while in the meantime saving citizens from a life destroyed by the law.

It’s the little things that can mean a lot, like this. Frank Luntz made this his career, such as by framing laws such as the estate tax as a “Death Tax,” and the like. By framing it thusly he helped ensure its success and provided political cover for politicians from their constituents ever knowing they sold them out. It was as brilliant as it was evil. BTW, George Lakoff is the left’s answer to Luntz, check him out.

And as for those on our side who are fatalistic about these bills and their prospects for success, the simple reason I no longer join you after 49 years of advocacy is that I wish to maintain pressure on those in power to do the right thing, and fatalism removes that pressure. Giving them an energetic or political “out” such as “they’ll never do it” or “it’s impossible” ensures that they’ll never do it and that it’s impossible. Instead, I demand they step up and do what 92% of the public want, the right thing. The man who says it can’t be done and the one who says it can are both right, so I intend to hold “Jailin’ Joe” and “Kamala the Kop” accountable for their past policy failures when it comes to drug laws. Please join me.

From the Drug Policy Alliance on the Drug Policy Reform Act:

Two days before the 50th anniversary of when President Richard Nixon declared the “war on drugs,” Representatives Bonnie Watson Coleman (D-NJ) and Cori Bush (D-MO) unveiled the Drug Policy Reform Act (DPRA), alongside the Drug Policy Alliance, which has been a strategic partner on the development of the legislation. The bill would end criminal penalties for drug possession at the federal level, shift the regulatory authority from the Attorney General to the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS), expunge records and provide for resentencing, and reinvest in alternative health-centered approaches. The bill also eliminates many of the life-long consequences associated with drug arrests and convictions, including the denial of employment, public benefits, immigration status, drivers’ licenses, and voting rights.

“Every 23 seconds, a person’s life is ruined for simply possessing drugs. Drug possession remains the most arrested offense in the United States despite the well-known fact that drug criminalization does nothing to help communities, it ruins them. It tears families apart, and causes trauma that can be felt for generations. The drug war has caused mass devastation to Black, Latinx, Indigenous and low-income communities and today we say, ‘Enough is enough!’” said Queen Adesuyi, Policy Manager for the Office of National Affairs at the Drug Policy Alliance.

In addition to eliminating criminal penalties for drug possession at the federal level, the bill also incentivizes state and local governments to adopt decriminalization policies by otherwise limiting their eligibility to receive funds in the Byrne and COPS grant programs.

Aside from eliminating criminal penalties for drug possession, the Drug Policy Reform Act:

  • Automatically expunges and seals records.
  • Provides relief for people currently incarcerated or on supervision for certain drug convictions.
  • Shifts the regulatory authority for substances listed under the Controlled Substances Act from the Attorney General to the Secretary of HHS.
  • Reinvests funds to support programs that work on expanding access to substance use treatment, support harm reduction services, and reduce the criminalization of individuals who use drugs by supporting the development or expansion of pre-arrest diversion programs.
  • Promotes evidence-based drug education.
  • Prohibits the denial of employment or termination based upon a criminal history for drug possession.
  • Explicitly prohibits drug testing for individuals to receive federal benefits.
  • Prevents drug use charges/convictions from being held against an individual in order to receive SNAP/TANF, housing assistance and other federal benefits.
  • Prevents individuals in the U.S. from being denied immigration status due to personal drug use.
  • Prevents individuals from being denied the right to vote regardless if they have served their sentence or not, and restores voting rights to those who have been impacted in the past.
  • Ensures individuals with drug convictions can gain access to drivers’ licenses.
  • Prohibits the use of civil asset forfeitures related to personal drug possession cases.
  • Charges HHS with establishing a “Commission on Substance Use, Health and Safety,” to determine the benchmark amounts for drug possession and publish an online report on their findings within 180 days. The report will also include recommendations for preventing the prosecution of individuals possessing, distributing or dispensing personal use quantities of each drug.
  • Improves research on impact of drug criminalization and enforcement.
  • Funds data collection and transparency on all available data related to enforcement of drug laws, including local arrests for drug possession and distribution offenses, possession of drug paraphernalia, public or intoxication, loitering, and all other drug-related violations.

For a summary of the DPRA from DPA, click here: https://drugpolicy.org/sites/default/files/dpra_summary.pdf

Five Cannabis Leaders Forecast Industry Changes

Five Cannabis Leaders Forecast Industry Changes

There’s no question that the cannabis industry is booming and changing daily. MJBizDaily recently released a publication that expects marijuana sales to boost the economy by $92 billion in 2021 alone. That statistic is up 30% from last year, and the same analysis predicts it will reach upwards of $160 billion by 2025.

With all of this incredible growth, significant changes are on the horizon. So, we decided to ask five top leaders in the cannabis and CBD industries about the changes they anticipate happening in the next five years. 

Here’s what they shared. 

1 . Products Will Become More Accessible to the Consumer

“[The majority of CBD products] are trying to be luxury brands and premium brands. And that just isn’t a sustainable marketplace, nor what serves most consumer needs,” explains Sequoia Prince-Lazarus, Founder and CEO of Lazarus Naturals.

He founded his company to fill a void in the marketplace, and his mission was to make farm-to-bottle CBD products that were both effective and affordable. He believes we’ll see more accessible products like his in the future, and in the next five years the industry will normalize, and prices will fall. 

“I think [brands] are trying to effectively milk it for all it’s worth before the prices come down,” he shared. And the high prices are coming at the expense of consumers.

Because luxury brands are nearly ten times the cost of typical supplements, it’s difficult for the average consumer to include CBD as part of their health routine. 

As more and more brands enter the marketplace, Price-Lazarus predicts that we’ll see a lot more commoditization and more affordable brands. “Eventually, the prices will be no more than twice the price of normal supplements, and they may even be more affordable than over-the-counter drugs or at least similar prices,” he shared. 

2. Tailored Delivery Methods to Fit Each Use Case

As more and more scientists research cannabinoids from a medical perspective, Price-Lazarus also predicts that we’ll see delivery methods tailored to each use case. “Right now, we’re operating off of anecdotal evidence for the most part—and also a few research papers,” he shared. 

But as medical research expands, he predicts scientists will know which delivery methods are most effective for treating each ailment. “You’ll have to understand market trends and consumer preference and pair that in.

But I think it will be more important to know what type of cannabinoids, at what exact levels, and determining the right and proper serving,” he explained.

As the industry better understands the answers to these questions, more brands will take a scientific approach to how CBD should be delivered. Delivery methods that fit the use case of those substances will reign supreme, meaning more effective products for consumers. 

3. Brands Will Understand the Power of Cannabinoid Combos

Because there’s not very much research done on isolated cannabinoids that aren’t THC, Marcus Quinn, CEO of Your CBD Store, says there’s tons of opportunity to study the combination of cannabinoids. “[Medical research] hasn’t even begun to look at how [certain cannabinoids] work together,” he explained.

Quinn and his wife, Rachael Quinn, founded their company after using CBD products to treat Rachael’s Crohn’s disease. After finding much-sought-after relief from the hemp products, the duo realized they could help heal others with the supplement.

And they even began creating their own products, which are tested and certified by ISO-accredited labs.

“[The industry] looks totally different than it did five years ago. And I think five years from now, it’s going to look totally different, too,” Quinn explained. “We know CBD somewhat blocks THC, but we don’t know if that affects the efficacy of the THC. And now, we know about even more cannabinoids, like CBG and CBN.”

Quinn believes that as interest peaks and regulations change, more researchers will start asking the right questions. “Like, what [cannabinoid combos] are the best? Does it vary from person to person? Or are there different ratios that give you better [results]?”

If brands want to survive in the next five years, their offerings can’t remain stagnant. Because more innovative brands will force the industry to stay on the cutting edge.

Brands that thrive will identify the cannabinoid combination trends. They’ll work with the research and listen to the science.  And they’ll adapt their products accordingly to provide the best in the market. 

4. Brands Will Focus More on Developing People

According to Nichole LaMay, Head of HR and Culture at Mammoth Distribution, cannabis brands have left employee development on the table for far too long. “There’s an opportunity for growing and developing people in this industry,” she explained. “So being able to have solid learning, development and succession plans that continue to evolve and grow employees will be important.”

She says brands will need to take an innovative and unique approach to these programs if they want to reach and resonate with their audience. They’ll also need to invest in performance-proven c-suite leaders who align with their culture. 

“Having people who are passionate about what they do helps you drive everything you’re doing,” she explained. “When you have a healthy, robust culture where people want to come to work and want to collaborate for the greatest good, you see the greatest results.”

5. More Small Businesses to Help Local Communities and Support The Global Good

Thomas Rimbach, Co-Founder, and CEO at Baked Bros, says predicting the next five years is challenging. “Because where I want to see it and where we might end up —with a bunch of money and corporate backing —are two different directions.” 

He hopes that small businesses in America will be able to keep and maintain the footing they’ve helped build thus far. “I’d like to see small businesses helping local communities and supporting globally, but I don’t know how it’s going to work out once it’s federally legal and big money opens up.”

Rimbach told us there’s one thing he knows for sure: Small businesses (like his) will drive the industry forward with more sustainable business practices and put consumers first. “We want to prevent [the cannabis industry] from going to this corporate setting—where people are forgotten and treated as a ticket,” he shared.

Predicting what’s next in cannabis is a tall order. With rules that vary from state to state, constant regulation changes, and a chance to become federally legal, this industry is constantly changing. Whatever happens next will make or break the brands that built the industry—and only the most innovative will survive. 


#CBD #Hemp
https://cannatechtoday.com/five-cannabis-leaders-forecast-industry-changes/
June 14, 2021 4:06 pm

Quick Hits: Criminal and Social Justice Reform in Cannabis Industry

Quick Hits: Criminal and Social Justice Reform in Cannabis Industry

The NFL and NFLPA will award $1M in up to five grants as the league seeks to know more about the efficacy of cannabis and CBD for pain management.

The National Football League and its Players Association are providing $1 million in funding for research into pain management and cannabinoids through its joint pain management committee, the NFL announced on Tuesday.

The league and union launched the committee last year and said cannabis is included in its research into alternative therapies for pain management.

According to Gangapreneur, “Up to five grants are expected to be awarded by Thanksgiving as the league seeks to learn more about the efficacy of cannabis and CBD and their potential as alternatives to opioids.”

Full story here. 

Zelira Therapeutics has licensed its ZTL-106 proprietary cannabinoid formulation to Levin Health for a chronic pain treatment clinical trial on retired athletes.

Zelira Therapeutics Ltd (ASX: ZLD, OTCQB: ZLDAF), a company that focuses on the development of clinically validated cannabinoid-based medicines, announces that it has licensed a proprietary cannabinoid formulation to Levin Health Limited (Levin Health) to undertake a clinical trial to test the efficacy of the formulation in treating sports-related chronic pain experienced by retired professional and amateur athletes.

Studies show that retired athletes are more likely to suffer chronic pain and associated conditions such as depression and anxiety due to injuries and physical exertion over long periods.

While clinical data is currently limited, medicinal cannabis may provide a safe and effective targeted treatment option for this large cohort.

The clinical trial to be conducted by Levin Health will address this.

In addition to licensing the proprietary formulation to Levin Health, Zelira and Levin Health have entered into a Project Management Agreement, whereby Levin Health will pay for the trial and engage Zelira to project manage the clinical trial to be undertaken at La Trobe University’s Sport and Exercise Medicine Research Centre in Victoria, Australia.

Morocco’s House of Councilors finally passes their cannabis legalization bill.

After several amendments, Morocco’s House of Councilors has finally approved the intensely debated measure on the limited legalization of cannabis.

Morocco’s Parliament put Bill No. 13.21, concerning the commercialization and legal uses of cannabis, up for a vote during today’s governmental plenary session.

It passed by a majority vote, with 41 advisers voting in favor and 11 voting against. 

The bill aims to improve Moroccan farmers’ income and give rise to “promising and sustainable” job opportunities in the country’s rural regions. 

Full story here.   

Connecticut: Senate Lawmakers Advance Adult Use Marijuana Legalization Bill

(Via NORML) Members of the Connecticut state Senate have approved legislation, Senate Bill 1118, to legalize the adult use of marijuana, regulate its commercial retail sales, and tax the potency of THC. 

SB 1118 allows adults 21 and older to legally purchase and possess up to 1.5 ounces of marijuana in public and up to five ounces of marijuana in their private residence. 

Beginning October 2021, state-registered medical cannabis patients will be permitted to cultivate up to three mature and three immature marijuana plants.

Non-patients must wait until 2023 until they are legally allowed to home-cultivate marijuana for personal use.

Those with past criminal records for activities involving up to four ounces of cannabis will automatically expunge their convictions.

Those with convictions for more serious offenses can petition the courts to take action.  

The proposed measure also limits the discriminatory actions that employers, hospitals, and others may take against those who test positive for past cannabis exposure.

The bill also provides protections for parents and tenants who use cannabis in compliance with the law.

It mandates that the odor of marijuana alone cannot be used as a basis for police to search an individual.

It prohibits jail time as a penalty for those under 21 years of age who are caught in possession of marijuana.

Under the legislation, marijuana flowers available at retail facilities will be capped at 30 percent THC, while concentrated products (except vape cartridges) will be capped at 60 percent THC.

Senate lawmakers approved the bill with a 19 to 17 vote.

House lawmakers are expected to consider the proposal shortly.

Lawmakers face a tight deadline of Wednesday, June 9, 2021, at midnight to move SB 1118 through the House and to the Governor’s desk before the legislative session adjourns for the year.

The Hawthorne Social Justice Fund within The Scotts Miracle-Gro Foundation Announce New Grants

Today, the Hawthorne Gardening Company (Hawthorne) announced the first grantees of The Hawthorne Social Justice Fund within The Scotts Miracle-Gro Foundation.

These organizations are contributing to criminal and social justice reform for the cannabis industry. 

The $2.5 million fund is dedicated to non-profit organizations working toward social justice reform within state-regulated cannabis industries.

The recipients include Minorities for Medical Marijuana and United Returning Citizens.

In addition, Hawthorne is funding the NuLeaf Project, an organization that provides direct support for minority cannabis entrepreneurs through a corporate donation. 

As North America’s household name in indoor and hydroponic growing supplies, Hawthorne has committed to using its influence and resources to help drive criminal justice reform related to cannabis prohibition and contribute to shaping a more equitable post-prohibition cannabis industry. 

“Our commitment to being a good company is what drove us to create The Hawthorne Social Justice Fund within The Scotts Miracle-Gro Foundation. As we announced earlier this year, establishing the fund with an initial investment of $2.5 million to support non-profit organizations with cannabis social justice missions,” said Chris Hagedorn, Executive Vice President and Division President of Hawthorne. “This fund deepens Hawthorne’s commitment to sparking change as policy reform advances across the country and states address the legacy of racial inequity tied to cannabis prohibition. We promise to support programming that helps communities and individuals who have been negatively affected by the long-standing and systemic inequality related to cannabis prohibition in the United States.”

The Hawthorne Social Justice Fund grantees were chosen because of the powerful work they’re doing to address the negative impacts caused by the disproportionate number of cannabis-related arrests and incarcerations involving persons of color to support minority entrepreneurs and increase investments in minority communities. 

The work of the Fund’s grantees includes:

 

  • Minorities for Medical Marijuana provides advocacy, outreach, research, and training related to business, social reform, public policy, and health/wellness in the cannabis industry. Its Project Clean Slate program offers expungement clinics and wraparound services nationwide for those affected by past marijuana possession charges. At the same time, Project Safe Access NV assists members of the Latino community in accessing medical marijuana. 

 

  • NuLeaf Project is working to build intergenerational wealth via the legal cannabis industry for the communities disproportionately harmed by cannabis criminalization–including Black and Brown communities. Hawthorne is a corporate sponsor for the Nu School Accelerator Program, which offers financial support and technical expertise on cannabis startup financing and operating an ancillary business.

 

  • United Returning Citizens provides job search and training, life and financial literacy skills, and transitional and stable housing for citizens reentering society from correctional facilities. This partnership focuses on workforce development, helping people with cannabis convictions in a high-unemployment area (Youngstown, Ohio) find employment and start hemp and indoor cultivation businesses.

 

Product Launches:

Homie: Helping Homeless Youth One Hoodie At A Time

Homie was born in 2015 from a shared passion between three friends eager to break down the stigma associated with homelessness and help young people who found themselves living on the streets.

Homie continues to draw awareness to the faces and stories of everyday youth affected by homelessness and allows them to share their narrative in a dignified way – ultimately destigmatizing and humanizing the issue.

With its recent expansion in the U.S., Homie seeks to continue empowering young people and raising awareness across the globe from Melbourne to Los Angeles.

 Homie has designed trendy and comfortable all-season pieces, collaborating with Champion, a household name in hoodies,  to create a new line. 100% of profits go towards achieving their mission of supporting young people affected by homelessness or hardship and help them become their champions. 

House of Saka announces the release of Saka Spark Mimosa. 

Photo courtesy of House of Saka.

House of Saka, Inc., Napa Valley producers of the award-winning cannabis beverages Saka PINK and Saka WHITE, announced Tuesday the launch of much-anticipated single-serve offering, Saka Spark ‘Mimosa.’

House of Saka Spark ‘Mimosa’ is the first and only cannabis-infused beverage to blend alcohol-removed, premium, California sparkling Chardonnay with the natural essence of orange blossom, nectarine, and a Mimosa-strain specific live resin to bolster its organic cannabis emulsion. 

Available in single-serve, 187ml (6 ounces) champagne bottles with a micro-dose of 5mgs of full-spectrum THC per bottle, Saka Spark Mimosa delivers all the flavor and celebration of a traditional Mimosa, without the adverse health effects and excessive calories of alcohol. 

“Saka Spark Mimosa marks the next evolution in cannabis beverages,” explains Tracey Mason, Co-founder & CEO. “Offering enhanced bioavailability, a unique, strain-specific full spectrum experience, and unparalleled flavor, House of Saka continues to set the standard for quality and true innovation in the infused beverage sector.”

Just in time for summer imbibing, Mimosa is available wherever House of Saka Vinfusions™ are sold. 

Plus Pride Limited Edition Pride Rainbow Sherbet

Photo courtesy of PLUS.

PLUS announces the release of a celebratory rainbow-marbled gummy from California’s cannabis cube connoisseurs, featuring a rainbow sherbet flavor and an uplifting Sativa strain. 

Ten percent of the proceeds of Plus Pride sales will be donated to the San Francisco-based, Black trans-women led Transgender, Gender-Variant & Intersex Justice Project (TGIJP) to further their mission of ending the human rights abuses committed against Black and Brown TGI people inside of California prisons, jails, detention centers and beyond.

TGIJP provides advocacy, legal and re-entry services, direct life-saving services like temporary housing, employment, and transportation.

The gummies are $18 and contain 5mg THC. Pride and more varieties are available throughout California.


#CBD #Hemp
https://cannatechtoday.com/quick-hits-criminal-and-social-justice-reform-in-cannabis-industry/
June 11, 2021 10:47 pm

Trade Secrets: Innovators Share Their Strategies for Industry Domination

Trade Secrets: Innovators Share Their Strategies for Industry Domination

Each quarter, Cannabis & Tech Today speaks with innovative brands from around the country to discover who is leading the call for a more resilient, thoughtful, transparent cannabis industry.

This issue, we’re highlighting three brands receiving national attention for their commitment to excellence within the cannabis community. 

Clear Cannabis Inc.

Rich Batenburg Jr., has decades of experience developing scalable business models in various industries.

As president and chairman of Clear Cannabis, Inc., Batenburg is using his expertise to develop an infrastructure for the company capable of scaling to a national level.

Rich Batenburg Jr.: What was going to happen with cannabis in my mind was exactly what happened with cable.

Richard M Batenburg. Photo courtesy of Clear Cannabis, Inc.

A bunch of mom-and-pop operators who were very passionate about the product, very customer-centric, but did not have the skills and the foresight and capitalization to build heavy weight infrastructure that could scale to handle millions of customers as opposed to thousands of customers.

So I thought “Hey, this is my opportunity to fix all this stuff that’s been broken in cable before it happens in cannabis.”

Once we have ubiquitous legalization, big food, big pharma, big tobacco, and big agriculture will likely be taking over this industry.

It takes money to scale up.

There are thousands of inventive, creative, sincere, gentle geniuses in the business that have come up with products.

What you don’t see is the massive distribution and commercialization of those products.

That’s really our focus.

What I liked about Clear Cannabis is it has a trade secret component to it, it has a formula.

It’s not based on things you can’t own.

Nobody can own a strain name.

It’s not a capitalistic thing, but a brand needs to have its own identity and its own interpersonal and emotional connection to the customer and it needs to have a brand promise that can be replicated. 

GrowRay Technologies

Ash Ganley. Photo courtesy of GrowRay Technologies

The cannabis space, in many ways, is about collaboration.

The industry relies on different sectors coming together to create solutions.

Ash Ganley, CEO of GrowRay Technologies understands the fractured nature of the industry and is working to unite growers with technology and science to create a more efficient cultivation ecosystem. 

Ash Ganley: “We realized quickly that the market is not always going to be so high margin that you could hide bad business practices and hide a lack of efficiency in your operation and production.

And now that’s happening across the country.

As prices are coming down and regulations are increasing in terms of how much electricity you use per square foot, etc., a lot of growers who used pre-legal, scaled-up practices are losing their businesses because they’re not taking those low-margin, high-efficiency lessons from traditional agronomy.

That’s what we’re doing, is really learning cannabis from a whole systems technical point of view, knowing all the while that we have to get better.

Photo courtesy of GrowRay Technologies

We’re never going to be good enough.

You always have to keep learning.

But we’re pushing the envelope, and we know that.

So, we have to be curious.

We have to be hungry.

We have to learn together.

The whole issue of legality in cannabis has forced a lot of businesses to operate in a silo or in a vacuum.

So it’s a very fractured industry and that has hamstrung innovation in a big way.

We’re just trying to approach it from that point of view.

Aspen Green

Colorado-based Aspen Green is one of only seven USDA Organic certified full-spectrum hemp and CBD brands in the country.

Their products are free from toxins, formaldehyde, phthalates, parabens, and sulfates.

They’re one of five brands recognized by Realm of Caring for their commitment to transparency, quality, and integrity.

To learn more about the company’s commitment to serving the industry, we spoke with Aspen Green President and CEO Brandon Lewis.

Brandon Lewis. Photo courtesy of Aspen Green.

Brandon Lewis: We are filling the need for education around the hemp plant, it’s properties, and where to find the actual science that’s been conducted for decades — which can start with a simple search at the National Institute of Health. 

We are passionate about assisting people in what to look for in high-quality hemp & CBD products even if not from Aspen Green. 

We believe cannabis will be federally legal within 5 years and consumers will be educated on the value of the whole hemp plant and all of its properties. 

We also believe laws will become uniform versus how fragmented they are currently at the state level. 

We also see the industry maturing to focusing on various regions where the plant is grown, much like wine. 

In our opinion, what Napa is to wine — the Colorado Rockies are to hemp.


#CBD #Hemp
https://cannatechtoday.com/trade-secrets/
June 11, 2021 11:00 am

How Effective is Your Internal Auditing Program?

How Effective is Your Internal Auditing Program?

The word “audit” evokes various emotions depending on your role in an organization and the context of the audit. While most are familiar with and loathe the IRS’s potential for a tax audit, the audits we are going to discuss today are (or should be) welcomed – proactive internal quality audits. A softer term that is also acceptable is “self-assessment.” These are independent assessments conducted to determine how effective an organization’s risk management, processes and general governance is. 

“How do you know where you’re going if you don’t know where you’ve been” – Maya Angelou

Internal quality audits are critical to ensuring the safety of products, workers, consumers and the environment. When planned and performed periodically, these audits provide credible, consistent and objective evidence to inform the organization of its risks, weaknesses and opportunities for improvement. Ask yourself the question: do your clients/vendors rely on you to produce reliable, consistent and safe products? Assuming the answer is yes, what confidence do you have, and where is the documented evidence to support it?

Compliance units within cannabis businesses are typically responsible for ensuring a business stays legally compliant with state and federal regulations. This level of minimum compliance is critical to prevent fines and ensure licenses are not revoked. However, compliance audits rarely include fundamental components that leave cannabis operators exposed to many unnecessary risks.

Internal quality audits are critical to ensuring the safety of products, workers, consumers and the environment.

As a producer of medical and adult-use products that are ingested, inhaled or consumed in other forms by our friends, family and neighbors, how can you be sure that these products are produced safely and consistently? Are you confident that the legal requirements mandated by your state cannabis control board are sufficient? Judging by the number of recalls and frustrations voiced by the industry regarding the myriad of regulations, I would bet the answer is no.

What questions do internal audits address? Some examples include:

  • Are you operating as management intends?
  • How effective is your system in meeting specified objectives? These objectives could include quality metrics of your products, on-time delivery rates and other client/customer satisfaction metrics.
  • Are there opportunities to improve?
  • Are you doing what you say you do (in your SOPs), and do you have the recorded evidence (records) to prove it?
  • Are you meeting the requirements of all applicable government regulations?

There are potential drawbacks to internal audits. For one, as impartiality is essential in internal audits, it may be challenging to identify an impartial internal auditor in a small operation. If your team always feels like it is in firefighting mode, it may feel like a luxury to take the time to pull members out of their day-to-day duties and disrupt ongoing operations for an audit. Some fear that as internal assessments are meant to be more thorough than external assessments, a laundry list of to-do items may be uncovered due to the audit. But, these self-assessments often uncover issues that have resulted in operational efficiencies in the first place. This resulting “laundry list” then affords a proactive tool to implement corrective actions in an organized manner that can prevent the recurrence of major issues, as well as prevent new issues. The benefits of internal audits outweigh the drawbacks; not to mention, conducting internal audits is required by nearly every globally-recognized program, both voluntary (e.g. ISO 9001 or ASTM Internationals’s Cannabis Certification Program) and government required programs such as 21 CFR 211 for Pharmaceuticals.

Internal Auditing is a catalyst for improving an organization’s effectiveness and efficiency by providing insight and recommendations based on analyses and assessments of data and business processes. Additional benefits of internal audits include giving your organization the means to:

  • Ensure compliance to the requirements of internal, international and industry standards as well as regulations and customer requirements
  • Determine the effectiveness of the implemented system in meeting specified objectives (quality, environmental, financial)
  • Explore opportunities for improvement
  • Meet statutory and regulatory requirements
  • Provide feedback to Top Management
  • Lower the cost of poor quality

Findings from all audits must be addressed. This is typically done in accordance with a CAPA (Corrective Action Preventive Action) program. To many unfamiliar with Quality Management Systems, this may be a new term. As of Jan 1, 2021, this is now a requirement for all cannabis licensed operators in Colorado. Many other states require a CAPA program or similar. Continuing education units (CEUs) are available through ASTM International’s CAPA training program, which was developed specifically for the cannabis industry.

Examples of common audit findings that require CAPAs include:

  • Calibration – Production and test equipment must be calibrated to ensure they provide accurate and repeatable results.
  • Document and record control – Documents and records need to be readily accessible but protected from unintended use.
  • Supplier management – Most standards have various requirements for supplier management that may include auditing suppliers, monitoring supplier performance, only using suppliers certified to specific standards, etc.
  • Internal audits – Believe it or not, since internal audits are required by many programs, it’s not uncommon to have a finding related to internal audits! Findings from an internal audit can include not conducting audits on schedule, not addressing audit findings or not having a properly qualified internal auditor. Are you looking for more guidance? Last year, members of ASTM International’s D37 Committee on Cannabis approved a Standard Guide for Cannabis and Hemp Operation Compliance Audits, ASTM D8308-21.

If you are still on the fence about the value of an internal audit, given the option of an inspector uncovering a non-conformance or your own team discovering and then correcting it, which would you prefer? With fines easily exceeding $100,000 by many cannabis enforcement units, the answer should be clear. Internal audits are a valuable tool that should not be feared.

The post How Effective is Your Internal Auditing Program? appeared first on Cannabis Industry Journal.


#CBD #Hemp

How Effective is Your Internal Auditing Program?


June 9, 2021 3:58 pm

5 Laws Every Vape Company Owner in the U.S. Should Know

5 Laws Every Vape Company Owner in the U.S. Should Know

It’s always an advantage to know the vaping laws governing the marketing, sales, and use of vape products, especially if you’re a company in the e-cigarette industry. In the U.S, the sales and use of vape pens, liquid nicotine, e-cigarettes, e-liquids, or bulk import of such products aren’t without a list of requirements and regulatory guidelines.

You need to ensure compliance for your company and employees. This calls for an in-depth understanding of the rules and regulations surrounding customer age verifications, product placements and displays, sampling, internet and mail orders, restricted store sections, and many more.

Like most laws in the U.S, there are state and federal regulations for nicotine devices. Certain states in the U.S consider vaping companies to be manufacturers and retailers. What this implies is that you’ll have to deal with additional rules and laws. Ensuring that you’re compliant will save you a lot of delays, fees, and fines.

This article covers five essential laws you should understand as a vape company in the U.S. But before diving into it, let’s look at a general overview of vape regulations.

A Quick Overview

In the latter part of December 2020, a budget package saw the light of day after its passing by Congress.

The package included the likes of the coronavirus relief bill, but what would interest most vape companies was a 5000-page document also located inside the package.

This document was the law called the Preventing Online Sales of E-Cigarettes to Children Act.

It regulated several vape products, like the dual battery vape mods and the more sophisticated vape setups like the Tesla Punk Vape MOD. But this was just a piece of the iceberg, and laws such as these can easily go unnoticed if you’re not paying attention. So let’s take a closer look at five of them.

1.   Preventing Online Sales of E-Cigarettes to Children Act

President Trump signed this Act into law in 2020. In the vaping industry, this act is commonly called the “vape mail ban.”

However, vape companies will feel the effects of the Preventing Online Sales of E-Cigarettes to Children Act reaching past the postal delivery. Despite its popularity since December 2020, this law isn’t new.

It had previously passed the House back in 2019 and, in July 2020, made its way to the Senate in somewhat different forms. However, the Senate received a call-to-action from CASAA concerning the bill before its passing in the summer.

Overall, few vape businesses and vapers are alarmed by the possible impacts of its passage, not knowing its full impacts.

2.   Preventing All Cigarette Trafficking (PACT)

All vendors of vapor products and businesses that deal in devices that deliver flavor, the nicotine from an aerosolized solution, or other substances that enable users to inhale will have to comply with Prevent All Cigarette Trafficking (PACT) from late March 2021. This law also goes by the name Jenkins Act.

It regulates regular vapor products that deliver nicotine and non-nicotine vapor products, which the government might regard as containing hemp oil.

Failure to abide by the rules and regulations stipulated by the Jenkins/PACT Act exposes vape companies to the possibility of heavy fines in the sums of $5,000 to $10,000 for each violation.

3.   FDA Regulation of ENDS

Electronic nicotine delivery systems, otherwise termed ENDS, are devices such as vape pens, electronic cigarettes, vaporizers, and e-pipes, among many others. All these devices are non-combustible tobacco products.

The FDA in 2016 concluded a ruling that extended CTP’s regulatory domain to cover tobacco products, including ENDS that fall under the category of tobacco products.

Hence, the FDA controls the import, advertising, sale, packaging, distribution, labeling, and manufacture of all such products. Its regulations also cover the parts and components of ENDS. However, it excludes all accessories. Some examples of such components include:

  • Battery
  • Atomizer
  • Cartomizer
  • Cartridge
  • Clearomizer
  • Tank System
  • Drip Tip
  • Programmable software

4.   FDA Tobacco Regulations

Businesses that produce, modify fabricate, mix, fix, assemble, repack, label, import, or relabel ENDS must also abide by the requirements for manufactures, in addition to the first three laws.

If your company falls into this category, the FDA considers you a tobacco product “manufacture.” Even companies that import finished tobacco products must comply just like tobacco products distributors or manufacturers.

Therefore, you’ll have to register your company and submit the list of products, advertisements, and labeling. Per the regulations, other details you’ll need to submit include an ingredient listing and data.

5.   Protecting American Lungs And Reversing the Youth Tobacco Epidemic Act

In February 2020, the U.S House of Representatives approved a bill to tackle the youth tobacco crisis. The name of this bill was the Protecting American Lungs and Reversing the Youth Tobacco Epidemic Act of 2020.

It bans most flavored tobacco and vaping products such as mint and menthol flavor. Plus, it imposes taxes on nicotine e-cigarettes and affects vape companies.

Conclusion

One vital fact to always keep in mind, law and regulations are always subject to modification via the passing of new legislation, federal decisions, ballot initiatives, high court rulings, or other approved methods. Therefore, It’s always necessary to follow the latest developments and know current information.

Often, understanding the complex rules and how they affect your business can be challenging. Therefore, you may need an attorney in addition to your legal research to clear all your doubts.


#CBD #Hemp
https://cannatechtoday.com/laws-vape-company-u-s/
June 4, 2021 11:00 am

Mark Your Calendars: The Cannabis Extraction Virtual Conference

Mark Your Calendars: The Cannabis Extraction Virtual Conference

On June 29, 2021, Cannabis Industry Journal is hosting the Cannabis Extraction Virtual Conference. From Noon to 5 pm EST, you’ll get access to five veterans of the extraction market discussing a variety of topics related to the ins and outs of extracting cannabis and hemp.

Hear from subject matter experts who will share their perspectives on cannabis and hemp extraction, supercritical CO2 extraction, post-processing, risk management, hazards and controls, optimization, closed loop hydrocarbon extraction, machine learning algorithms and more.

Alex Hearding, Chief Risk Management Officer at the National Cannabis Risk Management Association (NCRMA) will kick things off with a session exploring the Hazards and Controls of Extraction with Liquified Petroleum Gases. Dr. Markus Roggen, Founder & CEO of Complex Biotech Discovery Ventures, will follow that up with a discussion surrounding the kinetics and thermodynamics of cannabis extraction.

Other talks from the Cannabis Extraction Virtual Conference include:

  • The Quest to Discover the Limnits of CO2 Extraction
    • Jeremy Deihl, co-founder & CTO of Green Mill Supercritical
  • The Future of Cannabis Concentrates: Developments in Hydrocarbon Extraction and Manufacturing
    • Michelle Sprawls, Laboratory Director at CULTA
  • Process Scale Up in the Cannabis/Hemp Industry
    • Darwin Millard, Committee ViceChair on ASTM International’s D37.04 on Processing & Handling of Cannabis

You can check out the agenda in its entirety and register here. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask speakers questions during the live Q&A session that follows each session. Registration is complimentary. For sponsorship opportunities, contact RJ Palermo at [email protected]

The post Mark Your Calendars: The Cannabis Extraction Virtual Conference appeared first on Cannabis Industry Journal.


#CBD #Hemp

Mark Your Calendars: The Cannabis Extraction Virtual Conference


June 2, 2021 5:11 pm

CU Boulder, Charlotte’s Web Begin Sleep & Anxiety Studies

CU Boulder, Charlotte’s Web Begin Sleep & Anxiety Studies

Charlotte’s Web Holdings announced a new collaboration with the University of Colorado-Boulder and their Research and Education Addressing Cannabis and Health (REACH) Center. The University’s REACH Center will conduct a preclinical study on how hemp oil can influence sleep quality and anxiety.

Charlotte’s Web and University of Colorado-Boulder Collaborative Study to Assess CBD and CBN’s Potential to Support Improved Sleep (CNW Group/Charlotte’s Web Holdings, Inc.)

The study will use Charlotte’s Web hemp products, including their full spectrum hemp formulations containing CBN, CBD and less than 0.3% THC. Monika Fleshner, PhD, Professor of Integrative Physiology and member of the Center for Neuroscience at the University of Colorado, will be the project lead and will conduct the study in her Stress Physiology Laboratory. “There is a great need for properly controlled experimental studies that are designed to test the potential neural and physiological impacts of hemp derived phytocannabinoids,” says Dr. Fleshner. “With support from CU REACH and Charlotte’s Web, our research will explore both the efficacy and mechanisms of how these substances can affect complex brain-mediated behavior, such as disturbed sleep.”

Tim Orr, senior vice president of Charlotte’s Web and president of its CW Labs division, is currently working on more than twelve scientific research studies with the company. “Charlotte’s Web is committed to advancing science on the benefits and safety of CBD and other hemp phytocannabinoids through rigorous scientific investigations such as this sleep and anxiety study,” says Orr. “We’re honored to team up with CU’s REACH Center to explore the potential impacts of full-spectrum hemp extract with CBD and CBN on anxiety and sleep quality.”

Long term, Charlotte’s Web expects this study will help build the foundation for future clinical studies to “better understand how specific ratios of cannabinoids and different delivery formats are effective at supporting improved sleep quality and instilling healthier sleep architecture in humans,” reads the press release.

The post CU Boulder, Charlotte’s Web Begin Sleep & Anxiety Studies appeared first on Cannabis Industry Journal.


#CBD #Hemp

CU Boulder, Charlotte’s Web Begin Sleep & Anxiety Studies


June 2, 2021 4:39 pm

Different Ways Hemp Can be Utilized as House-Building Materials

Different Ways Hemp Can be Utilized as House-Building Materials

Hemp is a miracle material. When most people think of it, one or two uses might come to mind. But, when you really do your research on everything hemp is used for, you quickly start to see how valuable it is.

Right now, it’s important to shine a light on the fact that hemp can be used for home construction in a variety of ways. Lately, the cost of lumber has skyrocketed due to a shortage. There are also concerns about the sustainability of traditional building materials and how they might be impacting the planet.

Could hemp be the solution for those problems? Yes.

Using hemp as a building material is more than just a “pipe dream” (no pun intended). Instead, it’s a viable option that could cut costs and benefit the environment.

Not sure how it can be used and whether it truly is the right solution? Let’s look at the benefits and a few ways hemp can be implemented into construction materials.

The Benefits of Hemp for Building

If you think hemp can’t hold a candle to lumber or other building materials, think again. Nowadays, hemp is used to manufacture:

  • Rope
  • Textiles
  • Bioplastics
  • Insulation

There’s are several reasons why it’s being used to make so many things. First, it’s both fire and mold-resistant. That’s important if you live in a damp environment. Plus, it allows builders to rely less on using chemical fire retardants, which can cost money and be harmful to the environment.

Hemp can also be used to upgrade your home with new additions. It’s a much safer construction product than materials used in the past. For example, hemp can be used to replace old insulation that might contain asbestos.

If your home was built before the 1970s, you may have insulation or other building materials containing asbestos, which can cause damage to your respiratory system and may even cause cancer or mesothelioma. Hemp is a natural, safe, and healthy replacement.

If you’re building from the ground up, using materials like hempcrete can also be beneficial for the environment.

Sustainability is important, especially in the construction industry. But, so is cost. With lumber prices on the rise, can you save money by using hemp instead?

Sustainable Savings

Part of the reason why hemp is more cost-effective than other materials is that it’s sustainable. It’s a renewable resource that makes it easier to stay on a realistic budget with your home construction. A hemp-made house costs roughly the same as a normally-built house. Now, with rising material costs, it may be even cheaper than traditional options.

Materials like hempcrete are more commonly used for smaller projects, making them a big draw for tiny homes. If you’re on a strict budget or you have bad credit, using hemp to build your home can help you to avoid overspending. You might also be able to build or buy even if you have bad credit because you’ll be able to put down a larger downpayment.

It’s also important to note that the hemp tech industry is rapidly growing. In the future, that could mean even more hemp-based building materials for housing. Currently, hemp wood companies are becoming more prominent, creating everything from flooring to cabinets.

Hemp is also being used to replace certain plastic materials, which will also impact the building industry and how materials are used. If you’re not ready to build a home or upgrade right now, keep your eyes open for how hemp is going to grow (again, literally) in the future.

Hemp and Your Home Can Go Hand-in-Hand

Hemp is sustainable. It’s cost-effective. It’s growing in popularity, and it’s even got its own tech industry. Needless to say, it’s a trendy topic right now in the construction world. But, on a more personal level, hemp can be a fantastic addition to your home – inside or outside.

For example, because hemp wood is becoming more popular, you can use it to decorate your home’s interior. It can give you a more “rustic” and natural look that fits perfectly into a sustainability mindset. Natural wood accents are perfect for shabby chic homes, and they can make your space feel warmer and more inviting.

Because hemp is also used to create textiles, you can decorate with it. Some of the most common hemp fabrics include:

  • Linen
  • Terrycloth
  • Twill
  • Cotton muslin

From your sheets to your curtains, you could end up having a hemp home top to bottom and feel good about the environmentally sound choices you’re making.

If you’ve never considered hemp for building, now is a perfect time to do your research. If you’re already interested in the hemp industry, constructing a home using hemp building materials could be the next step in utilizing it. The more popular it becomes, the more we’re likely to see it as a strong competitor to traditional costly materials.


#CBD #Hemp
https://cannatechtoday.com/hemp-house-building-materials/
May 31, 2021 11:00 am

Tax Analysis of the MORE Act

Here’s a very good analysis of Rep. Nadler’s new version of the MORE Act from the Tax Foundation: Less Should be MORE with Federal Cannabis Taxation.

A five-percent excise tax to the Feds is a very small vigorish to pay in exchange for descheduling, legal banking, protection from RICO suits and prosecution, and especially the loss of 280E thereby allowing normal business tax deductions for Cannabis companies.

The net federal tax to a commercial marijuana company is substantially reduced by the MORE Act, even including the 5-8% federal excise tax.

Being able to deduct operating expenses could lower marijuana companies’ federal tax burden to 35% from 70%. Hopefully consumers will see some of that savings. The increase in ROI of that 5% is 35%, a seven-fold return. Homegrowers won’t be paying that tax, only commercial operators and imports (plus duty).

The social equity provisions stripped by Rep. Gaetz in the last version of the MORE Act, an attempt to compensate for the profoundly racist impact of marijuana prohibition the last 84 years, are back. The benefits are not race-specific, but defined more by marijuana criminal convictions and class.

Here’s an analysis of each state’s marijuana tax policy the from Tax Foundation.


Here’s my analysis of the current version of the MORE Act

Although we’ll never get “our” XXI Amendment, or “our” DSHEA, this preamble to the new MORE Act is a pretty good start:

“The Congress finds as follows:

(1) The communities that have been most harmed by cannabis prohibition are benefiting the least from the legal marijuana marketplace.

(2) A legacy of racial and ethnic injustices, compounded by the disproportionate collateral consequences of 80 years of cannabis prohibition enforcement, now limits participation in the industry.

(3) 37 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands have 10 adopted laws allowing legal access to cannabis, and 15 States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, and Guam have adopted laws legalizing cannabis for adult recreational use.

(4) A total of 47 States have reformed their laws pertaining to cannabis despite the Schedule I status of marijuana and its Federal criminalization.

 (5) Legal cannabis sales totaled $20,000,000,000 in 2020 and are projected to reach $40,500,000,000 by 2025.

 (6) According to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), enforcing cannabis prohibition laws costs taxpayers approximately $3.6 billion a year.

 (7) The continued enforcement of cannabis prohibition laws results in over 600,000 arrests annually, disproportionately impacting people of color who are almost 4 times more likely to be arrested for cannabis possession than their White counterparts, despite equal rates of use across populations.

(8) People of color have been historically targeted by discriminatory sentencing practices resulting in Black men receiving drug sentences that are 13.1 percent longer than sentences imposed for White men and Latinos being nearly 6.5 times more likely to receive a Federal sentence for cannabis possession than non-Hispanic Whites.

(9) In 2013, simple cannabis possession was the fourth most common cause of deportation for any offense and the most common cause of deportation for drug law violations.

(10) Fewer than one-fifth of cannabis business owners identify as minorities and only approximately 4 percent are black.

(11) Applicants for cannabis licenses are limited by numerous laws, regulations, and exorbitant permit applications, licensing fees, and costs in these States, which can require more than $700,000.

(12) Historically disproportionate arrest and conviction rates make it particularly difficult for people of color to enter the legal cannabis market-place, as most States bar these individuals from participating.

(13) Federal law severely limits access to loans and capital for cannabis businesses, disproportionately impacting minority small business owners.

(14) Some States and municipalities have taken proactive steps to mitigate inequalities in the legal cannabis marketplace and ensure equal participation in the industry.

10 SEC. 3. DECRIMINALIZATION OF CANNABIS.11 (a) CANNABIS REMOVED FROM SCHEDULE OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES.—” […]

What’s the 5-8% excise tax going to fund? This:

“PART OO—COMMUNITY REINVESTMENT GRANT PROGRAM
SEC. 3052. AUTHORIZATION.
(a) IN GENERAL.—The Director of the Cannabis Justice Office shall establish and carry out a grant program, known as the ‘Community Reinvestment Grant Program’, to provide eligible entities with funds to administer services for individuals adversely impacted by the War on Drugs, including—
(1) job training;
(2) reentry services;
(3) legal aid for civil and criminal cases, including expungement of cannabis convictions;
(4) literacy programs;
(5) youth recreation or mentoring programs; and
(6) health education programs.
(b) SUBSTANCE USE DISORDER SERVICES.—The Director, in consultation with the Secretary of Health and Human Services, shall provide eligible entities with funds to administer substance use disorder services for individuals adversely impacted by the War on Drugs or connect patients with substance use disorder services. Also eligible for such services are individuals who have been arrested for or convicted of the sale, possession, use, manufacture or cultivation of a controlled substance other than cannabis (except for a conviction involving distribution to a minor).”

In the last version of the MORE Act, Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) gutted the following social equity provisions:

“SEC. 3053. FUNDING FROM OPPORTUNITY TRUST FUND.
The Director shall carry out the program under this part using funds made available under section 9512(c)(1)9 and (2) of the Internal Revenue Code.
SEC. 3054. DEFINITIONS.
In this part:
(1) The term ‘cannabis conviction’ means a conviction, or adjudication of juvenile delinquency, for a cannabis offense (as such term is defined in section 13 of the Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement Act of 2021).
(2) The term ‘eligible entity’ means a nonprofit organization, as defined in section 501(c)(3)19 of the Internal Revenue Code, that is representative of a community or a significant segment of a community with experience in providing relevant services to individuals adversely impacted by the War on Drugs in that community.
(3) The term ‘individuals adversely impacted by the War on Drugs’ has the meaning given that term in section 6 of the Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement Act of 2021.”

At the current estimate of $20 billion in states with regulated marijuana and assuming that the price holds firm despite massive savings in cost and risk, (and besides the $3.6 Billion in enforcement cost savings) that additional $1 billion the first year is going to:

“(1) 50 percent to the Attorney General to carry out section 3052(a) of part OO of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968.
[~$500 million, for job training, reentry services, legal aid for civil and criminal cases, including expungement of cannabis convictions, literacy programs, youth recreation or mentoring programs, and health education programs, see above]

(2) 10 percent to the Attorney General to carry out section 3052(b) of part OO of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968.
[~$100 million, for substance use disorder services (rehab), see above]

(3) 20 percent to the Administrator of the Small Business Administration to carry out section 6(b)(1) of the Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement Act of 2021.
[~$200 million, for SBA loans and technical assistance for individuals adversely impacted by the War on Drugs, “CANNABIS RESTORATIVE OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM”]

(4) 20 percent to the Administrator of the Small Business Administration to carry out section 6(b)(2) of the Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement Act of 2021.
[~$200 million, for SBA to use to provide any eligible State or locality funds to develop and implement equitable cannabis licensing programs that minimize barriers to cannabis licensing and employment for individuals adversely impacted by the War on Drugs, “EQUITABLE LICENSING GRANT PROGRAM”]

Ironically, once implemented marijuana entrepreneurs with pot-growing felonies will not only be allowed into marijuana programs, unlike in the hemp industry, but SBA will also give them money to do it. Yes, just like before the 2018 Farm Bill, adult-use marijuana will again be more legal to grow than hemp. Congress should take this opportunity to fix what it hath wrought for hemp in the 2018 Farm Bill, such as allowing drug felons and 1% max THC.

Congress recognizes how badly the states failed on social equity for those most impacted by marijuana laws, instead often rewarding the wrong people for the wrong reasons:

“(b) CANNABIS RESTORATIVE OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM; EQUITABLE LICENSING GRANT PROGRAM.
(1) CANNABIS RESTORATIVE OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM.—The Administrator of the Small Business Administration shall establish and carry out a program, to be known as the ‘‘Cannabis Restorative Opportunity Program’’, to provide loans and technical assistance under section 7(m) of the Small Business Act (15 U.S.C. 636(m)) to assist small business concerns owned and controlled by socially and economically disadvantaged individuals that operate in eligible States or localities.
(2) EQUITABLE LICENSING GRANT PROGRAM.— The Administrator of the Small Business Administration shall establish and carry out a grant program, to be known as the ‘‘Equitable Licensing Grant Program’’, to provide any eligible State or locality funds to develop and implement equitable cannabis licensing programs that minimize barriers to cannabis licensing and employment for individuals adversely impacted by the War on Drugs, provided that each grantee includes in its cannabis licensing program at least four of the following elements:
(A) A waiver of cannabis license applications fees for individuals who report an income below 250 percent of the Federal Poverty Level for at least 5 of the past 10 years and who are first-time applicants for a cannabis license.
(B) A prohibition on the denial of a cannabis license based on a conviction for a cannabis offense that took place prior to State legalization of cannabis or the date of enactment of this Act, as appropriate.
(C) A prohibition on restrictions for licensing relating to criminal convictions except with respect to a criminal conviction related to owning and operating a business.
(D) A prohibition on cannabis license holders engaging in suspicion less cannabis drug testing of their prospective or current employees, except with respect to drug testing for safety-sensitive positions required under part 40 of title 49, Code of Federal Regulations.
(E) The establishment of a cannabis licensing board that is reflective of the racial, ethnic, economic, and gender composition of the eligible State or locality, to serve as an oversight body of the equitable licensing program.”
[…]

Release and expunge, including juveniles:

“SEC. 10. RESENTENCING AND EXPUNGEMENT. (a) EXPUNGEMENT OF NON-VIOLENT FEDERAL CANNABIS OFFENSE CONVICTIONS FOR INDIVIDUALS NOT UNDER A CRIMINAL JUSTICE SENTENCE.
(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 1 year after the date of the enactment of this Act, each Federal district shall conduct a comprehensive review and issue an order expunging each conviction or adjudication of juvenile delinquency for a non-violent Federal cannabis offense entered by each Federal court in the district before the date of enactment of this Act and on or after May 1, 1971. Each Federal court shall also issue an order expunging any arrests associated with each expunged conviction or adjudication of juvenile delinquency.
(2) NOTIFICATION.—To the extent practicable, each Federal district shall notify each individual whose arrest, conviction, or adjudication of delinquency has been expunged pursuant to this subsection that their arrest, conviction, or adjudication of juvenile delinquency has been expunged, and the effect of such expungement.
(3) RIGHT TO PETITION COURT FOR EXPUNGEMENT.—At any point after the date of enactment of this Act, any individual with a prior conviction or adjudication of juvenile delinquency for a non-violent Federal cannabis offense, who is not under a criminal justice sentence, may file a motion for expungement. If the expungement of such a conviction or adjudication of juvenile delinquency is required pursuant to this Act, the court shall expunge the conviction or adjudication, and any associated arrests. If the individual is indigent, counsel shall be appointed to represent the individual in any proceedings under this subsection.
(4) SEALED RECORD.—The court shall seal all records related to a conviction or adjudication of juvenile delinquency that has been expunged under this subsection. Such records may only be made available by further order of the court.
(b) SENTENCING REVIEW FOR INDIVIDUALS UNDER A CRIMINAL JUSTICE SENTENCE.
(1) IN GENERAL.—For any individual who is under a criminal justice sentence for a non-violent Federal cannabis offense, the court that imposed the sentence shall, on motion of the individual, the Director of the Bureau of Prisons, the attorney for the Government, or the court, conduct a sentencing review hearing. If the individual is indigent, counsel shall be appointed to represent the individual in any sentencing review proceedings under this subsection.”
[…]
“(c) EFFECT OF EXPUNGEMENT.—An individual who has had an arrest, a conviction, or juvenile delinquency adjudication expunged under this section— (1) may treat the arrest, conviction, or adjudication as if it never occurred; and (2) shall be immune from any civil or criminal penalties related to perjury, false swearing, or false statements, for a failure to disclose such arrest, conviction, or adjudication.”
[…]

It would be great if the above could be done even posthumously, so families can clear the name of a dead relative.

Even those ashamed of using a specific Mexican term in use since the 1850s over a general European one get a bone tossed their way, handing long-dead Harry Anslinger a linguistic win:

“SEC. 11. REFERENCES IN EXISTING LAW TO MARIJUANA OR MARIHUANA.
Wherever, in the statutes of the United States or in the rulings, regulations, or interpretations of various administrative bureaus and agencies of the United States—(1) there appears or may appear the term ‘‘marihuana’’ or ‘‘marijuana’’, that term shall be struck and the term ‘‘cannabis’’ shall be inserted; and
(2) there appears or may appear the term ‘‘Marihuana’’ or ‘‘Marijuana’’, that term shall be struck and the term ‘‘Cannabis’’ shall be inserted.”

All in all, it’s damn fine bill worthy of our support. Especially after 84 years of a racist unconstitutional law with a devastating impact on society. No ethical commercial grower should oppose this over 5% excise tax when they get so much more in return.

Challenges with Process Scale Up in Cannabis/Hemp Extraction

Challenges with Process Scale Up in Cannabis/Hemp Extraction

What makes scaling up your process so difficult?

There are many factors that can lead to the challenges people face when scaling up their processes. These challenges are not unique to the cannabis/hemp industry, but they are exacerbated by the consequences generated from decades of Reefer Madness. In my time operating in the cannabis/hemp space, 15+ years, I have seen established equipment vendors and sellers of laboratory supplies, like Sigma-Aldrich (now Millipore-Sigma), Fisher-Scientific, Cerilliant, Agilent, and others, go from reporting individuals inquiring about certified reference materials to setting up entire divisions of their companies to service the needs of the industry. Progress. But we are still a fledgling marketplace facing many challenges. Let’s look at a few specific to process scale up.

Darwin Millard will deliver a presentation on this topic during the Cannabis Extraction Virtual Conference on June 29. Click here to learn more.Equipment Availability: Lack of available equipment at larger and larger process scales can severely impact project timelines. Making not only equipment acquisition difficult, but also limiting the number of reputable equipment manufacturers you can work with.

Non-Linear Expansion: NEVER assume your process scales linearly. Perhaps one of the most avoidable mistakes during process scale up. You will quickly find that for many processes you cannot just put in a larger unit and expect a proportional increase in output. This is because as process equipment increases so to must utilities and other supporting infrastructure, but not only that, process vessel geometry, proportions, and design are contributing factors to process efficiency as your scale of operations increases.

Hazardous Material Quantities: Just as important to the process as the equipment are the solvents and reagents used. As your scale of operations increases so does your demand and production of hazardous materials; solvents including carbon dioxide (CO2), ethanol, and liquid petroleum gases (LPG) like Butane and Propane are obvious hazards, but so too are the refrigerants used in the chillers, fuels used to power generators, steam created to heat critical systems, and effluents and wastewater discharged from the process and supporting systems. Not every municipality wants thousands of gallons of flammable substances and hazardous waste being generated in their backyard…

Contractor/Vendor Misrepresentation: Finding out in the middle of you project that your contractor or equipment vendor has never set up a system at this scale before is never a good feeling. Unfortunately, contractor and vendor misrepresentation of qualifications is a common occurrence in the cannabis/hemp space.

If all this was not bad enough, all too often the consequences of improper planning and execution are not felt until your project is delayed or jeopardized due to misallocation of funds or undercapitalization. This is especially true when scaling up your production capacity. Now let’s look at some ways to avoid these mistakes.

The Rule of 10

Construction drawings for a piece of process equipment.

When scaling up your process, NEVER assume that a simple linear expansion of your process train will be sufficient. It is often the case that process scale up is non-linear. Using the Rule of 10 is one way of scaling up your process through a stepwise iterative approach. The Rule of 10 is best explained through an example: Say you are performing a bench-top extraction of a few grams and want to scale that up to a few thousand kilograms. Before jumping all the way to your final process scale, start by taking a smaller jump and only increase your bench-top process by a factor of 10 at a time. So, if you were happy and confident with your results at the tens of grams scale, perform the same process at the hundreds of grams scale, then the thousands of grams scale, tens of kilograms scale, and so forth until you have validated your process at the scale of operations you want to achieve. By using the Rule of 10 you can be assured that your process will achieve the same yields/results at larger and larger scales of operation.

Scaling up your process through an iterative approach allows you to identify process issues that otherwise would not have been identified. These can include (but by no means should be considered an exhaustive list) improper heat transfer as process vessels increase in size, the inability to maintain process parameters due to inadequately sized utilities and/or supporting infrastructure, and lower yields than expected even though previous iterations were successful. However, this type of approach can be expensive, especially when considering custom process equipment, and not every processor in the cannabis/hemp space is going to be in the position to use tools like the Rule of 10 and instead must rely on claims made by the equipment vendor or manufacture when scaling up their process.

The Cannabis/Hemp Specific Process Equipment Trap

How many times have you heard this one before: “We have a piece of process equipment tailor-made to perform X,Y,Z task.”? If you have been around as long as I have in the cannabis/hemp space, probably quite a few times. A huge red flag when considering equipment for your expansion project!

Unless the equipment manufacturer is directly working with cannabis/hemp raw materials, or with partners who process these items, during product development, there is no way they could have verified the equipment will work for its purported use.

GMP compliant phytocannabinoid processing facility underconstruction.

A good example of this are ethanol evaporation systems. Most manufacturers of evaporators do not work with the volumes of ethanol they claim their systems can recover. So how did they come up with the evaporation rate? Short answer – Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer, and Fluid Mechanics. They modeled it. This much surface area, plus this much heat/energy, with this much pressure (or lack thereof), using this type of fluid, moving through this type of material, at this rate of speed, gets you a 1000-gal/hr evaporator or some other theoretical value. But what is the real rate once an ethanol and cannabis/hemp solution is running through the system?

For a straight ethanol system, the theoretical models and experimental models are pretty similar – namely because humans like alcohol – extensive real-world data for ethanol systems exist for reference in designing ethanol evaporators (more accurately described as distillation systems, i.e. stills). The same cannot be said for ethanol and cannabis/hemp extract systems. While it is true that many botanical and ethanol systems have been modeled, both theoretically and experimentally, due to prohibition, data for cannabis/hemp and ethanol systems are lacking and the data that do exist are primarily limited to bench-top and laboratory scale scenarios.

So, will that 1000-gal/hr evaporator hit 1000-gal/hr once it is running under load? That’s the real question and why utilizing equipment with established performance qualifications is critical to a successful process scale up when having to rely on the claims of a vendor or equipment manufacturer. Except this is yet another “catch 22”, since the installation, operational, and performance qualification process is an expensive endeavor only a few equipment manufacturers servicing the cannabis/hemp market have done. I am not saying there aren’t any reputable equipment vendors out there; there are, but always ask for data validating their claims and perform a vendor qualification before you drop seven figures on a piece of process equipment on the word of a salesperson.

Important Takeaways

Improper design and insufficient data regarding process efficiencies on larger and larger scales of manufacturing can lead to costly mistakes which can prevent projects from ever getting off the ground.

Each aspect of the manufacturing process must be considered individually when scaling your process train because each element will contribute to the system’s output, either in a limiting or expansive capacity.

I go further into this topic in my presentation: Challenges with Process Scale Up in the Cannabis/Hemp Industry, later this month during Cannabis Industry Journal’s Extraction Virtual Conference on June 29th, 2021. Here I will provide real-world examples of the consequences of improper process scale up and the significance of equipment specifications, certifications, and inspections, and the importance of vendor qualifications and the true cost of improper design specifications. I hope to see you all there.

Until then. Live long and process.

The post Challenges with Process Scale Up in Cannabis/Hemp Extraction appeared first on Cannabis Industry Journal.


#CBD #Hemp

Challenges with Process Scale Up in Cannabis/Hemp Extraction


May 27, 2021 4:24 pm

Eteros Technologies Launches the New Mobius M9 Sorter in Las Vegas

Eteros Technologies Launches the New Mobius M9 Sorter in Las Vegas

What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas.

This won’t be the case, however, for the new Mobius M9 Sorter, which was displayed at Eteros Technologies’ “Demo in the Desert” exhibition on May 13 in Las Vegas.

In fact, this innovative cannabis processing equipment will make cultivator’s jobs a whole lot easier, and will not just be limited to those who reside in Nevada.  

“We hope our ‘Demo in the Desert’ event showed what is possible for the industry going forward,” said Eteros Founder and CEO Aaron McKellar. “There are solutions out there for our growers to be even better, faster, and more efficient than ever before.”

Eteros Technology, which is the parent company of Mobius, plans to hire a dozen full-time employees for its Las Vegas facility, and more job opportunities will arise with future plans to branch out.

“The M9 Sorter is assembled right here in Las Vegas for our U.S. customers,” said Dana Mosman, director of marketing and sales for Eteros. “This automated technology is essential for the hemp and cannabis industry in a burgeoning and competitive marketplace.”

The Mobius M9 Sorter will be a game-changer for cannabis and hemp cultivators and process, as its many functions allow for the machine to handle more product in less time while increasing accuracy in sizing.

M9’s features include:

  • An industry-leading 9 sorting belts
  • An industry-leading 78” sorting zone for high-speed and precise sizing of product
  • A longer sorting table that leads to more accurate results
  • Every grading slot is longer, creating more opportunity for an accurate sort, and each grading partition is fully adjustable
  • All stainless steel construction
  • Sanitary construction for GMP workflows
  • Adjustable infeed hopper: tool-free adjustment and removal for feeding or conveyor infeed
  • Reversible table for operation in either left or right outfeed configuration
  • Easy access for cleaning with safety interlocked end panels and rear door
  • 7” HMI color controller
  • Accurately grades up to 200KG/HR
  • Quick and tool-free removal of all belts and rollers for easy and safe cleaning.

You know the cannabis industry must be booming when products like the M9 Sorter are created with cultivators in mind.

With more growers able to efficiently produce more and more cannabis and hemp to meet consumer demand, this means a more sustainable, healthy future.

For being a so-called desert, Nevada is starting to look pretty green.


#CBD #Hemp
https://cannatechtoday.com/eteros-technologies-launches-the-new-mobius-m9-sorter-in-las-vegas/
May 27, 2021 11:01 am

qPCR Better Than Agar for Microbiolgy Analysis

Benchmarking qPCR to Culture: PDA [agar medium] vs DRBC

“The State of Michigan is in the process of scrutinizing molecular methods and culture based methods for the detection of Total Yeast and Mold (TYM) on cannabis. They chose to run this study on DiChloro Rose Bengal with Chloramphenicol (DRBC). The chloramphenicol is an antibiotic. This can be helpful to eliminate the bacteria which can form obscuring colonies in 24 hours while yeast and molds can take 5-10 days. Unfortunately, chloramphenicol also inhibits the growth of fungi and it inhibits the most dangerous fungi on cannabis (Aspergillus, Penicillium and Fusarium).

As expected the Aspergillus species either did not grow or took 12 days to grow on DRBC. PDA was able to detect them all. PCR failed to detect Rhizopus oryzae.

After sharing these data with AOAC, they suggested an independent review. This study evaluated the same cannabis matrix plated on 3 different plates. This was performed by an independent laboratory under AOAC guidance.

1) DRBC with Chloramphenicol (CAMP)
2) PDA with Chloramphenicol (CAMP)
3) PDA alone

You can see a LOG scale more colonies on PDA with CAMP than with DRBC. This demonstrates the carbon sources in DRBC which are known to starve yeast and molds are in fact starving yeast and molds and therefor under count microbial risks.

You can also see a LOG scale more organisms on PDA without selection. This is 100 fold more CFU. Some of these may be bacteria or yeast and molds that are sensitive to Chloramphenicol.

This is important to consider in light of ITS qPCR. ITS qPCR can also vary by organism due to copy number variation in the ITS regions but this copy number variation is not 100 fold variant as you will observe by simply shifting the carbon source used for plating. ITS qPCR can also amplify any organism while only a sub percentage of the organisms can culture. This is known as The Great Plate Count Anomaly (Staley and Konopka, 1985). Even high throughput systems that attempt to culture organisms in multiple different culture broths, fail to exceed culturing more than 14% of the microbial content present in a sample (Connon and Giovannoni, 2002). These highly parallel culture systems are too cumbersome to deploy in routine food testing so a single carbon source or plating type is often used instead. The choice of that plating method will greatly vary making this as a suggested “gold standard” that is undefined.

We performed additional platings of Botrytis cinerea on the 3 different medias (PDA vs PDA-CAMP vs DRBC-CAMP. In the past, we have noticed this very common cannabis pathogen did not plate in 3 days on Rapid YM plates. As a result, MGC designed PathoSEEK TYM test to have independent Botrytis primers to afford better benchmarking for medias which fail to grow this. These primer can be run independently for Botrytis confirmation. We are working on methods to pool these primers into the TYM FAM channel foe use in states that use media that can grow Botrytis. One can see low to no growth on DRBC but excessive growth on PDA. These were grown for 5 days. No colonies were observed on DRBC in 3 days (72 hours). The same volumes were plated on all medias.

Conclusions
These data demonstrate that migration to DRBC as a ‘gold standard’ for benchmarking other TYM detection technologies is flawed. The failure to detect the most dangerous human pathogenic organisms found on cannabis was noted with organisms ordered directly from ATCC. This problem is further exacerbated in real world cannabis samples as these organisms are usually endophytes which live inside the plant. It is difficult to extract Aspergillus from within the cannabis plant and still maintain its viability. In this case, even if the Aspergillus were viable, it wouldn’t grow on DRBC.

The use of chloramphenicol selection in cannabis microbial testing presents clinical risk to cannabis patients and patient safety.”

Read at: https://www.medicinalgenomics.com/benchmarking-qpcr-to-culture-pda-vs-drbc/

Increasing Global Lumber Prices May Help Hemp Industry

Increasing Global Lumber Prices May Help Hemp Industry

Lumber has been one of the most common building materials in construction for a very long time.

It is not the most popular building material on earth, as that distinction goes to concrete. However, wood is still very popular and has been for centuries.

Houses, wagons, bridges, and a number of other things have been made out of wood in many different countries throughout the world both historically and currently.

Unfortunately, prices for lumber have increased exponentially this year, which may ultimately prove to be a blessing to the global hemp industry.

Exploding Prices for Lumber

Lumber is a commodity that is traded around the world. Virtually every country on earth uses lumber for various purposes.

Using the NASDAQ as a measure, the cost of lumber has nearly tripled in just the last year.

If you have visited a home improvement store or lumberyard in the last year to make a purchase, then the sticker shock you experienced really hammered things home (no pun intended).

Fortunately for builders across the planet, there is a building material alternative that is much better for the environment.

Hemp As A Building Material

When many folks think about hemp, they tend to think of hemp products like rope, paper, and clothing.

In recent years, demand for hemp has skyrocketed thanks to the increased popularity of CBD products. Many CBD products are derived from hemp.

However, there’s another use for hemp that is likely to gain in popularity thanks in part to increased lumber prices: hemp as a building material.

The inner woody fibers from hemp plants can be used to make boards similar to wood boards, often referred to as ‘hemp board.’

Another use for hemp in building materials is for making hempcrete, which is similar to concrete yet is much more earth-friendly.

Hemp grows much faster than trees, and in many cases is more pest and fire-resistant. Historically, prices for hemp building materials are more than lumber, but the gap is closing more and more with every passing month.


#CBD #Hemp
https://cannatechtoday.com/lumber-prices-help-hemp-industry/
May 19, 2021 11:00 am

The New Delta 8 THC Market: A Q&A with the Founders of DeltaVera

The New Delta 8 THC Market: A Q&A with the Founders of DeltaVera

Delta 8 THC (delta-8-tetrahydrocannabinol) sprung onto the scene late last year in a big way. While similar to the much more widely-known delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol that produces a lot of the psychoactive effects associated with ingesting cannabis, delta 8 THC can be derived from hemp with less than 0.3% delta 9 THC. Given the legality of hemp-derived products following the 2018 Farm Bill, delta 8 THC can be produced in some states where delta 9 THC still remains illegal.

While delta 8 is considerably different in its psychoactive effects from its cousin, it does overlap in some ways. It can still produce some more manageable, less “heady” versions of delta 9’s effects like euphoria and relief found in the many medical applications of cannabis. DeltaVera, a company that launched less than six months ago, aims to share that more manageable THC experience with the masses.

The sharp rise of the delta 8 market means that DeltaVera is poised for growth. With distribution contracts inked, exciting partnerships in the works and a large surge in consumer demand, the founders of DeltaVera are at the ready to capitalize on this lesser-known molecule and bring it to the forefront of the nascent hemp industry. Starting out as a small family business, Sam and Craig Andrus launched DeltaVera with their third founder, PK Isacs.

We sat down with Sam Andrus and PK Isacs, two of the founders of DeltaVera, an award-winning brand, to ask them about their plans for expanding, how they became entrepreneurs and why they think delta 8 is the next big thing in cannabis.

Cannabis Industry Journal: Tell me about your company. How did you get started in the cannabis space?

Sam Andrus, cofounder of DeltaVera

Sam Andrus: I had an early start in the Delta 8 THC industry on the sales side. We knew we wanted to get into the market, but observed a number of aspects in the space that needed to be addressed: the most important being quality control, transparency and brand trust. With this as a backdrop we launched DeltaVera. Highly curated, approachable, transparent and value-oriented with a strong focus on reliability and trust. The DeltaVera family is made up of three operating managers and the sales team. We are three founders with complementary skill sets: Craig, who has domain expertise in finance, governance and startups, PK who has experience in business and marketing and my sales experience round out the management team.

We have yet to solicit outside capital and have funded ourselves internally as we create our brand and refine our product offering. That said, we are seeing numerous opportunities in strategic partnerships and expansion, which will require additional capital. And we are excited to start this expansion process.

CIJ: What makes the Delta 8 space so remarkable? Why are your SKUs primarily formulated with Delta 8?

Sam Andrus & PK Isacs: Delta 8 THC is an alternative/complement to delta 9 THC, CBD and other cannabinoids. Its status as non-federally scheduled and its less potent psychoactive effects make it appealing in its own right. Delta 8 THC can help with healthier sleep patterns and with pain management in a way that CBD can’t, without a strong “head high” that many of our customers like to avoid. Additionally, it’s shorter lived and doesn’t give you any negative residual effects, which makes it beneficial for people on tighter schedules. These factors make it easier for us to approach markets that are inaccessible to both delta 9 THC and CBD, such as older demographics. In a world where delta 9 is legal, there will still be a place for delta 8.

PK Isacs, cofounder of DeltaVera

While we are very proud of our suite of smokable products, we are currently focusing our efforts on edibles: our Delta Discs are our mainstay, though we are expanding our product line to include nano-emulsion products such as liquid shots and nano gummies. They strongly appeal to our target demographics; additionally, the edible market is growing very quickly in states that allow the sale of hemp-derived consumables.

CIJ: Continuing on the delta 8 front – right now it is considered a cannabinoid legal for interstate commerce, much like CBD, correct? Do you think that will change? 

Sam & PK: That is currently the case. Delta 8 THC is newer, and as such, it has even more ambiguity in regards to its legal future. But what’s most exciting (and our most challenging task right now), is informing consumers about the benefits of delta 8. We are one of a few companies solely focused on the consumption of delta 8, because of its similar benefits to delta 9 and CBD – our products are the perfect happy medium: a high with less psychoactive effects and all the health benefits of both, making it a desirable alternative to all consumers.

In addition, we are looking at some combinations of delta 8/CBDA, delta 8/CBN, delta 8/THCV and are very excited to begin test marketing these combinations. These proprietary blends of minor/major cannabinoids can cater to a niche target demographic as they can be curated to have very specific and unique effects when combined in the right quantities with the right delivery system. They will also be able to serve a larger customer base as these cannabinoids can all be derived from hemp.

CIJ: How do you think the FDA would regulate your product? Do you welcome federal oversight?

DeltaVera gummy products

Sam & PK: Regardless of whether or not we are regulated we are committed to a high level of transparency and trust. As noted in unregulated markets, like the supplement market, you don’t always know what you are getting in terms of purity and potency. We are changing that paradigm by adding unique QR codes to our sustainable containers which reference COAs [certificates of analyses] specific to the contents of the case. A lot of the space is naturally trying to avoid that kind of regulatory interference, but we are currently doing our best to self-regulate and make sure that our consumers are fully informed about what they’re receiving.

We will be the first to say that there aren’t as many laws governing delta 8 THC as there could be, and that’s why we’ve spent so much time and money on self-regulation. All of our products have very clear nutritional information in addition to test results down to one hundredth of one percent. As for what category these products should fall under: we have a wide range of products, and each one has its place under a different umbrella of regulation. We hope that the federal government will take advantage of the vast array of studies that have been conducted on delta 8 THC since it was first extracted in 1942 to step up to this product that is, in our experience, helping so many people.

CIJ: Tell me about how your business has grown so far.

Sam & PK: When we sell to a retailer, we try to provide them with as much material as possible on what delta 8 THC is and what differentiates DeltaVera’s products. Still, we’ve had some difficulty in places with limited delta 8 THC exposure. That being said, when someone tries our product, there is a high likelihood that they become a repeat customer (and they tell their friends). Given our newness to the market (Our brand launched in January 2021) initial indications are – we have a good rate of repeat orders, and we’ve heard the same from our brick-and-mortar partners.

The DeltaVera Delta Discs

Our distribution network has grown tremendously; we’ve taken a three-pronged approach to distribution: partnerships with like-minded companies in compatible spaces, an e-commerce market on our website, and a commission-based sales structure to reach brick-and-mortar establishments. To date, most of our distribution takes place in the latter two spaces, due to the added time and commitment involved in forming partnerships. As a company we are taking a more creative approach on how we present our product and alternative ways to consume it. We have some exciting collaborations in the works; follow us on social media to stay up to date with everything on the horizon. We are very enthusiastic about our partnerships however, with our first collaboration with WaxNax, a Denver-based company revolutionizing the cannabis dabbing experience, hitting the shelves this week.

CIJ: What is your marketing plan?

Sam & PK: We are working on building a social media presence. Natalie, who is leading the charge on social media, recommended we take an organic approach to build our base. We want to avoid falling into the “paid ad”, “spam” vibe as long as we can. We are currently focused on building a community through delta 8. Our mission is making DeltaVera a brand for all lifestyles, athletes, creatives, travelers or business professionals. We’re confident in our product, and have faith that it can speak for itself.

CIJ: How do you ensure quality in your products?

Sam & PK: Our products are of guaranteed quality with our licensed growers and manufacturers. We provide COAs, informing the retailer & consumer about each product, displaying full panel tests on cannabinoids and heavy metals. These preliminary and secondary lab tests ensure our product is below 0.3% delta 9 THC in all our products. Through third-party labs, we run full panel tests which pick up a variety of cannabinoids; for most of our products we focus on the level/purity of delta 8. Our products are screened for both contaminants and heavy metals.

All this information is housed conveniently on our website that can be reached through our QR codes.

CIJ: What are your plans to grow the business in the future? 

Sam & PK: We feel very confident in our three methods of distribution: partnerships, e-commerce and a commission-based sales structure. We’ve made tremendous ground on partnerships, and are very excited about numerous partnerships we have in the pipeline. We’ve reached out to some incredible groups in the CBD space, the THC space and a few groups that you wouldn’t normally associate with cannabinoids, but with whom we’ve workshopped some really creative ideas that we’re really looking forward to bringing to market.

Readers can use promo code “CIJ” to get 15% off their first order here

The post The New Delta 8 THC Market: A Q&A with the Founders of DeltaVera appeared first on Cannabis Industry Journal.


#CBD #Hemp

The New Delta 8 THC Market: A Q&A with the Founders of DeltaVera


May 17, 2021 11:14 pm

Defining Hemp: Classifications, Policies & Markets, Part 2

Defining Hemp: Classifications, Policies & Markets, Part 2

In Part 1 of this series we answered the question: What is “hemp”; and addressed some of the consequences of defining “hemp” as a thing. In Part 2, I will explore this topic in more detail and provide some commonsense definitions for several traditional hemp products based on a classification approach rather than separating “cannabis” from “hemp”.

Classifications, Specifications, and Test Methods – Establishing Market Protections for Hemp Products Through Standardization

Does making a distinction between “hemp” and “cannabis” make it easier to protect the interests of the seed and fiber markets?

On the face of it, this question seems obvious. Yes, it does.

Up to this point in history, the bifurcation of the cannabis plant into resin types and non-resin types has served to provide protections for the seed and fiber markets by making it easier for producers to operate, since the resins (the scary cannabinoids, namely d9-THC) were not involved. Today, however, the line in the sand, has been washed away, and “hemp” no longer only refers to non-resin producing varieties of the cannabis plant.

The structure of cannabidiol (CBD), one of 400 active compounds found in cannabis.

As more and more hemp marketplaces come online with varying limits for d9-THC the need for standardization becomes even more pressing. Without standardization, each marketplace will have its own requirements, forcing businesses looking to sell their products in multiple jurisdictions to comply with each region’s mandates and adds a significant level of burden to their operations.

Providing an internationally harmonized definition for hemp is an important first step but allowing the d9-THC limit to vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction has some unintended (or intended) consequences (#NewReeferMadness). These discrepancies between legal marketplaces will inevitably lead to the establishment of global trade regions; where, if your product cannot meet the definition of “hemp” in that region, then you could effectively be barred from participating in it.

A process which has already started. Harmonizing around 0.3% is great for the US, Canada, and European Union, but what about other stakeholders outside of these markets?

And, at what point does the conflict of hemp from one region with a d9-THC content of 0.3% and hemp from another region with a d9-THC content of 1% being sold into the same market become a problem?

Perhaps a better long-term solution for protecting the market interests of “hemp product” stakeholders would be to establish specifications, such as identity metrics, total cannabinoid content, especially d9-THC, and other quality attributes which have to be verified using test methods for a product to be classified as “hemp”. This system of standards (classifications, specifications, and test methods) would allow for more innovation and make it significantly easier for cannabis raw materials that meet these specifications to find a use rather than being sent to the landfill. Bolstering advancements and opening the door for more market acceptance of the cannabis plant, its parts, and products.

An Alternative Approach to Defining Hemp

Below are some proposed definitions related to common terminology used in the hemp marketplace based on the concept that there are no hemp plants, there are only cannabis plants that can be classified as hemp, and hemp products are simply cannabis products that meet certain specifications to allow them to be classified and represented as hemp.

  • Hemp, n—commercial name given to a cannabis plant, its parts, and products derived therefrom with a total d9-THC content no more than the maximum allowable limit for the item in question. (Maybe not the best definition, but it makes it clear that not only does the limit for d9-THC vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction it varies from product type to product type as well.)
  • Hemp flower, n—commercial name for the inflorescence of a cannabis plant that can be classified as hemp.
  • Hemp seed, n—commercial name for the seeds of a cannabis plant which are intended to be used to grow another cannabis plant that can be classified as hemp.
  • Hempseed, n—commercial name for the seeds of a cannabis plant which are intended to be used as food or as an ingredient in food.
  • Hemp seed oil, n—commercial name for the oils expressed from the seeds of a cannabis plant.
  • Hemp seed cake, n—commercial name for the solid material byproduct generated during the expression of the oil from the seeds of a cannabis plant.
  • Hemp flour/meal/dietary-fiber, n—commercial name for the powdered seed cake of a cannabis plant intended to be used as a food or as an ingredient in food with a protein content no more than 35% by weight.
  • Hemp protein powder, n—commercial name for the powdered seed cake of a cannabis plant intended to be used as a food or as an ingredient in food with a protein content between 35% and 80% by weight.
  • Hemp protein isolate, n—commercial name for the powdered seed cake of a cannabis plant intended to be used as a food or as an ingredient in food with a protein content above 80% by weight.
  • Hemp fiber, n—commercial name for the cellulosic-based natural fibers of a cannabis plant.
  • Hemp shives, n—commercial name for the hurd of a cannabis plant which have been processed to defined specifications.
  • Hempcrete, n—commercial name for a solid amalgamation of various aggregates and binders, typically comprised of the hurd (shives) of a cannabis plant and lime.

The d9-THC limits for each product were purposefully omitted because these specifications still need to be defined for each product type. Leaving the d9-THC limit up to each authority having jurisdiction, however, is not the answer. It is fine if you comply with a lower d9-THC limit and want to sell into a market with a higher d9-THC limit, but what do you do if you are above the limit for the market you want to sell into? For now, you lose out on potential revenue.

Hemp-derived CBD extract

I am not advocating that everyone starts selling “hemp” as “cannabis,” or vice versa, far from it. I am advocating for a more commonsense and inclusive approach to the marketplace though. One that would allow for the commercialization of materials that would normally be going to waste.

To me it is simply logical. There are no hemp plants, there are only cannabis plants that can be classified as hemp. There are no hemp products, there are only cannabis products that can be classified as hemp. In order for a cannabis product to be marketed, labeled, and sold as a hemp product, i.e. to be classified as a hemp, it would need to meet a set of specifications and be verified using a set of test methods first. But fundamentally the product would be a cannabis product being certified as “hemp”. And that is the shift in thinking that I am trying to get across.

Exclusionary Actions – Disenfranchising Stakeholders

The cannabis plant is an amazing plant and to fully capitalize on the potential of this crop we have to start allowing for the commercialization of cannabis raw materials that are not controlled by the UN Single Conventions, i.e. the seeds, stalks, roots, and leaves when not accompanied by the fruiting tops or the resin glands. Not to do so disenfranchises a significant number of stakeholders from participating in established legal avenues of trade for these goods. A concept proposed and endorsed the ASTM D37 in the published standard D8245-19: Guide for Disposal of Resin-Containing Cannabis Raw Materials and Downstream Products.

If you are stakeholder in the hemp marketplace, you may feel threatened by the idea of the market getting flooded with material, but how are the demands of the so called “green economy” going to be met without access to more supply? Organic hemp seed for food production is scarce but there is plenty of conventional hemp seed for the current demand, but what happens when hempmilk is positioned to displace soymilk in every major grocery store? To feed the growth of the human population and allow for a transition to a truly “green economy,” we need to ensure that the policies that we are putting in place are not excluding those looking to participate in the industry and disenfranchising stakeholders from burgeoning marketplaces, nor alienating a segment of the marketplace simply because their plant cannot be classified as “hemp”.

Until next time…

Live long and process.

The post Defining Hemp: Classifications, Policies & Markets, Part 2 appeared first on Cannabis Industry Journal.


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Defining Hemp: Classifications, Policies & Markets, Part 2


May 13, 2021 2:35 pm

Canopy Didn't Mean To Mislead Investors, Judge Says

Canopy Didn't Mean To Mislead Investors, Judge Says A New Jersey federal judge has granted major pot company Canopy Growth’s bid to escape an investor class action accusing it of misleading them about the strength of the Canadian cannabis market, ruling the investors didn’t show that the company intentionally deceived them. #CBD #Hemp https://www.law360.com/cannabis/articles/1383075?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=section May 10, 2021 7:59 pm

CBD Co. Agrees To Pay $500K Over Health Claims

CBD Co. Agrees To Pay $500K Over Health Claims Cannabis company Cannacraft agreed to pay more than $500,000 in penalties to settle charges brought by a California consumer protection task force accusing it of improperly marketing CBD products as treatments for cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and more. #CBD #Hemp https://www.law360.com/cannabis/articles/1383109?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=section May 10, 2021 4:11 pm

4 Firms Guide Trulieve's $2.1B Deal For Pot Industry Peer

4 Firms Guide Trulieve's $2.1B Deal For Pot Industry Peer Trulieve Cannabis Corp. will absorb Harvest Health & Recreation Inc. for roughly $2.1 billion to create a premier player in the U.S. pot industry, the companies said Monday, in a transaction put together with help from four law firms. #CBD #Hemp https://www.law360.com/cannabis/articles/1382968?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=section May 10, 2021 11:04 am

Virginia Marijuana Retailer License

Virginia Marijuana Retailer License

Virginia Marijuana Retailer License

Virginia marijuana retailer license

Virginia Marijuana Retailer License

Recently -on April 7- HB 2312 and SB 1406 were voted to be approved after Gov. Ralph Northam requested amendments from the legislature. 

This bill will replace cannabis prohibition with a system to legalize, tax, and regulate cannabis for adults 21 and older. 

Many — but not all — of the law’s provisions require a second legislative vote in 2022, or “re-enactment.” The provisions to legalize cannabis possession and cultivation on July 1, 2021 do not require re-enactment, nor do penalties for minors possessing cannabis and provisions to allow the regulatory work to start. The provisions to begin the regulatory structure and to legalize sales on January 1, 2024 also do not require re-enactment. Most new penalties — such as for bringing any cannabis into Virginia — do require re-enactment.

What is a Virginia marijuana retailer license?

A Retail marijuana store license, authorizes the licensee to purchase or take possession of retail marijuana, retail marijuana products, immature marijuana plants, or marijuana seeds from a marijuana wholesaler and to sell retail marijuana, retail marijuana products, immature marijuana plants, or marijuana seeds to consumers on premises approved by the Board.

RELATED POST: VIRGINIA MARIJUANA CULTIVATION LICENSE

RELATED POST: MINNESOTA CANNABIS LICENSES

Do you need guidance?

How to apply for a Virginia marijuana retailer license

According to the newest legislation on the matter, here is the information regarding the application for a marijuana retailer license:

  • Every person intending to apply for any license authorized by the newest legislation has to file with the Board an application on forms provided by the Board and a statement in writing by the applicant swearing and affirming that all of the information contained therein is true.
  • Applicants for licenses for establishments that are otherwise required to obtain an inspection by the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services shall provide proof of inspection or proof of a pending request for such inspection.
    • If the applicant provides proof of inspection or proof of a pending request for an inspection, a license may be issued to the applicant. If a license is issued on the basis of a pending application or inspection, such license shall authorize the licensee to purchase retail marijuana, retail marijuana products, immature marijuana plants, or marijuana seeds; however, the licensee shall not sell retail marijuana, retail marijuana products, immature marijuana plants, or marijuana seeds until an inspection is completed.
  • Each applicant for a license has to post a notice of his application with the Board on the front door of the building, place, or room where he proposes to engage in such business for no more than 30 days and not less than 10 days. 
    • Such notice shall be of a size and contain such information as required by the Board, including a statement that any objections shall be submitted to the Board not more than 30 days following initial posting of the notice required pursuant to this subsection.
    • The applicant shall also cause notice to be published at least once a week for two consecutive weeks in a newspaper published in or having a general circulation in the county, city, or town wherein such applicant proposes to engage in such business. 
    • Such notice shall contain such information as required by the Board, including a statement that any objections to the issuance of the license be submitted to the Board not later than 30 days from the date of the initial newspaper publication.
  • The Board shall conduct a background investigation, to include a criminal history records search, which may include a fingerprint-based national criminal history records search, on each applicant for a license. 
    • The Board may waive, for good cause shown, the requirement for a criminal history records search and completed personal data form for officers, directors, nonmanaging members, or limited partners of any applicant corporation, limited liability company, or limited partnership. 
    • In considering criminal history record information, the Board shall not disqualify an applicant because of a past conviction for a marijuana-related offense.
    • The Board shall notify the local governing body of each license application through the town manager, city manager, county administrator, or other designee of the locality. 
    • Local governing bodies shall submit objections to the granting of a license within 30 days of the filing of the application.
  • Each applicant shall pay the required application fee at the time the application is filed, except that such fee shall be waived or discounted for qualified social equity applicants pursuant to regulations promulgated by the Board. 
    • The license application fee shall be determined by the Board and shall be in addition to the actual cost charged to the Department of State Police by the Federal Bureau of Investigation or the Central Criminal Records Exchange for processing any fingerprints through the Federal Bureau of Investigation or the Central Criminal Records Exchange for each criminal history records search required by the Board. Application fees shall be in addition to the state license fee and will not be refunded.
  • All licensees shall file and maintain with the Board a current, accurate record of the information required by the Board and notify the Board of any changes to such information in accordance with Board regulations.
  • Every application for a permit granted shall be on a form provided by the Board. Such permits shall confer upon their holders no authority to make solicitations in the Commonwealth.
  • The fee for a temporary permit shall be one-twelfth of the combined fees required by this section for applicable licenses to sell retail marijuana or retail marijuana products computed to the nearest cent and multiplied by the number of months for which the permit is granted.

The Board has the authority to increase state license fees. The Board shall set the amount of such increases on the basis of the consumer price index and shall not increase fees more than once every three years. Prior to implementing any state license fee increase, the Board shall provide notice to all licensees and the general public of (i) the Board’s intent to impose a fee increase and (ii) the new fee that would be required for any license affected by the Board’s proposed fee increases. Such notice shall be provided on or before November 1 in any year in which the Board has decided to increase state license fees, and such increases shall become effective July 1 of the following year.

State regulation 

A new Cannabis Control Authority would be created in July 2021 to regulate the adult-use cannabis market. A Board of Directors would issue regulations; grant, suspend, or revoke licenses. 

The Board would establish the number of licensees, which could not exceed 400 retailers, 25 wholesalers, 450 cultivators, and 60 product manufacturers. This would be without counting existing medical cannabis businesses and hemp processors. It would also approve labs. 

It creates two types of cultivation licenses: Class A licenses, which are capped at a certain number of square feet or plants. Class B would be limited to 1% THC. 

It will also establish criteria to evaluate new licensees based on the density of retail stores in the community and to consider any negative public health outcomes in the community. 

  • Vertical integration (owning multiple types of cannabis businesses) would not be allowed except in the case of: 
    • Microbusinesses 
    • Existing medical cannabis businesses, all of which are vertically integrated, and hemp processors may be vertically integrated if they: 1) pay a $1 million fee to the Virginia Cannabis Equity Loan Fund and the Virginia Cannabis Equity Reinvestment Fund; and 2) the business submits a diversity, equity, and inclusion plan to the Cannabis Business Equity and Diversity Support Team and implements it or provides job training services to persons recently incarcerated. 
  • Stores must be geographically dispersed. Their dispersion must be reassessed after every 100 licenses are issued. 
  • Promotes inclusion in licensing by prioritizing social equity applicants. 
    • The bill denes “social equity applicants” as having 66% or more owners who: have a prior cannabis conviction, have a close relative with a cannabis conviction, live either in an area with disproportionate cannabis arrests or that is economically distressed, or graduated from a Virginia HBCU. 
    • Social equity applicants will be given preference from July 1, 2023 until January 1, 2024. Regulators will waive a percent of fees. 
  • Creates a Cannabis Business Equity and Diversity Support Team to identify barriers to inclusion, oer technical assistance, conduct outreach, and develop requirements for diversity, equity, and inclusion plans. 
  • A new 21-member Cannabis Public Health Advisory Council would assess and monitor public health impacts and make recommendations, including about warnings cannabis products’ safety and product composition and public health awareness. 
  • The bill includes requirements for seed-to-sale tracking, packaging, and labeling —including for potency and mandating warning labels — and requires state-created information on risks to be available at the point-of-sale. Delivery, internet-based sales, 
  • Rules would govern outdoor cultivation, sanitation, testing, and advertising. 
  • Regulators would also establish public health and safety guidelines for personal home cultivation, including to protect children and prevent  nuisances, including odor. 

Timeframe of the bill

  • Most of the bill — including legal possession — will take effect on July 1, 2021. (The current penalty for possession of up to an ounce is a civil fine of up to $25.) 
  • Sales would begin no earlier than January 1, 2024. 

Taxes established on the bill

  • A state tax of 21% at the point of retail sale would be levied, in addition to standard 6% sales taxes. The tax does not apply to medical cannabis sales from medical dispensaries. 
  • Localities could impose a tax of up to 3% on sales to consumers in the municipality.
  • Fees would be determined by the Board and can be increased based on ination. 
  • After covering regulatory costs, the revenue would be allocated to: pre-K education for at-risk children (40%); a Cannabis Equity Reinvestment Fund (30%); substance abuse treatment and prevention (25%); and public health programs (5%). 
  • The Cannabis Equity Reinvestment Fund, administered by a 20-member Cannabis Equity Reinvestment Board, would direct funds to: 

Scholarship programs for historically marginalized populations, including those who were in foster care and who have been impacted by substance use; 

  • Grants to support jobs training and placement, workplace development, youth mentoring, and reentry services; 
  • Contributing to the state’s Indigent Defense Fund; and 
  • No -and low- interest loans for social equity applicants.

If you want more information regarding what could you do in order to enter the cannabis industry in Connecticut, don’t hesitate to contact us.

If you want to be updated on the current state of Cannabis legalization, you should check out our map of marijuana legality by state.

RELATED POST: OHIO MARIJUANA DISPENSARY LICENSE APPLICATION

RELATED POST: KENTUCKY BAN OF DELTA-8 THC

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Kentucky Ban of Delta-8 THC

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Kentucky Delta-8 THC Hemp Ban Delta-8 THC is illegal according to Kentucky’s interpretation of federal law – at least according to the general counsel of the Department of Agriculture – who really has no authority to make conclusions of federal law. Delta-8 THC has…

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The post Virginia Marijuana Retailer License appeared first on Cannabis Industry Lawyer – Tom Howard.


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Virginia Marijuana Retailer License


May 8, 2021 1:12 am

Cannabis Bill Roundup: Medical Pot Advances In The South

Cannabis Bill Roundup: Medical Pot Advances In The South Lawmakers in a host of southern states this week advanced or approved bills to reform or create a medical cannabis program, while in states where marijuana is already fully legal, legislators are moving ahead with policies allowing for home grow and union participation in the space. Here are the major legislative developments in cannabis from the last week. #CBD #Hemp https://www.law360.com/cannabis/articles/1382639?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=section May 7, 2021 8:55 pm

Medical Pot Co. Says IT Biz Faked Signature In $10M Contract

Medical Pot Co. Says IT Biz Faked Signature In $10M Contract A cannabis sales software company has asked a Pennsylvania federal judge to dismiss a subcontractor’s suit over its termination from a $10 million state contract it said was secured based on its status as a Black-owned IT company, saying the subcontractor forged a signature for an unaccepted counteroffer. #CBD #Hemp https://www.law360.com/cannabis/articles/1382529?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=section May 7, 2021 7:12 pm

UCANN Says It Doesn't Owe Atty Fees After Patent Suit

UCANN Says It Doesn't Owe Atty Fees After Patent Suit United Cannabis Corp. is fighting CBD company Pure Hemp Collective’s bid for $300,000 in attorney fees after United Cannabis dropped a patent infringement suit against the company, arguing it has no liability because Pure Hemp willingly dropped its claims as well. #CBD #Hemp https://www.law360.com/cannabis/articles/1382169?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=section May 6, 2021 5:31 pm

Pot Co. Can't Sell Nerds Knockoff, Calif. Judge Says

Pot Co. Can't Sell Nerds Knockoff, Calif. Judge Says A California cannabis delivery company can’t sell “Medicated Nerds Rope” after the maker of Nerds brand candy filed a trademark infringement suit against the delivery company, a federal judge in Los Angeles has determined. #CBD #Hemp https://www.law360.com/cannabis/articles/1381886?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=section May 6, 2021 5:16 pm

Ex-Mayor's Fraud, Bribery Case Nears End As Defense Rests

Ex-Mayor's Fraud, Bribery Case Nears End As Defense Rests A Massachusetts federal jury could begin deliberations as soon as Monday in the fraud and corruption trial of the former mayor of Fall River, after the ex-politician presented a brief defense against claims he drained investor cash from his startup and extracted bribes from cannabis entrepreneurs looking to open in the city. #CBD #Hemp https://www.law360.com/cannabis/articles/1382135?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=section May 6, 2021 4:28 pm

Ex-Mass. Pot Regulator Joins Vicente Sederberg

Ex-Mass. Pot Regulator Joins Vicente Sederberg One of Massachusetts’ first cannabis regulators has taken a position at cannabis-focused law firm Vicente Sederberg LLP as its first director of regulatory policy, the firm recently announced. #CBD #Hemp https://www.law360.com/cannabis/articles/1381757?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=section May 6, 2021 3:45 pm

The Perfect Cannabis and Plantbased Self-Care Products for Mother’s Day

The Perfect Cannabis and Plantbased Self-Care Products for Mother’s Day

These past two years have been an unprecedented whirlwind to say the least.

Many mothers were forced to adjust to the pandemic’s new normal, which includes juggling work, homeschooling, and parental care, without having the ability to destress outside the home. 

This Mother’s Day, you deserve to be pampered like the queen you are. 

Do a D.I.Y home spa treatment, light some candles, unwind with your favorite strain or tasty CBD gummy.

We picked out some of the best Mother’s Day gifts that will make this holiday a day to remember for you, or another mother in your life.

This could be a nurturing friend, your own mom, a surrogate mother, your adopted mother, heck, pamper yourself for being a good mom to your dogs.

Motherhood isn’t just limited to having a child. 

This is a day to celebrate those who have made an impact on our lives and who have supported us through the good and the bad.

What better way to show unconditional love than through a plant that was cultivated to provide relief and comfort?  

 

Willie’s Remedy Teas: $26

 

Willie’s Remedy Teas. Photo courtesy of Willie’s Remedy Teas.

With cannabis legend Willie Nelson’s stamp of approval, you know this tea is going to hit the spot.

Each tea bag is infused with 12.5 mg of organically grown, full-spectrum hemp, which makes it easy to ensure that you’ll get the same calming effect with each cup.

Willie’s Remedy caffeine-free Teas come in a variety of enticing flavors, such as Breakfast Blend, Sweet Spiced Chai, Classic Green, and more.

You’re going to want all the time in the world to enjoy this tea, so sit back, relax, and relish every drop. 

 

Botanika Life Skin Elixir Set + Crystal Roller Kit Box $275

 

Botanika Life Skin Elixer + Crystal Roller. Photo courtesy of Botanika Life.

Get the cucumbers ready!

This is the perfect for those who want to indulge in some high quality selfcare, while also helping out the environment.

Clean face, Clean Earth!

That’s definitely a win. 

The set gives you three all natural, vegan, gluten-free, organic Full Spectrum CBD skin elixirs that you massage over your skin with the Botanika Life Crystal Face Roller.

The elixirs include Vitamin C + Squalane + 1,000MG CBD, Plant Stem Cell + Marula + 1000MG CBD, and their Elite Elixer + 1500MG CBD.

The full spectrum CBD works to stimulate your skin, providing you with a calming and rejuvenating experience that will leave you refreshed and ready to take on the day. 

 

TerraVita CBD Relax CBD Bath Soak $60

 

TerraVita CBD Relax CBD Bath Soak. Photo courtesy of TerraVita.

It wouldn’t be a complete Mother’s Day without a soothing bubble bath.

TerraVita’s Relax bath salts are made with 250mg of premium Broad Spectrum CBD combined with natural salts, botanicals, and natural oils to relieve stress, anxiety, and clear your mind.

Close your eyes, take in the fresh aromas of lavender and coconut, and let any worries you may be facing drift away. 

 

PHYX Sparkling Water (Available in Colorado) $5.95 per bottle

 

PHYX Sparkling Water. Photo courtesy of PHYX.

Bottoms up!

Enjoy a refreshing THC-Infused sparkling water that allows you to feel the benefits of cannabis in minutes due to Phyx’s proprietary nano-emulsified THC technology.

With zero cannabis taste, zero calories and zero sugar, Phyx works as the perfect healthy base for any delicious Mother’s Day cocktail.

Hint: If you’re looking for a cannabis-infused drink recipe, we have your back.

PHYX comes in a variety of delicious flavors, including grapefruit, lime, dragonfruit, and all natural. 

 

New Chapter Hair, Skin & Nails Fermented Biotin & Beauty Herbs Supplement $29

 

Examples of New Chapter supplements. Photo courtesy of New Chapter.

Practicing self-care isn’t just limited to enhancing your emotional wellbeing, though that is an important part of it.

It’s also about taking care of your physical health.

New Chapter’s Hair, Skin & Nails supplements contain an organic superfood blend of Aloe, Chamomile, Maca, and Reishi Mushroom, combined with Biotin to help nourish your hair, and support healthier, youthful skin.

These vegan, gluten-free capsules are made with ingredients you can trust, and are the perfect addition to any self-care routine. 

 

 

Cannaflower Pre-Rolls $25

Cannaflower Sour Space Candy CBD Pre-Rolls. Photo courtesy of Cannaflower.

It wouldn’t be mother’s day without a pre-roll!

Cannaflower’s Sour Space Candy CBD Pre-Rolls are perfect for anyone who wants some calm in their life without feeling dazed, due to the low THC content in the flower.

Sour Space Candy is rich in terpenes b-Caryophyllene and a-Pinene, which work to produce an all-day calming feel.

With how chaotic these past two years have been, there’s nothing more grounding than cannabis.

We could all use a little more calm in our lives.


#CBD #Hemp
https://cannatechtoday.com/products-for-mothers-day/
May 6, 2021 10:00 am

Ex-Calif. Officials Each Get 2 Years In Pot Permit Bribe Row

Ex-Calif. Officials Each Get 2 Years In Pot Permit Bribe Row Two former California city officials on Wednesday were each sentenced to two years in prison for accepting bribes in exchange for expediting a cannabis dispensary permit application, according to a statement from the U.S. Department of Justice. #CBD #Hemp https://www.law360.com/cannabis/articles/1382009?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=section May 5, 2021 10:52 pm

Pot Connection May Complicate Claims To 'Raw' Brand Name

Pot Connection May Complicate Claims To 'Raw' Brand Name An Arizona federal judge is refusing to end a trademark dispute between a cannabis company and a smoking materials maker over the word “raw,” saying it’s too early to decide if a link to illegal products voided trademark protection. #CBD #Hemp https://www.law360.com/cannabis/articles/1381785?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=section May 5, 2021 8:51 pm

Fla. Pot Legalization, Taxation Fail In Legislature

Fla. Pot Legalization, Taxation Fail In Legislature Several Florida bills meant to legalize and tax recreational cannabis died in committee, killing legalization hopes in that state this year even as cannabis proposals in other states have made big strides. #CBD #Hemp https://www.law360.com/cannabis/articles/1381825?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=section May 5, 2021 6:45 pm

Mass. Mayor Took Cash Bribe Stuffed In Clipboard, Jury Told

Mass. Mayor Took Cash Bribe Stuffed In Clipboard, Jury Told The former mayor of Fall River, Massachusetts, shook down a proposed retail cannabis shop for a six-figure bribe in exchange for giving the business his blessing to open, swinging by personally to pick up a stack of cash stuffed into a metal clipboard, a Boston jury heard Wednesday. #CBD #Hemp https://www.law360.com/cannabis/articles/1381699?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=section May 5, 2021 5:01 pm

Compliance Co. Fyllo Hires Curaleaf Atty As CLO

Compliance Co. Fyllo Hires Curaleaf Atty As CLO Compliance cloud platform Fyllo has hired as its new chief legal officer a former Vedder Price attorney who most recently held an executive-level business development role at cannabis giant Curaleaf. #CBD #Hemp https://www.law360.com/cannabis/articles/1381294?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=section May 5, 2021 12:08 pm

CBD Co. Wants Initial OK For $300K Deal In Data Breach Row

CBD Co. Wants Initial OK For $300K Deal In Data Breach Row A proposed class of customers has urged a North Carolina federal judge to grant preliminary approval of a $300,000 settlement with hemp products company cbdMD Inc. to resolve claims its customers’ debit and credit card information was compromised by two data breaches in 2020. #CBD #Hemp https://www.law360.com/cannabis/articles/1380949?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=section May 4, 2021 4:13 pm

How Are Cannabis Companies Shipping Delta-9 THC?

How Are Cannabis Companies Shipping Delta-9 THC?

Consumers with no access to recreational marijuana have flocked to hemp-derived Delta-8 products. Delta-8 Sprayed Flower, gummies, drinks, and other products have become common in CBD shops, smoke shops, and vape stores across the country, and consumer demand is just getting started. 

The rapid growth of the Delta-8 market, however, has been met with equally swift bans in several states, and more states are joining that list daily. As Delta-8 sits in a legal gray area, retailers are taking risks by selling these products to consumers, but with the enormous demand, the risk has been worth the reward… so far. 

Store Owners Are Getting Nervous

Some states have taken enforcement actions against retailers already, and more store owners are growing concerned over possible raids. Jay Barrios of No Cap Hemp Co said, “This is nerve-racking. We have lawyers working around the clock. Even then, I still lose sleep at night.” 

A New Solution Enters the Market

With Delta-8 appearing to have a shorter future than the industry had hoped, one company decided to create a product that meets the same consumer demand, and the solution may come as a shock.

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The amount of Delta-9 THC in many Trojan Horse products compares directly to those found in products in a recreational dispensary.

Trojan Horse Cannabis, a product manufacturer out of Colorado, has developed hemp-derived, CBD products with a twist: a significant amount of Delta-9 THC. 

Deciding to double-down on the nature of full spectrum hemp, Trojan Horse launched four products within the last year: a drink mix, a boutique pâte de fruit, a traditional gummy, and a tincture.

The amount of Delta-9 THC compares directly to that of a recreational dispensary (the gummies, for example, have 10 milligrams of Delta 9 THC each), but these products can be bought online and sold in all retail stores where CBD products are legal.

The Legal Landscape

While all of these products have significant Delta-9 THC, they are all still federally legal and defined as hemp products. This is possible due to how the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946 defines hemp and hemp derivatives:

§1639o. Definitions

In this subchapter:

(1) Hemp

The term “hemp” means the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of that plant, including the seeds thereof and all derivatives, extracts, cannabinoids, isomers, acids, salts, and salts of isomers, whether growing or not, with a delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis.”

Checking the COAs, each product comes in well under the 0.3% requirement. In actuality, the Trojan Horse approach isn’t any different than normal full spectrum products. “Our products are just like any other full spectrum CBD product on the market, with the key difference being that we intentionally formulate to the THC milligram, whereas most products are formulated to the CBD milligram,” says Chris Fontes, CEO and Founder of Trojan Horse Cannabis. 

Being under the 0.3% Delta-9 THC limit, these products are legal to sell in CBD shops as well as online, and can even be shipped via USPS or any other common carrier that ships CBD products.

Additionally, Trojan Horse doesn’t use any cannabinoids that could be construed as synthetic. When asked about their input material, Fontes was happy to answer. “All of our hemp products are made from extract only. There’s nothing synthetic, isomerized, or otherwise catalyzed to create what we use. It’s just good old fashioned hemp extract.” 

The Next Big Thing?

Fontes feels they are on the forefront of the next big thing in hemp. “With the unknowns surrounding Delta-8, the industry needs stable products that can fill the impending vacuum that Delta-8 bans are creating. Our products are not in the same legal gray area, and in truth, are simply maximizing the benefit of a full spectrum product,” says Fontes.

Trojan Horse products are available in retail stores, online, and even via bulk, white label, and private label options.

Fontes says, “Delta-8 was a shot in the arm for farmers, processors, and every other part of the supply chain. With our Delta-9 products, we want to bring a more permanent solution to the industry; we want to be a part of the hemp success story.”

It’s an exciting time to be part of the cannabis industry with constant innovation driving new markets, new products, and new services. While most folks are waiting for federal marijuana legalization (or at least decriminalization), the reality is there is no need to wait.

With products like those Trojan Horse is creating, consumers can already purchase Delta-9 THC (the same molecule that has made cannabis popular with human beings since recorded history) online as well as in local stores.

Trojan Horse Cannabis has additional products in the final stages of R&D today and expects to launch several more Delta-9 products soon. 

Images Courtesy of Trojan Horse Cannabis


#CBD #Hemp
https://cannatechtoday.com/shipping-delta-9-thc/
May 4, 2021 11:00 am

Skittles Maker Claims Hemp Co. Violated Its Trademark

Skittles Maker Claims Hemp Co. Violated Its Trademark Candy and gum giant the Wm. Wrigley Jr. Co. filed suit Monday against a cannabis company alleging that its “Zkittlez” name and marketing strategy riffs on the recognizable “Taste the rainbow” ad campaign, thus infringing Wrigley’s trademark for its Skittles candy brand. #CBD #Hemp https://www.law360.com/cannabis/articles/1380980?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=section May 3, 2021 9:38 pm

DC Judge Says Challenge To DEA Hemp Rule In Wrong Court

DC Judge Says Challenge To DEA Hemp Rule In Wrong Court A D.C. federal judge on Monday tossed a suit from hemp industry advocates trying to block the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration from exercising its authority over the crop at certain processing stages, saying only an appeals court had the power to review the matter. #CBD #Hemp https://www.law360.com/cannabis/articles/1380965?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=section May 3, 2021 6:45 pm

ISO/IEC 17025 Accreditation Falls Short for Cannabis Testing Laboratories

ISO/IEC 17025 Accreditation Falls Short for Cannabis Testing Laboratories

What is the role of the Quality Control (QC) Laboratory?

The Quality Control (QC) laboratory serves as one of the most critical functions in consumer product manufacturing. The QC laboratory has the final say on product release based on adherence to established product specifications. Specifications establish a set of criteria to which a product should conform to be considered acceptable for its intended use. Specifications are proposed, justified and approved as part of an overall strategy to ensure the quality, safety, and consistency of consumer products. Subsequently, the quality of consumer products is determined by design, development, Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) controls, product and process validations, and the specifications applied throughout product development and manufacturing. These specifications are specifically the validated test methods and procedures and the established acceptance criteria for product release and throughout shelf life/stability studies.

The Code of Federal Regulations, 21 CFR Part 211, Good Manufacturing Practice for Finished Pharmaceuticals, provides the minimum requirements for the manufacture of safe products that are consumed by humans or animals. More specifically, 21 CFR Part 211: Subpart I-Laboratory Controls, outlines the requirements and expectations for the quality control laboratory and drug product testing. Additionally, 21 CFR Part 117, Current Good Manufacturing Practice, Hazard Analysis, and Risk-Based Preventative Controls for Human Food: Subpart B-Processes and Controls states that appropriate QC operations must be implemented to ensure food products are safe for consumption and food packing materials and components are safe and fit for purpose. Both food and drug products must be tested against established specifications to verify quality and safety, and laboratory operations must have the appropriate processes and procedures to support and defend testing results.

ISO/IEC 17025, General Requirements for the Competence of Testing and Calibration Laboratories is used to develop and implement laboratory management systems. Originally known as ISO/IEC Guide 25, first released in 1978, ISO/IEC 17025 was created with the belief that “third party certification systems [for laboratories] should, to the extent possible, be based on internationally agreed standards and procedures”7. National accreditation bodies are responsible for accrediting laboratories to ISO/IEC 17025. Accreditation bodies are responsible for assessing the quality system and technical aspects of a laboratory’s Quality Management System (QMS) to determine compliance to the requirements of ISO/IEC 17025. ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation is pursued by many laboratories as a way to set them apart from competitors. In some cannabis markets accreditation to the standard is mandatory.

The approach to ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation is typically summarizing the standard requirements through the use of a checklist. Documentation is requested and reviewed to determine if what is provided satisfies the item listed on the checklist, which correlate directly to the requirements of the standard. ISO/IEC 17025 covers the requirements for both testing and calibration laboratories. Due to the wide range of testing laboratories, the standard cannot and should not be overly specific on how a laboratory would meet defined requirements. The objective of any laboratory seeking accreditation is to demonstrate they have an established QMS. Equally as critical, for product testing laboratories in particular, is the objective to establish GxP, “good practices”, to ensure test methods and laboratory operations verify product safety and quality. ISO/IEC 17025 provides the baseline, but compliance to Good Laboratory Practice (GLP), Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) and even Good Safety Practices (GSP) are essential for cannabis testing laboratories to be successful and demonstrate testing data is reliable and accurate.

Where ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation falls short

Adherence to ISO/IEC 17025, and subsequently receiving accreditation, is an excellent way to ensure laboratories have put forth the effort to establish a QMS. However, for product testing laboratories specifically there are a number of “gaps” within the standard and the accreditation process. Below are my “Top Five” that I believe have the greatest impact on a cannabis testing laboratory’s ability to maintain compliance and consistency, verify data integrity and robust testing methods, and ensure the safety of laboratory personnel.

Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs)

The understanding of what qualifies as a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) is often misunderstood by cannabis operators. An SOP is a stand-alone set of step-by-step instructions which allow workers to consistently carry out routine operations, and documented training on SOPs confirms an employee’s comprehension of their job tasks. Although not required per the current version of the standard, many laboratories develop a Quality Manual (QM). A QM defines an organization’s Quality Policy, Quality Objectives, QMS, and the procedures which support the QMS. It is not an uncommon practice for cannabis laboratories to use the QM as the repository for their “procedures”. The intent of a QM is to be a high-level operations policy document. The QM is NOT a step-by-step procedure, or at least it shouldn’t be.

Test Method Transfer (TMT)

Some cannabis laboratories develop their own test methods, but a common practice in many cannabis laboratories is to purchase equipment from vendors that provide “validated” test methods. Laboratories purchase equipment, install equipment with pre-loaded methods and jump in to testing products. There is no formal verification (what is known as a Test Method Transfer (TMT)) by the laboratory to demonstrate the method validated by the vendor on the vendor’s equipment, with the vendor’s technicians, using the vendor’s standards and reagents, performs the same and generates “valid” results when the method is run on their own equipment, with their own technician(s), and using their own standards and reagents. When discrepancies or variances in results are identified (most likely the result of an inadequate TMT), changes to test methods may be made with no justification or data to support the change, and the subsequent method becomes the “validated” method used for final release testing. The standard requires the laboratory to utilize “validated” methods. Most laboratories can easily provide documentation to meet that requirement. However, there is no verification that the process of either validating in house methods or transferring methods from a vendor were developed using any standard guidance on test method validation to confirm the methods are accurate, precise, robust and repeatable. Subsequently, there is no requirement to define, document, and justify changes to test methods. These requirements are mentioned in ISO/IEC 17025, Step 7.2.2, Validation of Methods, but they are written as “Notes” and not as actual necessities for accreditation acceptance.

Change Control

The standard speaks to identifying “changes” in documents and authorizing changes made to software but the standard, and subsequently the accreditation criteria, is loose on the requirement of a Change Control process and procedure as part of the QMS. The laboratory is not offered any clear instruction of how to manage change control, including specific requirements for making changes to procedures and/or test methods, documented justification of those changes, and the identification of individuals authorized to approve those changes.

Out of Specification (OOS) results

The documentation and management of Out of Specification (OOS) testing results is perhaps one of the most critical liabilities witnessed for cannabis testing laboratories. The standard requires a procedure for “Nonconforming Work”. There is no mention of requiring a root cause investigation, no requirement to document actions, and most importantly there is no requirement to document a retesting plan, including justification for retesting. “Testing into compliance”, as this practice is commonly referred to, was ruled unacceptable by the FDA in the highly publicized 1993 court case United States vs. Barr Laboratories.

Laboratory Safety

FDAlogoSafe laboratory practices are not addressed at all in ISO/IEC 17025. A “Culture of Safety” (as defined by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)) is lacking in most cannabis laboratories. Policies and procedures should be established to define required Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), the safe handling of hazardous materials and spills, and a posted evacuation plan in the event of an emergency. Gas chromatography (GC) is a common test method utilized in an analytical testing laboratory. GC instrumentation requires the use of compressed gas which is commonly supplied in gas cylinders. Proper handling, operation and storage of gas cylinders must be defined. A Preventative Maintenance (PM) schedule should be established for eye wash stations, safety showers and fire extinguishers. Finally, Safety Data Sheets (SDSs) should be printed and maintained as reference for laboratory personnel.

ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation provides an added level of trust, respect and confidence in the eyes of regulators and consumers. However, the current process of accreditation misses the mark on the establishment of GxP, “good practices” into laboratory operations. Based on my experience, there has been some leniency given to cannabis testing laboratories seeking accreditation as they are “new” to standards implementation. In my opinion, this is doing cannabis testing laboratories a disservice and setting them up for failure on future accreditations and potential regulatory inspections. It is essential to provide cannabis testing laboratory owners and operators the proper guidance from the beginning and hold them up to the same rigor and scrutiny as other consumer product testing laboratories. Setting the precedence up front drives uniformity, compliance and standardization into an industry that desperately needs it.


References:

  1. 21 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 211- Good Manufacturing Practice for Finished Pharmaceuticals.
  2. 21 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 117;Current Good Manufacturing Practice, Hazard Analysis, and Risk-Based Preventative Controls for Human Food: Subpart B-Processes and Controls.
  3. ICH Q7 Good Manufacturing Practice Guidance for Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients; Laboratory Controls.
  4. World Health Organization (WHO).
  5. International Building Code (IBC).
  6. International Fire Code (IFC).
  7. National Fire Protection Association (NFPA).
  8. Occupational Safety and Health Administration; Laboratories.
  9. ASTM D8244-21; Standard Guide for Analytical Operations Supporting the Cannabis/Hemp Industry.
  10. org; ISO/IEC 17025.

The post ISO/IEC 17025 Accreditation Falls Short for Cannabis Testing Laboratories appeared first on Cannabis Industry Journal.


#CBD #Hemp

ISO/IEC 17025 Accreditation Falls Short for Cannabis Testing Laboratories


May 3, 2021 3:31 pm

PE Firms Want Out Of Pot RICO Suit Against Harvest, Verano

PE Firms Want Out Of Pot RICO Suit Against Harvest, Verano A pair of Canadian private equity firms named in a man’s sprawling racketeering suit alleging cannabis companies Verano Holdings LLC and Harvest Health & Recreation Inc. were responsible for his arrest have asked a federal judge in Colorado to dismiss the case or put it on hold so it can be handled via arbitration. #CBD #Hemp https://www.law360.com/cannabis/articles/1380080?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=section April 30, 2021 9:21 pm

Pot Co.'s $42M NY Greenhouse Buy Steered By 2 Firms

Pot Co.'s $42M NY Greenhouse Buy Steered By 2 Firms In preparation for the launch of New York’s recreational marijuana market, national cannabis company Columbia Care said Friday it is buying a 34-acre greenhouse and cultivation site in a $42.5 million deal guided by Foley Hoag LLP and Farrell Fritz PC. #CBD #Hemp https://www.law360.com/cannabis/articles/1380575?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=section April 30, 2021 7:48 pm

Friday, April 30, 2021 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Friday, April 30, 2021 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

The U.S. Capitol Building is seen facing right into the golden sunlight of early dawn.  The Capitol dome reaches high into a light blue cloudless sky and no people are to be seen. The flag flies at half mast.

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Friday, April 30, 2021 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Key Senate Chair Shifts Stance On Tying Marijuana Banking Bill To Sentencing Reform (Marijuana Moment)

// Louisiana Lawmakers Approve Marijuana Licensing Bill In Anticipation Of Legalization (Marijuana Moment)

// Louisiana Governor Says He Has ‘Great Interest’ In Marijuana Legalization Bill Advancing In Legislature (Marijuana Moment)


These headlines are brought to you by Agilent, a Fortune 500 company known for providing top-notch testing solutions to cannabis and hemp testing labs worldwide. Are you considering testing your cannabis in-house for potency? Agilent is giving away a FREE 1260 HPLC system for one year! If you are a Cultivator, processor, or cannabis testing lab you may qualify for this giveaway. Open up bitly.com/cannabis-contest to answer a few quick questions to enter to win!


// Canadian Cannabis Sales Grow 74% in February to $263 Million (New Cannabis Ventures)

// Maryland Cannabis Industry Grew By 40 Percent in 2020 (Outlaw Report)

// Legal pot in R.I. ‘inevitable’ but may not happen this year State House leaders say (Providence Journal)

// Ascend Wellness Raises $80 Million in IPO (New Cannabis Ventures)

// Gage Cannabis Turns In Solid Fourth Quarter Fiscal Year (Green Market Report)

// Bipartisan Lawmakers Want Federal Protections For Marijuana States In Next Spending Bill (Marijuana Moment)

// Maine Proposal Would Legalize Psilocybin Mushroom Therapy For Adults No Medical Diagnosis Needed (Marijuana Moment)

Check out our other projects:Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement. • Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

Love these headlines? Love our podcast? Support our work with a financial contribution and become a patron.

Photo: Geoff Livingston/Flickr


#CBD #Hemp

Friday, April 30, 2021 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News


April 30, 2021 5:50 pm

CBD Co. Hit With $12M Fraud Suit Over Failed Biz Transaction

CBD Co. Hit With $12M Fraud Suit Over Failed Biz Transaction India Globalization Capital took ownership of a brokerage company owned by Apogee Financial Investments in an effort to break into the cannabis industry, but it didn’t live up to its financial promises, leading to the downfall of the brokerage, according to Apogee’s New York federal lawsuit filed Thursday seeking $12 million. #CBD #Hemp https://www.law360.com/cannabis/articles/1380178?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=section April 29, 2021 10:23 pm

Cannabis Co. Expected To Plead In Ethanol Dumping Case

Cannabis Co. Expected To Plead In Ethanol Dumping Case A California marijuana business plans to plead guilty to charges it illegally dumped more than a dozen barrels of ethanol used in its extraction process, court records show. #CBD #Hemp https://www.law360.com/cannabis/articles/1380055?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=section April 29, 2021 5:25 pm

Defining Hemp: Classifications, Policies & Markets, Part 1

Defining Hemp: Classifications, Policies & Markets, Part 1

What is “hemp”?

The word “hemp” has many meanings. Historically the term has been used as the common name for the Cannabis sativa L. plant. Just like other plants, the cannabis plant has two names, a common name, hemp, and a scientific name, Cannabis sativa L. After the ratification of the UN Single Conventions on Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances, in 1961 and 1972 respectively, the term started to be used to distinguish between resin producing varieties of the cannabis plant and non-resin producing varieties of the cannabis plant. Nowadays the term is generally used to refer to cannabis plants with a delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (d9-THC), a controlled substance, content equal to or less than the maximum allowable limit defined by each marketplace.

Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), just one of hundreds of cannabinoids found in cannabis.

In the United States and Canada, the limit is defined as 0.3% on a dry weight bases, and until November 2020, in the European Union, the limit was defined as 0.2%. After years of effort the “hemp” industry in Europe was successfully able to get the limit raised to 0.3% to be in line with the United States and Canada – creating the largest global trade region for hemp products. But there exist several marketplaces around the world where, either through the consequences of geographic location or more progressive regulations, the d9-THC content in the plant can be substantially higher than 0.3% and still considered “hemp” by the local authority.

To address these variances, ASTM International’s Technical Committee D37 on Cannabis has been working on a harmonized definition of hemp, or industrial hemp, depending on the authority having jurisdiction, through the efforts of its Subcommittee D37.07 on Industrial Hemp. The following is a proposed working definition:

hemp, n—a Cannabis sativa L. plant, or any part of that plant, in which the concentration of total delta-9 THC in the fruiting tops is equal to or less than the regulated maximum level as established by an authority having jurisdiction.

Discussion: The term “Industrial Hemp” is synonymous with “Hemp”.

Note: Total delta-9 THC is calculated as Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9 THC) + (0.877 x Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid).

This definition goes a long way to harmonize the various definitions of hemp from around the world, but it also defines “hemp” as a thing rather than as a classification for a type of cannabis plant or cannabis product. This is a concept rooted in the regulatory consequences of the UN Single Conventions, and one I strongly disagree with.

The definition also leaves the total d9-THC limit open-ended rather than establishing a specified limit. An issue I will address further in this series.

Can “hemp products” only come from “hemp plants”?

If you are an invested stakeholder in the traditional “hemp” marketplace, you would say, yes.

But are there such things as “hemp plants” or are there only cannabis plants that can be classified as “hemp”? (The definition for hemp clearly states that it is a cannabis plant…)

A field of hemp plants, (Cannabis sativa L.)

There is no distinction between the cannabinoids, seeds, and fibers derived from a cannabis plant that can be classified as “hemp” and those derived from a cannabis plant that cannot. The only difference is the word: “cannabis,” and the slew of negative connotations that come along with it. (Negative connotations that continue to be propagated subconsciously, or consciously, whenever someone says the “hemp plant” has 50,000+ uses, and counting, and will save the world because it’s so green and awesome, but not the “cannabis plant”, no that’s evil and bad, stay away! #NewReeferMadness)

The declaration that “hemp products” only come from “hemp plants” has some major implications. “Hemp seeds” can only come from “hemp plants”. “Hemp seed oils” can only come from “hemp seeds”. “Hemp fibers” can only come from “hemp plants”. Etc.

What does that really mean? What are the real-world impacts of this line of thinking?

Flat out it means that if you are growing a cannabis plant with a d9-THC content above the limit for that plant or its parts to be classified as “hemp”, then the entire crop is subjected to the same rules as d9-THC itself and considered a controlled substance. This means that literal tons of usable material with no resin content whatsoever are destroyed annually rather than being utilized in a commercial application simply because a part or parts of the plant they came from did not meet the d9-THC limit.

Some of the many products on the market today derived from hemp

It is well known that d9-THC content is concentrated in the glandular trichomes (resin glands) which are themselves concentrated to the fruiting tops of the plant. Once the leaves, seeds, stalks, stems, roots, etc. have been separated from the fruiting tops and/or the resin glands, then as long as these materials meet the authority having jurisdiction’s specifications for “hemp” there should be no reason why these materials could not be marketed and sold as “hemp”.

There are several reasons why a classification approach to “hemp plants” and “hemp products” makes more long-term sense than a bifurcation of the “cannabis” and “hemp” marketplaces, namely from a sustainability aspect, but also to aid in eliminating the frankly unwarranted stigma associated with the cannabis plant. #NewReeferMadness

That said, say you are a producer making shives from the stalks of cannabis plants that can be classified as “hemp” and then all of a sudden, the market opens up and tons of material from cannabis plants that cannot be classified as “hemp,” that was being sent to the landfill, become available for making shives. Would you be happy about this development? Or would you fight tooth and nail to prevent it from happening?

In this segment, we looked at the history of the term “hemp” and some of the consequences from drawing a line in the sand between “cannabis” and “hemp”. I dive deeper into this topic and provide some commonsense definitions for several traditional hemp products in Part 2 of Defining Hemp: Classifications, Policies & Markets.

The post Defining Hemp: Classifications, Policies & Markets, Part 1 appeared first on Cannabis Industry Journal.


#CBD #Hemp

Defining Hemp: Classifications, Policies & Markets, Part 1


April 29, 2021 3:11 pm

Delta-8 Craze Puts Pot Attorneys On The Spot

Delta-8 Craze Puts Pot Attorneys On The Spot The legal gray area around a new cannabinoid called Delta-8-THC, which can be derived from hemp but promises to get users high, is putting lawyers in a bind as they try to advise clients hoping to take advantage of the new market. #CBD #Hemp https://www.law360.com/cannabis/articles/1377167?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=section April 29, 2021 1:01 pm

Louisiana House Panel Advances Pot Legalization Bill

Louisiana House Panel Advances Pot Legalization Bill A Louisiana state House committee has passed a bill that would allow adults 21 and older to purchase and possess marijuana, as various other proposals related to recreational cannabis make their way through the state legislature. #CBD #Hemp https://www.law360.com/cannabis/articles/1379626?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=section April 28, 2021 9:03 pm

First in the South – Virginia’s Legalization Focuses on Public Safety, Health and Social Justice

First in the South – Virginia’s Legalization Focuses on Public Safety, Health and Social Justice

With the signing of the Cannabis Control Act (the Act) on April 21, 2021, Virginia became the first southern state to legalize adult use cannabis and just the fourth state to do so through the legislature. Legalizing adult use cannabis through the legislature, as opposed to through the ballot box, is not the typical route states have followed up to now. Eleven of the sixteen states and the District of Columbia have legalized adult use cannabis through the use of ballot measures. Virginia joins Vermont, Illinois, New York and New Mexico (which legalized after Virginia) as one of the few states that have gone the legislative route. Under Governor Northam’s administration, the path to legalization was swift, taking less than four months from introduction to passage.

Governor Northam added amendments to the already passed Senate Bill 1406 and the General Assembly voted to approve those amendments, with the Lieutenant Governor breaking the tie in the Senate’s vote. Upon signing, Governor Northam called the law a step towards “building a more equitable and just Virginia and reforming our criminal justice system to make it more fair.” This message and the opportunities to promote social equity through a legal cannabis industry have been consistent points of advocacy made by supporters as the bill advanced to becoming law.

Prior to the Governor’s amendments, the Act under consideration set July 1, 2024 as the date on which both legal possession and adult use sales would begin. The Governor decided to accelerate the date for legal possession to July 1 of this year, a decision believed to have been influenced by data showing that Black Virginians were more than three times as likely to be cited for possession, even after simple possession was decriminalized in the state a year prior. The regulated adult use market is still set to begin making sales on July 1, 2024; however, it remains possible that this date could be advanced through the legislature in the meantime. Nevertheless, Virginia is on track to becoming the first southern state with an operating regulated commercial cannabis market.

Creating an Administrative Structure for the Adult Use Program

Virginia became the first state in the South to legalize adult use cannabis

This sweeping fifty-page law creates the Cannabis Control Authority to regulate the cultivation, manufacture, wholesale and retail sale of cannabis and cannabis product. The Act further lays the groundwork for licensing market participants and regulating appropriate use of cannabis; defining local control; testing, labeling, packaging and advertising of cannabis and cannabis products; and taxation. The Act also contains changes to the criminal laws of the Commonwealth. Companion to the Act are new laws addressing the testing, labeling and packaging of smokable hemp products and manufacturing of edible cannabis products. Additionally, the Cannabis Equity Reinvestment Board was created to address the impact of economic divestment, violence and criminal justice responses to community and individual needs through scholarships and grants.

While persons 21 years or older may possess up to one ounce of cannabis and cultivate up to four plants for personal use per household beginning on July 1, 2021, there are a host of regulations to be written in order to regulate the adult use market. These regulations will be the devil in the details of how the regulated market will work. Regardless, the Cannabis Control Act does establish the framework for adult use cannabis that is unique to Virginia and designed to promote and encourage participation from people and communities disproportionately impacted by cannabis prohibition and enforcement.

The Cannabis Control Authority (CCA) will consist of a Board of Directors, the Cannabis Public Health Advisory Council, the Chief Executive Officer and employees. The Board will have five members appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the legislature, each with the possibility of serving two consecutive five-year terms. The Board is tasked with creating and enforcing regulations under which retail cannabis and cannabis products are possessed, sold, transported, distributed, and delivered. It is expected that the Board will begin discussing regulations next year and that applications for licenses for cannabis cultivation facilities, manufacturing facilities, cannabis testing facilities, wholesalers, and retail stores will begin to be accepted in 2023. Importantly, a Business Equity and Diversity Support Team, led by a Social Equity Liaison, and the Equity Reinvestment Board, led by the Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, are to contribute to a plan to promote and encourage participation in the industry by people from disproportionately impacted communities.

Regulating Participation in the Market

The Act empowers the Board to establish a robust and diverse marketplace with many entry opportunities for market participants. Up to 450 cultivation licenses, 60 manufacturing licenses for the production of retail cannabis products, 25 wholesaler licenses and 400 licenses for retail stores can be granted. These numbers do not include the four permits granted to pharmaceutical processors (entities that cultivate and dispense medical cannabis) under the Commonwealth’s medical program.

Virginia Governor Ralph Northam
Image: Craig, Flickr

In addition to the sheer number of licenses that can be granted, the Act devises a unique approach to addressing concerns of a concentration of licenses in too few hands and a market dominated by large multi-state operators. At the same time, it sets up a mechanism to capitalize two cannabis equity funds intended to benefit persons, families and communities historically and disproportionately targeted and affected by drug enforcement through grants, scholarships and loans. Over-concentration and market dominance concerns are addressed by limiting a person to holding an equity interest in no more than one cultivation, manufacturing, wholesaler, retail or testing facility license. This eliminates the ability of companies to be vertically integrated from cultivation through retail sales operations. However, there are two exceptions to the impediment to vertical integration. First, the Board is authorized to develop regulations that permit small businesses to be vertically integrated and ensure that all licensees have an equal and meaningful opportunity to participate in the market. These regulations will be closely scrutinized by those looking to enter Virginia’s regulated market once they are proposed. Qualifying small businesses could benefit substantially from the economic advantages commensurate with being vertically integrated, assuming they have the access to the capital needed to achieve integration and operate successfully. The second exception allows permitted pharmaceutical processors and registered industrial hemp processors to hold multiple licenses if they pay $1 million to the Board (to be allocated to job training, the equity loan fund or equity reinvestment fund) and submit a diversity, equity and inclusion plan for approval and implementation. Consequently, Virginia is attempting to fund, in part, its ambitious social equity programs by monetizing the opportunity for these processors to participate vertically in the adult use market.

Those devilish details of how this market will function, and how onerous compliance obligations will be, will emanate from those yet to be proposed regulations covering many areas and subject matters including:

  • Outdoor cultivation by cultivation facilities;
  • Security requirements;
  • Sanitary standards;
  • A testing program;
  • An application process;
  • Packaging and labeling requirements;
  • Maximum THC level for retail products (not to exceed 5 mg per serving or 50 mg per package for edible products);
  • Record retention requirements;
  • Criteria for evaluating social equity license applications based on certain ownership standards;
  • Licensing preferences for qualified social equity applicants;
  • Low interest loan program standards;
  • Personal cultivation guidelines; and
  • Outdoor advertising restrictions.

Needless to say, the CCA Board has a lot work ahead in order to issue reasonable regulations that will carry out the dictates in the Act and encourage the development of a well-functioning marketplace delivering meaningful social equity opportunities.

Much work needs to be done before July 1, 2024 to prepare for its debutThe application process for the five categories of licenses will be developed by the Board, along with application fee and annual license fee amounts. It is not clear how substantial these fees will be and what effect they will have on the ability of less-well-capitalized companies and individuals to compete in the market. The Act dictates that licenses are deemed nontransferable from person to person or location to location. However, it is not entirely clear that changes in ownership will be prohibited. The Act contemplates that changes in ownership will be permitted, at least as to retail store licensees, through a reapplication process. Perhaps the forthcoming regulations will add clarity to the transferability of licenses and address the use of management services agreements as a potential workaround to the limitations in license ownership.

Certain requirements particular to certain license-types are worthy of highlighting. For example, there are two classes of cultivation licenses. Class A cultivation licenses authorize cultivation of a certain number of plants within a certain number of square feet to be determined by the Board. Interestingly, Class B licenses are for cultivation of low total THC (no more than 1%) cannabis. Several requirements specific to retail stores are noteworthy. Stores cannot exceed 1,500 square feet, or make sales through drive-through windows, internet-based sales platforms or delivery services. Prohibitive local ordinances are not allowed; however, localities can petition for a referendum on the question of whether retail stores should be prohibited in their locality. Retail stores are allowed to sell immature plants and seek to support the home growers, an allowance that is fairly unique among the existing legal adult-use states.

Taxing Cannabis Sales

Given the perception that regulated cannabis markets add to state coffers, it is little surprise that Virginia’s retail market will be subject to significant taxes. The taxing system is straightforward and not complicated by a taxing regime related to product weight or THC content, for example. There is a 21% tax on retail sales by stores, in addition to the current sales tax rates. In addition, localities may, by ordinance, impose a 3% tax on retail sales. These taxes could result in a retail tax of approximately 30%.

Changes to Criminal Laws

Changes to the criminality of cannabis will have long lasting effects for many Virginians. These changes include:

  • Fines of no more than $25 and participation in substance abuse or education programs for illegal purchases by juveniles or persons 18 years or older;
  • Prohibition of warrantless searches based solely on the odor of cannabis;
  • Automatic expungement of records for certain former cannabis offenses;
  • Prohibition of “gifting” cannabis in exchange for nominal purchases of some other product;
  • Prohibition of consuming cannabis or cannabis products in public; and
  • Prohibition of consumption by drivers or passengers in a motor vehicle being driven, with consumption being presumed if cannabis in the passenger compartment is not in the original sealed manufacturer’s container.

These changes, and others, represent a balancing of public safety with lessons learned from the effects of the war on drugs.

Potpourri

The Act contains myriad other noteworthy provisions. For example, the Board must develop, implement and maintain a seed-to-sale tracking system for the industry. Plants being grown at home must be tagged with the grower’s name and driver’s license or state ID number. Licenses may be stripped from businesses that do not remain neutral while workers attempt to unionize. However, this provision will not become effective unless approved again by the legislature next year. Banks and credit unions are protected under state law for providing financial services to licensed businesses or for investing any income derived from the providing of such services. This provision is intended to address the lack of access to banking for cannabis businesses due to the federal illegality of cannabis by removing any perceived state law barriers for banks and credit unions to do business with licensed cannabis companies.

The adult use cannabis industry is coming to Virginia. Much work needs to be done before July 1, 2024 to prepare for its debut. However, the criminal justice reforms and commitment to repairing harms related to past prohibition of cannabis are soon to be a present-day reality. Virginia is the first Southern state to take the path towards legal adult use cannabis. It is unlikely to be the last.

The post First in the South – Virginia’s Legalization Focuses on Public Safety, Health and Social Justice appeared first on Cannabis Industry Journal.


#CBD #Hemp

First in the South – Virginia’s Legalization Focuses on Public Safety, Health and Social Justice


April 28, 2021 5:20 pm

Wednesday, April 28, 2021 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Wednesday, April 28, 2021 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

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Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Wednesday, April 28, 2021 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Louisiana Lawmakers Approve Marijuana Legalization Bill In Committee (Marijuana Moment)

// Montana Bill To Implement Marijuana Legalization Heads To Governor’s Desk (Marijuana Moment)

// Confirmed: Pennsylvania Is Crushing It In Cannabis (Green Market Report)


These headlines are brought to you by Agilent, a Fortune 500 company known for providing top-notch testing solutions to cannabis and hemp testing labs worldwide. Are you considering testing your cannabis in-house for potency? Agilent is giving away a FREE 1260 HPLC system for one year! If you are a Cultivator, processor, or cannabis testing lab you may qualify for this giveaway. Open up bitly.com/cannabis-contest to answer a few quick questions to enter to win!


// Minnesota Marijuana Legalization Bill Clears Ninth House Committee On Path To Floor (Marijuana Moment)

// Texas Lawmakers Approve Marijuana And Psychedelics Reform Bills (Marijuana Moment)

// Fire & Flower Q4 Revenue Increases 157% to $43.2 Million (New Cannabis Ventures)

// Valens Buys CBD Company In Deal Valued At $60 Million (Green Market Report)

// These License Plates Got the Highest Bids in Colorado’s Cannabis Vanity Plate Auction (Green Entrepreneur)

// Marijuana Packaging Recycling Bill Filed In New York Days After Legalization Takes Effect (Marijuana Moment)

// Seth Rogen Is Making Retro PSAs About How To Safely Consume Marijuana (Bro Bible)

Check out our other projects:Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement. • Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

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Photo: Stuart Seeger/Flickr


#CBD #Hemp

Wednesday, April 28, 2021 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News


April 28, 2021 3:28 pm

Maine Says Medical Pot Rule Doesn't Flout Commerce Clause

Maine Says Medical Pot Rule Doesn't Flout Commerce Clause Maine and a group of local cannabis companies have fired back at claims that the state’s residency rule for medical pot dispensaries violates the U.S. Constitution’s dormant commerce clause, saying there is no national medical marijuana market for the clause to protect. #CBD #Hemp https://www.law360.com/cannabis/articles/1379255?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=section April 27, 2021 8:51 pm

Ohio Marijuana Dispensary License Application

Ohio Marijuana Dispensary License Application

Ohio Marijuana Dispensary License Application

How to Open a Dispensary in Ohio

Ohio marijuana dispensary license

Ohio Marijuana Dispensary License Application

With overwhelming evidence supporting medical marijuana’s potential to improve the qualify of life for Ohio residents, state lawmakers passed House Bill 523 in the summer of 2016. The passage of this law made medical marijuana legal everywhere across the great State of Ohio!

In Ohio, qualified patients may possess and use medical marijuana. State licenced businesses may dispense, cultivate, lab test and process marijuana.

Recently Ohio approved the licensing of 73 new dispensaries, so now is the perfect time to start preparing in order to apply for an Ohio marijuana dispensary license.

Types of Medical Marijuana Business Licenses in Ohio

Currently Ohio has four types of Marijuana Business Licenses available:

  1. Marijuana Cultivators
  2. Marijuana Processors
  3. Marijuana Testing Facilities
  4. Marijuana Dispensary

RELATED POST: KENTUCKY BAN OF DELTA-8 THC

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Do you need guidance?

How to apply for an Ohio marijuana dispensary license

The requirements for a license can change at any moment, so potential applicants are encouraged to check with the Board of Pharmacy. Completed and submitted operation license applications are reviewed by that agency and awarded on a competitive basis based on pre-defined criteria. Applicants must provide the proof of their qualifications.

The Revised Code of Ohio establishes the following requirements in order to apply for a retailer license in Ohio:

  • Pay the application fee
  • Submit the application form
  • Submit documentation sufficient to establish that the applicant is in compliance with the applicable Ohio tax laws and any jurisdiction where the applicant has operated and conducted business within the last three years
  • A financial plan which must include:
    • Financial statements showing the resources of the applicant
    • If the applicant is relying on the money of an owner or board member, evidence that the person has unconditionally committed such money to the use of the applicant in the event that a dispensary license is awarded
    • Documentation from an institution in this state, or any other state in the United States or the District of Columbia, which demonstrates that the applicant has enough money to cover all expenses for the operation (no less than $250,000), and the source of those funds
  • A detailed description of the proposed organizational structure of the proposed dispensary
  • A background check for each owner, officer, or board member of the proposed dispensary
  • Documentation describing the adequacy of the size of the proposed dispensary to serve the needs of patients and caregivers, including -but not limited to- building and construction plans with supporting details
  • Plans for the care, quality, and safekeeping of medical marijuana from delivery to sale
  • A business plan
  • A plan to educate and manage the proposed dispensary on a daily basis
  • A proposal demonstrating how the dispensary will meet the needs of patients and caregivers
  • A detailed description of any other services or products to be offered by the proposed dispensary
  • Documentation related to any program to assist veterans or the indigent in obtaining medical marijuana that the proposed dispensary intends to offer
  • Any other document and information required by the board to determine the applicant’s suitability for licensure or to protect public health and safety

Additional requirements to apply for an Ohio marijuana dispensary license

According to House Bill 523, a person must file an application for each location from which it seeks to operate. In this sense, the application has to comply with section 3796.04 of the Revised Code (mentioned above).

Also, in order to get a license, the applicant has to demonstrate the following:

  • A report of criminal records check was conducted according to the Revised Code, in order to demonstrate:
    • That the person subject to the records check has not been convicted of or pleaded guilty to any disqualifying offenses.
    • If the person has been convicted of or pleaded guilty to a disqualifying offense, this was more than five years before the date the application is filed.
  • The applicant doesn’t have ownership or investment interest in or compensation arrangement with any of the following:
    • A licensed marijuana laboratory
    • An applicant for a license to conduct laboratory testing
  • The applicant doesn’t share any corporate officers or employees with any of the following:
    • A licensed marijuana laboratory
    • An applicant for a license to conduct laboratory testing
  • The applicant won’t be located within five hundred feet of a school, church, public library, public playground, or public park
  • The applicant is in compliance with the state’s tax laws
  • The applicant meets all other licensure eligibility criteria

The Board has to issue at least fifteen percent of retail dispensary licenses to entities owned and controlled -meaning that at least fifty one percent of the business, including corporate stock if a corporation, is owned- by United States citizens who are residents of the state of Ohio and are members of one of the following economically disadvantaged groups:

  • Blacks or African Americans
  • American Indians
  • Hispanics or Latinos
  • Asians

If no applications -or an insufficient number of applications- are filed by these groups, the licenses would be issued according to usual procedures.

Remember: the cannabis industry is heavily regulated and getting help from industry, and business experts is recommendable.

And lastly, don’t miss out on our Marijuana Legalization Map where you can browse the current status of laws in every state in the United States and see all our posts on each of them.

Check Out:

Interested in coming on as a guest? Email our producer at [email protected]

Do you need guidance?

Kentucky Ban of Delta-8 THC

Kentucky Ban of Delta-8 THC

Kentucky Delta-8 THC Hemp Ban Delta-8 THC is illegal according to Kentucky’s interpretation of federal law – at least according to the general counsel of the Department of Agriculture – who really has no authority to make conclusions of federal law. Delta-8 THC has…

Thomas Howard

Thomas Howard

Cannabis Lawyer

Thomas Howard has been in business for years and can help yours navigate towards more profitable waters.

Need A Cannabis Attorney For Your Business?

Our cannabis business attorneys are also business owners.  We can help you structure your business or help protect it from overly burdensome regulations.

The post Ohio Marijuana Dispensary License Application appeared first on Cannabis Industry Lawyer – Tom Howard.


#CBD #Hemp

Ohio Marijuana Dispensary License Application


April 27, 2021 8:34 pm

SD High Court May Be A Litmus Test On Cannabis Initiatives

SD High Court May Be A Litmus Test On Cannabis Initiatives A majority of South Dakotans voted to legalize recreational marijuana on Election Day. After a monthslong legal battle, the state’s Supreme Court on Wednesday will consider whether the ballot measure stands. Here’s how the battle has played out so far, and what it could mean for other states. #CBD #Hemp https://www.law360.com/cannabis/articles/1379318?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=section April 27, 2021 8:21 pm

Feds Want 2½ Years For Ex-Calif. Officials In Pot Permit Bribe

Feds Want 2½ Years For Ex-Calif. Officials In Pot Permit Bribe The federal government has asked a judge to sentence two former California city officials to 30 months in prison with three years of supervised release after they admitted accepting a $35,000 bribe in exchange for expediting a cannabis dispensary permit application. #CBD #Hemp https://www.law360.com/cannabis/articles/1378874?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=section April 27, 2021 5:41 pm

Canadian Cannabis Co. Buys Florida CBD Biz For Up To $60M

Canadian Cannabis Co. Buys Florida CBD Biz For Up To $60M Canadian cannabis extractor Valens will pay as much as $60 million to purchase Florida-based CBD products maker Green Roads, the companies said Tuesday, in a deal guided by Stikeman Elliott, Foley Hoag and Greenberg Traurig. #CBD #Hemp https://www.law360.com/cannabis/articles/1379040?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=section April 27, 2021 5:39 pm

Kentucky Ban of Delta-8 THC

Kentucky Ban of Delta-8 THC

Kentucky Ban of Delta-8 THC

Kentucky Delta-8 THC Hemp Ban

Kentucky Delta-8 THC banDelta-8 THC is illegal according to Kentucky’s interpretation of federal law – at least according to the general counsel of the Department of Agriculture – who really has no authority to make conclusions of federal law.

Delta-8 THC has been very popular in the hemp industry as of lately, however, more and more states recently have been taking actions against Delta-8 THC legality, the most recent one to do it was Kentucky.

On April 19, 2021, the Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA) released a legal opinion letter regarding the legality of Delta-8 THC.

In this post we will briefly go through the recent Kentucky’s ban of Delta-8 THC.

RELATED POST: HOW TO OPEN A DISPENSARY IN MASSACHUSETTS

RELATED POST: HOW TO OPEN A DISPENSARY IN OHIO

Do you need guidance?

About KDA’s Letter Banning Delta-8 THC

KDA’s general counsel starts the discussion regarding the legality of Delta-8 THC making a -faulty- interpretation of federal law, stating:

“As you know, in 2018 Congress created a narrow exemption from the Controlled Substances Act’s definition of “marijuana” (DEA numbers 7350 and 7360) for hemp that contains not more than 0.3% total Delta-9 THC. Cannabis with total Delta-9 THC in excess of that threshold remains a Schedule I substance.

There is no equivalent exemption for Delta-8 THC. That being the case, the manufacture and marketing of products containing Delta-8 THC, in any quantity or concentration level, remains prohibited by federal law.

And indeed, the federal Drug Enforcement Administration’s Controlled Substances List states that Delta-8 THC and other forms of THC are Schedule I controlled substances.”

In order to understand why this interpretation is faulty, it’s important to have in mind that in 2018, the Congress created an expansive definition of hemp.

In this definition, it was clarified that the plant Cannabis sativa L as well as any part of that plant, including seeds and all derivatives, extracts, cannabinoids, isomers, acids, salts and salts of isomers with a Delta-9 Tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3% on a dry weight basis can be considered “hemp”.

In fact, D8 THC doesn’t even contain any Delta-9 THC concentration, as they’re ultimately two separate and distinct cannabinoids.

In this sense, saying that the definition provides a “narrow exemption” overlooks that hemp produces over one hundred distinct cannabinoids aside from Delta-9 THC.

What’s even more, according to the federal Controlled Substances Act, “tetrahydrocannabinols” are controlled, but they clearly make an exception for tetrahydrocannabinols found in hemp (see 2018’s Farm Bill, Title 7, Section 1639o, definition of ‘Hemp’):

(1)Hemp.–The term `hemp’ means the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of that plant, including the seeds thereof and all derivatives, extracts, cannabinoids, isomers, acids, salts, and salts of isomers, whether growing or not, with a delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis.

Which means that this opinion is factually wrong. Delta-8 THC is only a controlled substance when derived from Marijuana, not hemp.

And due to Delta-8 THC being legal according to federal law, there’s no need to even get into analyzing Kentucky’s state law.

Ultimately, the only thing the KDA opinion letter shows -other than a faulty legal analysis- is that Kentucky is not D8 THC-friendly state.

Let’s just hope that Kentucky’s officials revise their views regarding hemp, so that the hemp industry can keep moving forward.

And lastly, don’t miss out on our Marijuana Legalization Map where you can browse the current status of laws in every state in the United States and see all our posts on each of them.

Check Out:

Interested in coming on as a guest? Email our producer at [email protected]

RELATED POST: MAP OF MARIJUANA LEGALITY BY STATE

RELATED POST: NEW JERSEY DISTRIBUTOR LICENSE

Do you need guidance?

Kentucky Ban of Delta-8 THC

Kentucky Ban of Delta-8 THC

Kentucky Delta-8 THC Hemp Ban Delta-8 THC is illegal according to Kentucky’s interpretation of federal law – at least according to the general counsel of the Department of Agriculture – who really has no authority to make conclusions of federal law. Delta-8 THC has…

Thomas Howard

Thomas Howard

Cannabis Lawyer

Thomas Howard has been in business for years and can help yours navigate towards more profitable waters.

Need A Cannabis Attorney For Your Business?

Our cannabis business attorneys are also business owners.  We can help you structure your business or help protect it from overly burdensome regulations.

The post Kentucky Ban of Delta-8 THC appeared first on Cannabis Industry Lawyer – Tom Howard.


#CBD #Hemp

Kentucky Ban of Delta-8 THC


April 26, 2021 5:38 pm

Running a Flower Business Helped This Company to Start Growing Hemp

Running a Flower Business Helped This Company to Start Growing Hemp

Founding and then running a successful flower business may not be the most obvious segue into also operating a hemp company, but such a path is the one chosen by Colorado-based Dutch Heritage Gardens (DHG) and its co-founder, Aaron Van Wingerden.

The Pennsylvania native said he almost fell into growing hemp clones after previous dissatisfaction working with some recreational cannabis facilities where he generally experienced a lack of professionalism perhaps more prevalent in the earlier days of the Colorado cannabis industry.

The company’s move into hemp, under the brand name Royale Botanicals, started in 2017, a short time before the passage of the 2018 U.S.  Farm Bill which effectively legalized the plant federally.

While Van Wingerden says he may have somewhat fallen into the industry, the profitable background and proven state of the art technology of his established flower business very much helped prepare him and the company for the new venture.

“It wasn’t as risky for me,” he said. “We were making a profit every year with the flowers and this was more of a diversification – it was a question of let’s build this up as the market requires it.”

Now, the focus is on continually improving the quality of the hemp product on offer, grown in giant outdoor greenhouses on 120 acres of land in a sparsely populated area about halfway between Denver and Colorado Springs, and marketed both all around the U.S. and internationally where countries in Europe, for example, are significant buyers.

Van Wingerden and his team swear by the superior quality of clones over product coming from seed, something the hemp industry in general may still be struggling to grasp.

“The industry needs more education as to why clones are superior to what is coming from seed,” he said.

Building Something From Nothing

Van Wingerden knows all about building a business from scratch.

He and his DHG co-founder wife, Rozalia, ventured from Ohio where they were working in the greenhouse industry, to buy the original land and building in 2006. That had previously been built and owned by Van Wingerden’s father who had then sold the business in 2002 before the subsequent owners went bankrupt two years later, leaving the buildings and site idle and empty.

From such humble beginnings, Dutch Heritage Gardens was born. Van Wingerden would literally load up plants in his van, initially pulling up to 20 King Soopers grocery stores to gauge interest, he said.

The persistence paid off eventually, the main flower buyer for the grocery chain finally calling him into a meeting which resulted in pre-bookings of $800,000 of flowers for the spring of 2007. Today, DHG sells over $6 million worth of flowers to King Soopers, its biggest customer with sales to 153 stores.

That same drive now also characterizes the newer Royale Botanicals hemp business and it is the similar large scale nature of the operations, coupled with the reality of being grown in outdoor greenhouses, that give the company an advantage in terms of cost efficiency over smaller indoor grows.

“We have a free lightbulb with the sun,” Van Wingerden said.

The scale of the business allows the company to compete with national greenhouse companies based in states like California, Ohio, and Florida, he added.

And the margins are generally higher with hemp than they are with the traditional flower business, about 20-25% for hemp compared with approximately 12-15% for the flower operations, Van Wingerden estimates, making the crop an attractive option.

Conservative Opposition to Anything Cannabis?

DHG’s operations lie in a conservative leaning county stretching from the southern suburbs of metropolitan Denver. Might there have been some opposition to the newer hemp operations simply because of possible mistrust of anything cannabis-related?

Apparently not. For example, DHG holds twice annual plant sales where people can buy directly from the company and the events are hugely popular, attracting up to 15,000 people typically each time. The reaction from attendees finding out about the company’s expansion into hemp was overwhelmingly positive, Van Wingerden said.

“People were all saying how great it was we were now going into the hemp and CBD business; they were glad to see a reputable company being involved,” he said.

Van Wingerden says he may eventually look at marijuana operations if possible locally and believes that people would overwhelmingly accept that too. Currently, such commercial grows of marijuana are not permitted locally as individual counties and municipalities have the right  to prohibit such activity even in a state where it is otherwise legal.

“There may be some demographics who would be against that, there always will be, but marijuana is here to stay and that snowball is halfway down the mountain and will be hard to stop,” he said.

Hemp Focus to Continue

For now, while the CBD market may have softened overall, Van Wingerden remains convinced there is still a huge untapped market for such hemp-related product, mainly because people just generally don’t take enough of it.

“When you take ten milligrams, it’s not doing a thing for you,” he said. “I think we should be looking at at least a 50 mg dose and as high as 300.”

He himself takes larger doses than most both to alleviate his own back pain and to “sleep like a baby,” as he puts it.

While the industry needs more education as to the benefits of hemp clones over seed, consumers still have a lot to learn about how hemp and CBD can benefit them too. Royale Botanicals intends to help them while maintaining and improving upon the production of high quality material.


#CBD #Hemp
https://cannatechtoday.com/dutch-heritage-gardens/
April 26, 2021 11:00 am

North Carolina Legislators Propose Bill to Legalize Marijuana

North Carolina Legislators Propose Bill to Legalize Marijuana

For cannabis enthusiasts in North Carolina, this was a historic 4/20 they’ll never forget. 

On April 20th, the widely celebrated holiday honoring the marijuana plant, North Carolina lawmakers introduced a bill to legalize cannabis. 

The bill, HB 617, was introduced by Representatives John Autry, Allison Dahle, Pricey Harrison, and Zack Hawkins. 

HB 617 was created to establish registration and licensure requirements, as well as procedures governing the operation of cannabis establishments.

The bill legalizes the possession and use of cannabis by adults age 21 and up.

The legislation would also legalize the possession of up to two ounces of cannabis and up to six cannabis plants. 

As more states are putting plans in action to join the 27 states which have already decriminalized cannabis, the industry is poised to make an even bigger profit.

It’s important to recognize that, according to the Last Prisoner Project, there are still 40,000 people sitting in jail due to nonviolent cannabis convictions while 2018 saw 10.4 billion in legal marijuana sales in the U.S. alone. 

North Carolina legislators recognize that there has to be an emphasis on social equity to reverse the damage created from the war on drugs.

The HB 617 bill orders the creation of an Office of Social Equity within the department of Public Safety, as well as expungement of convictions for offenses involving marijuana or hashish.

The bill also provides protections against discrimination for those who have been employed at a cannabis establishment and protections for tenants with prior cannabis-related convictions. 

This legislation comes just a few months after North Carolina residents showed enthusiastic approval for legal cannabis.

A February 2021 poll conducted by Elon University found 73% of North Carolina voters supported the legalization of marijuana for medical purposes and 54% supported the legalization of marijuana for recreational use.

The poll indicated North Carolina residents recognize the medical benefits of cannabis, with only 22% saying it is “morally wrong” to smoke marijuana. 

“In 2021, it is morally, practically, and politically indefensible to support the ongoing prohibition and criminalization of marijuana,” said NORML Political Director Justin Strekal. “When it comes to legalization, now is the time for leaders of all political stripes to lead, follow, or get out of the way.”


#CBD #Hemp
https://cannatechtoday.com/north-carolina-legislators-propose-bill-to-legalize-marijuana/
April 23, 2021 7:52 pm

How to open a dispensary in Massachusetts

How to open a dispensary in Massachusetts

How to open a dispensary in Massachusetts

How to Open a Dispensary in Massachusetts

Open a dispensary in Massachusetts

If you’ve been considering opening a dispensary in Massachusetts, our step-by-step guide walks you through the dispensary application process, fees, as well as other general specifications.

If you are over 21 and have never been convicted of a crime involving banned drugs, you might be able to start a cannabis-related company in Massachusetts.

Opening a Cannabis Dispensary in Massachusetts

If you’d like to run a dispensary in Massachusetts, you’ll need to know the rules and regulations of your state, county, and city in order to stay in compliance. Learn about the medical and recreational aspects of the rule.

With the revenue generated by cannabis dispensaries in the billions of dollars and rising, these developments present a very lucrative opportunity. However, opening and running a dispensary is a challenging business venture:

  • Opening a dispensary requires a lot of considerations, compliance with numerous regulations and a significant amount of capital.
  • Costs to open your doors could run from $500,000 upwards of millions depending on real estate costsand the size of the operation.
  • Many cannabis dispensaries are selling millions of dollars of product a month
  • Competition for new dispensaries tends to be fierce.

The Cannabis Control Commission (CCC) is responsible for promulgating regulations relating to marijuana, processing business applications and issuing licenses, and creating policies and procedures which “promote and encourage full participation in the regulated marijuana industry by people from communities that have previously been disproportionately harmed by marijuana prohibition and enforcement and to positively impact those communities.

RELATED POST: HOW TO OPEN A DISPENSARY IN OHIO

RELATED POST: HOW TO OPEN A DISPENSARY IN NEW MEXICO

Do you need guidance?

Obtain a Massachusetts Marijuana Retailer License

You can check out the details on how to obtain a Massachusetts marijuana retailer license here. Obtaining a license can be incredibly difficult and costly. Further, there usually are strict requirements for prospective dispensary owners.

The first step to applying for a Massachusetts Marijuana Retailer License is to submit the license application fee and all three (3) sections of the application:

  • Application of Intent,
  • Background Check, and
  • Management and Operations Profile.

Each section requires applicants to provide accurate information about the business, individuals and entities associated with the business and to demonstrate understanding of, and plans to comply with, the Commission’s regulations that are specific to the applicant’s license type, location, and scale. The adult- and medical-use license applications have essentially the same requirements with differences highlighted in the following sections.

Also, your team should prepare various business plans, which should include:

  • Financial Plan
  • Manufacturing Plan
  • Inventory Control Plan
  • Security Plan
  • Recordkeeping Plan
  • Community Benefits Plan

A revenue forecast is conducted by estimating how much product you think you will sell production costs, retail price and complementary costs (payroll, rent, transport, etc.). You may also include a break-even analysis, with an estimated timeline until profitability.

  • Massachusetts-specific Requirements – You may include details of covering your security systems, secure product transport, product tracking, waste plans and other state requirements. Note that these may be included in your application.
  • Investor Proposal – Involves how you will value your shares if you present your plan to investors. Consult with a CPA to ensure you are compliant with state and federal regulations

What are the costs of opening a dispensary in Massachusetts?

In order to obtain a Massachusetts Cannabis Retail License, there’s no minimum amount of capital resources that must be demonstrated. In this sense. In this sense we’d recommend any ME applicant to aim for $250,000 – $1,000,000 depending on the size and scope of their operation.

Further, applicants are required to set aside, either through a bond or an escrow account, an amount of money sufficient to cover the dismantling and winding down of the Marijuana Establishment. The amount set aside must be enough to cover the cost of satisfying any outstanding state or municipal sales tax obligations, costs incurred securing the licensee’s facility, and cost incurred for destroying the marijuana and marijuana products in its inventory. 

Conclusion

With the right motivation and access to necessary resources, our office can help you successfully start a profitable cannabis dispensary in Massachusetts. Although it is important to note that this process takes time even when you have the resources.

Given the licensure steps, finding a suitable location and developing your storefront to meet the state requirements, it may take well over a year from application to selling.

Remember: the cannabis industry is heavily regulated and getting help from industry, and business experts is recommendable.

And lastly, don’t miss out on our Marijuana Legalization Map where you can browse the current status of laws in every state in the United States and see all our posts on each of them.

Check Out:

Interested in coming on as a guest? Email our producer at [email protected]

Do you need guidance?

Kentucky Ban of Delta-8 THC

Kentucky Ban of Delta-8 THC

Kentucky Delta-8 THC Hemp Ban Delta-8 THC is illegal according to Kentucky’s interpretation of federal law – at least according to the general counsel of the Department of Agriculture – who really has no authority to make conclusions of federal law. Delta-8 THC has…

Thomas Howard

Thomas Howard

Cannabis Lawyer

Thomas Howard has been in business for years and can help yours navigate towards more profitable waters.

How to open a dispensary in New Jersey

How to open a dispensary in New Jersey

How to get a dispensary license in New Jersey? That’s the question you should ask yourself if you’re thinking about opening a dispensary in New Jersey. In order to obtain a dispensary license, you’d need to comply with requirements established by the new law on the…

Need A Cannabis Attorney For Your Business?

Our cannabis business attorneys are also business owners.  We can help you structure your business or help protect it from overly burdensome regulations.

The post How to open a dispensary in Massachusetts appeared first on Cannabis Industry Lawyer – Tom Howard.


#CBD #Hemp

How to open a dispensary in Massachusetts


April 23, 2021 1:32 am

Fuchs North America: Natural Appeal

Fuchs North America: Natural Appeal
Fuchs North America introduces the Earthy Eats Collection, a limited edition line of seasonings that deliver munchies for every occasion. These new seasonings—derived from and inspired by the earthy flavors of hemp—will delight consumers’ taste buds. This collection presents craveable seasoning blends ideal for beverages, baked goods, snacks, and ice cream. These items are also the starting point for food manufacturers to develop their own rich signature product offerings, with Fuchs’ culinary specialists at their side.

#CBD #Hemp
https://www.preparedfoods.com/articles/125460-fuchs-north-america-natural-appeal
April 22, 2021 10:00 pm

Charlotte’s Web Poised for Canadian Expansion

Charlotte’s Web Poised for Canadian Expansion

Charlotte’s Web Holdings, the company that just about launched the entire CBD industry, announced this week that they have just been approved for registration on Health Canada’s list of approved cultivars (LOAC) for 2021. Three of their proprietary hemp cultivars have made the cut, gaining the company access to the Canadian market.

Jared Stanley, co-founder and chief cultivation officer at Charlotte’s Web, says they plan to lead the market in Canadian hemp-derived CBD products. “The majority of approved cultivars on the LOAC to date have been for industrial hemp grown to produce food, fiber, and animal feed,” says Stanley. “Now our approved cultivars are paving the way for full-spectrum hemp CBD demand in Canada and most importantly, will provide access to Charlotte’s Web products in Canada.”

Largely due to the difference in regulatory approaches between Canada and the U.S., the CBD product market in Canada is somewhat small. Health Canada currently regulates CBD products the same as products containing more than 0.3% THC. In the U.S., a checkerboard of state laws, the 2018 Farm Bill and the subsequent state hemp programs led to massive growth for the CBD product marketplace.

Charlotte’s Web is one of the leading hemp-derived CBD companies operating in the United States. With the soon-to-be expansion into Canada, the company hopes to develop a global footprint, says Deanie Elsner, president and CEO of Charlotte’s Web. “Today, Charlotte’s Web is the leading hemp wellness company in the U.S. with the most recognized and trusted hemp CBD extract,” says Elsner. “We aspire to be the world’s leading botanicals wellness company, entering countries with an asset light model where federal laws permit hemp extracts for health and wellness. Israel and Canada are included in the first steps of our international expansion.”

The post Charlotte’s Web Poised for Canadian Expansion appeared first on Cannabis Industry Journal.


#CBD #Hemp

Charlotte’s Web Poised for Canadian Expansion


April 22, 2021 7:52 pm

Canopy Growth Signs U.S. Distribution Deal

Canopy Growth Signs U.S. Distribution Deal

Canopy Growth Corporation, the Canadian cannabis powerhouse moving its way throughout international markets, has signaled another move into the United States to push their new CBD beverage line. The company inked a deal with Southern Glazer’s Wine & Spirits, a large U.S. alcohol distributor.

Canopy_Growth_Corporation_logoThis follows the launch of their first CBD-infused beverage line sold in the United States, Quatreau. In the initial phase of the agreement, Southern Glazer’s will distribute the beverage line in seven states, with plans to expand that footprint considerably in the coming months.

Being a national distributor with a strong presence throughout the country, Southern Glazer’s will be moving Canopy’s beverage line in conventional retail stores. The press release seems to credit Canopy’s partnership with Constellation Brands as the catalyst for the new distribution deal. “The agreement also showcases the benefits of the company’s strategic relationship with Constellation Brands, the global beverage leader,” reads the release.

Back in 2018, Constellation Brands made a $4 billion bet on Canopy, but immediate profitability did not come to fruition. This new deal with Southern Glazer’s, as well as the launch of the Quatreau beverage line, seems to prove Constellation’s bet is beginning to pay off, or at least showing signs of a long term play for market share.

The post Canopy Growth Signs U.S. Distribution Deal appeared first on Cannabis Industry Journal.


#CBD #Hemp

Canopy Growth Signs U.S. Distribution Deal


April 22, 2021 3:35 pm

Clean Green Farming is Good for Cannabis

Clean Green Farming is Good for Cannabis

At Raw Garden, we have a ‘Farming First’ philosophy because we understand that the process of farming is the process of managing the plant’s life and the management of the land those plants grow on – this is when the plantgets its chance to thrive but requires that it is properly nurtured in order to provide resources such as high-quality terpenes and cannabinoids.

Our cannabis plants are sun-grown in Santa Barbara county soil just like other California crops. From the seed to the shelf, we are vertically integrated and maintain quality control at every step in the process. We grow our own seeds, farm and harvest our own plants, and process our own products while employing sustainable and regenerative farming practices – only organic and natural fertilizers, soil amendments and pest control methods are used on thefarm.

As farmers we have a responsibility to care for the land and the soil to ensure it is fertile and healthy well into the future. We take care of the soil and it takes care of our plants. The result is premium quality products that our customers love and trust. Our success and commitment to quality is proof that the economics of clean, sustainable operations are achievable. We’re farmers and scientists on a mission to make clean, high quality cannabis that is affordable and accessible.

A few of the sustainable agriculture practices we employ at Raw Garden include:

The Clean Green Certified logo

Clean Green Certification – Since our inception, we have been certified and licensed members of Clean Green, the #1 globally-recognized organic and sustainable cannabis certification program. The program was created in 2004 as a way to standardize legal cannabis products and the result was a program to help farms and brands obtain organic-like certification based on the USDA National Organic program. Clean Green-certified growers and processors regularly win awards for their high-quality products, including our award-winning extracts.

Water Conservation – Our farm team waters at the right time of day to reduce evaporative water loss; we also use drip irrigation and mulch to reduce water waste and runoff. Last year, we used about 8,000 gallons of water per acre on average, which is significantly less than standard outdoor grown crops.

Natural Fertilizer and Pest Control – We apply only organic fertilizers and foliar feeds and we spray only organic pathogen-free inoculants to keep our plants healthy and disease-free, which consistently results in high yields. To naturally deter pests, we recruit beneficial predatory insects like ladybugs and parasitic wasps, in addition to botanical oils and diatomaceous earth.

Precision Agriculture (PA) and Site-Specific Crop Management (SSCM) – We utilize technology to manage crops and increase farm efficiency, such as machine learning for fertilizer optimization and digital sensors in the field to monitor crops.

Author Khalid Al-Naser next at Raw Garden’s farm.
Image by Brian Walker

Soil Health and Terroir – Like grapes for wine, cannabis plants grown in the soil have terroir that affects the flower’s qualities, characteristics, terpene profile, aroma and taste, based on temperature, climate, soil composition and topography, as well as other environmental influences. Micro-climates matter – the same strain of cannabis grown along the coast likely has a different taste and potency than one grown inland. We grow in Santa Barbara wine country for the combination of fertile soil, hot sun, and cool nights which yield an incredibly diverse, potent and flavorful crop of cannabis flowers. Between growing seasons, we employ regenerative agriculture by planting cover crops including oat, beans, peas and buckwheat to add nitrogen and organic matter naturally back in the soil. This method of cover crops also helps reduce pests and soil-borne diseases in preparation for the next growing season. We know that an ideal environment in combination with healthy soil and good land management results in healthier, more vigorous plants, which translates to higher-quality products.

As farmers, it is our responsibility to care of the land with good management decisions today so that we grow the best quality products while better preserving the land for the future. It takes careful planning, knowledge of the land, a commitment to sustainable practices and a desire to put farming first.

The post Clean Green Farming is Good for Cannabis appeared first on Cannabis Industry Journal.


#CBD #Hemp

Clean Green Farming is Good for Cannabis


April 21, 2021 11:08 pm

How to open a dispensary in Ohio

How to open a dispensary in Ohio

How to Open a Dispensary in Ohio

How to Open a Dispensary in Ohio

How to open a dispensary in Ohio

Are you interested in learning how to open a cannabis dispensary in Ohio? This page will keep you up to date on the latest news and developments in the cannabis industry in Ohio.

On June 9th, 2016, Ohio’s Governor signed HB 523 into law, granting permission to establish a medical marijuana program. It gave Ohio the green light to create a new medical marijuana policy. The Phase I Cultivator Application was published in April of 2017.

If you’ve ever thought about opening a medical marijuana dispensary in Ohio, now is a perfect time to get started. Here are the most important things to remember about opening a dispensary in Ohio.

Opening a Medical Marijuana Dispensary in Ohio

The State Board of Pharmacy (BOP) is responsible for overseeing medical marijuana retail dispensaries, the registration of medical marijuana patients and caregivers, the approval of new forms of medical marijuana and coordinating the Medical Marijuana Advisory Committee.

With the revenue generated by cannabis dispensaries in the billions of dollars and rising, these developments present a very lucrative opportunity. However, opening and running a dispensary is a challenging business venture:

  • Opening a dispensary requires a lot of considerations, compliance with numerous regulations and a significant amount of capital. 
  • Costs to open your doors could run from $500,000 upwards of millions depending on real estate costsand the size of the operation.
  • Many cannabis dispensaries are selling millions of dollars of product a month
  • Competition for new dispensaries tends to be fierce.

It’s important to know that the Ohio Board of Pharmacy, which oversees Ohio’s Medical Marijuana Dispensaries, is getting ready to expand the number of dispensaries in Ohio from 57 to 130.

Ohio Board of Pharmacy Executive Director Steven Schierholt recently told the Board he’s recommending they begin a Request for Application process that would add 73 new Medical Marijuana dispensaries to the existing 57 that are approved in Ohio. That would cap the state’s dispensaries at 130.

RELATED POST: HOW TO OPEN A DISPENSARY IN NEW JERSEY

RELATED POST: HOW TO OPEN A DISPENSARY IN NEW YORK

Do you need guidance?

Requirements for a medical marijuana dispensary license in Ohio

In order to obtain a Medical Marijuana license you should take into account the following

  • According to current legislation, no more than 57 dispensary licenses shall be awarded statewide(although this is likely to change in the near future);
  • A dispensary may not be any less than 500 feet from a school, church, public library, public playground or public park as well as remaining ensuring;
  • The location has to meet local zoning laws within their respective city/county;
  • The applicant must provide proof that the applicant has adequate liquid assets to cover all expenses and costs of the first year of less than $250,000.

Financial requirements for an Ohio dispensary

  • Application fee: $5,000
  • License fee: $80,000
  • Annual renewal: $80,000
  • Dispensary certificate of operation fee $70,000
  • Biennial renewal for a dispensary license fee $70,000
  • Biennial renewal for a dispensary associated key employee card fee $500
  • Biennial renewal for a dispensary key employee card fee $250
  • Biennial renewal for a dispensary support employee card fee $100
  • Reissued dispensary certificate of operation or employee identification card fee $50
  • Change in ownership fee $5,000
  • Relocation fee $5,000
  • Major modification or renovation fee $5,000

Timeframe

Nowadays, there’s no application window open, however, it’s only a matter of time until the window gets open again and you can start applying as recently, Ohio’s Board of Pharmacy Executive Director Steven Schierholt told the board he’s recommending they begin a Request for Application process that would add 73 new Medical Marijuana Dispensaries to the existing 57 that are approved in the state.

Conclusion

With the right motivation and access to necessary resources, our office can help you successfully start a profitable cannabis dispensary in Ohio. Although it is important to note that this process takes time even when you have the resources.

Given the licensure steps, finding a suitable location and developing your storefront to meet the state requirements, it may take well over a year from application to selling.

Remember: the cannabis industry is heavily regulated and getting help from industry, and business experts is recommendable.

And lastly, don’t miss out on our Marijuana Legalization Map where you can browse the current status of laws in every state in the United States and see all our posts on each of them.

Check Out:

Interested in coming on as a guest? Email our producer at [email protected]

Do you need guidance?

Kentucky Ban of Delta-8 THC

Kentucky Ban of Delta-8 THC

Kentucky Delta-8 THC Hemp Ban Delta-8 THC is illegal according to Kentucky’s interpretation of federal law – at least according to the general counsel of the Department of Agriculture – who really has no authority to make conclusions of federal law. Delta-8 THC has…

Thomas Howard

Thomas Howard

Cannabis Lawyer

Thomas Howard has been in business for years and can help yours navigate towards more profitable waters.

Need A Cannabis Attorney For Your Business?

Our cannabis business attorneys are also business owners.  We can help you structure your business or help protect it from overly burdensome regulations.

The post How to open a dispensary in Ohio appeared first on Cannabis Industry Lawyer – Tom Howard.


#CBD #Hemp

How to open a dispensary in Ohio


April 21, 2021 10:29 pm

Pamos Cannabis-Infused Spirits Launch in California

Pamos Cannabis-Infused Spirits Launch in California

Pamos Beverage Company has launched a line of premium, non-alcoholic cannabis spirits infused with THC, CBD and plant terpenes.


#CBD #Hemp
https://www.preparedfoods.com/articles/125443-pamos-cannabis-infused-spirits-launch-in-california
April 20, 2021 2:40 pm

Creators of TasteBudz Gummies Launch Water-Soluble THC Powder

Creators of TasteBudz Gummies Launch Water-Soluble THC Powder

The creators of Colorado cannabis-infused gummy brand TasteBudz have launched ebb, a fast-acting, THC-infused dissolvable powder using nano-encapsulating technology.


#CBD #Hemp
https://www.preparedfoods.com/articles/125442-creators-of-tastebudz-gummies-launch-water-soluble-thc-powder
April 20, 2021 2:17 pm

How to open a cannabis dispensary in New Mexico

How to open a cannabis dispensary in New Mexico

How to Open a Cannabis Dispensary in New Mexico

How to Open a Cannabis Dispensary in New Mexico

Open a cannabis dispensary in New Mexico

The New Mexico Legislature recently voted to legalize recreational cannabis through the House Bill 2 that was recently passed by two House committees. 

The bill, sponsored by Reps. Javier Martinez, Andrea Romero, and Deborah A. Armstrong passed the House Health and Human Services Committee on Feb. 15 and passed the House of Taxation and Revenue Committee on Feb 24. Now, on March 31, it passed the Senate on a 22-15 vote. 

It then returned to the House, which had approved it 38–32 earlier in the day, for consideration of Senate changes. That vote passed by a voice vote.

Legal retail sales are scheduled to begin by April 1, 2022

Opening a Cannabis Dispensary in New Mexico

Although there have been some delays in signing the bill, and the road to recreational sales in early 2021 is anything but clear, recreational sales are expected to take up to six months to reach the market.

With the revenue generated by cannabis dispensaries in the billions of dollars and rising, these developments present a very lucrative opportunity. However, opening and running a dispensary is a challenging business venture:

  • Opening a dispensary requires a lot of considerations, compliance with numerous regulations and a significant amount of capital.
  • Costs to open your doors could run from $500,000 upwards of millions depending on real estate costsand the size of the operation.
  • Many cannabis dispensaries are selling millions of dollars of product a month
  • Competition for new dispensaries tends to be fierce.

It’s important to mention that the first dispensaries that will sell recreational cannabis will be existing medical marijuana dispensaries, and although the application window isn’t open just yet, it is generally a good idea to be prepared ahead of time for the application process.

Timeframe for the licensing process

The Cannabis Control Division is going to start accepting and processing New Mexico Cannabis license applications in accordance with the following schedule:

  • September 1, 2021: Cannabis producers; cannabis producers microbusinesses and any other person properly licensed and in good standing as a licensed cannabis producer pursuant to the Lynn and Erin Compassionate Use Act.
  • January, 2022: All other licenses.

The Cannabis Control Division (CCC) is scheduled to develop a plan to encourage racial, ethnic, gender and geographic diversity among licensees by no later than January 1, 2022. 

RELATED POST: HOW TO OPEN A CANNABIS MICROBUSINESS IN NEW JERSEY

RELATED POST: HOW TO OPEN A CANNABIS BUSINESS LICENSE IN NEW JERSEY

Do you need guidance?

Obtain a New Mexico Cannabis License

You can check out the details on how to obtain a New Mexico cannabis license here. Obtaining a cannabis license can be incredibly difficult and costly. Further, there usually are strict requirements for prospective dispensary owners.

Apart from direct cannabis knowledge, your team must be knowledgeable in a wide range of topics. This is because there are multiple topics considered essential to running a cannabis company, and any information gaps will jeopardize long-term success.

Also, your team should prepare various business plans, which should include:

  • Financial Plan
  • Manufacturing Plan
  • Inventory Control Plan
  • Security Plan
  • Recordkeeping Plan
  • Community Benefits Plan

A revenue forecast is conducted by estimating how much product you think you will sell production costs, retail price and complementary costs (payroll, rent, transport, etc.). You may also include a break-even analysis, with an estimated timeline until profitability.

  • New Mexico-specific Requirements – You may include details of covering your security systems, secure product transport, product tracking, waste plans and other state requirements. Note that these may be included in your application.
  • Investor Proposal – Involves how you will value your shares if you present your plan to investors. Consult with a CPA to ensure you are compliant with state and federal regulations

Conclusion

With the right motivation and access to necessary resources, our office can help you successfully start a profitable cannabis dispensary in New Mexico. Although it is important to note that this process takes time even when you have the resources.

Given the licensure steps, finding a suitable location and developing your storefront to meet the state requirements, it may take well over a year from application to selling.

Remember: the cannabis industry is heavily regulated and getting help from industry, and business experts is recommendable.

And lastly, don’t miss out on our Marijuana Legalization Map where you can browse the current status of laws in every state in the United States and see all our posts on each of them.

Check Out:

Interested in coming on as a guest? Email our producer at [email protected]

Do you need guidance?

Kentucky Ban of Delta-8 THC

Kentucky Ban of Delta-8 THC

Kentucky Delta-8 THC Hemp Ban Delta-8 THC is illegal according to Kentucky’s interpretation of federal law – at least according to the general counsel of the Department of Agriculture – who really has no authority to make conclusions of federal law. Delta-8 THC has…

Thomas Howard

Thomas Howard

Cannabis Lawyer

Thomas Howard has been in business for years and can help yours navigate towards more profitable waters.

How to open a dispensary in New Jersey

How to open a dispensary in New Jersey

How to get a dispensary license in New Jersey? That’s the question you should ask yourself if you’re thinking about opening a dispensary in New Jersey. In order to obtain a dispensary license, you’d need to comply with requirements established by the new law on the…

Need A Cannabis Attorney For Your Business?

Our cannabis business attorneys are also business owners.  We can help you structure your business or help protect it from overly burdensome regulations.

The post How to open a cannabis dispensary in New Mexico appeared first on Cannabis Industry Lawyer – Tom Howard.


#CBD #Hemp

How to open a cannabis dispensary in New Mexico


April 16, 2021 10:11 pm

How to open a dispensary in New Jersey

How to open a dispensary in New Jersey

How to Open a Cannabis Dispensary in New Jersey

Want to Get a Dispensary License in New Jersey in 2021?

How to Open a Dispensary in New Jersey

How to get a dispensary license in New JerseyHow to get a dispensary license in New Jersey? That’s the question you should ask yourself if you’re thinking about opening a dispensary in New Jersey. In order to obtain a dispensary license, you’d need to comply with requirements established by the new law on the matter and be awarded a license – a rigorous process.

Medical marijuana businesses became legal in New Jersey in 2010 –although heavily regulated- just to give some perspective on this: even though the state has a population of 8.8 million, there are only 13 medical cannabis dispensaries

Since November 2020, recreational marijuana businesses have been legalized, thanks to a ballot initiative. According to this initiative, The Cannabis Regulatory Commission (CRC) will oversee the state’s marijuana program and the issuance of associated licenses, and among them, the dispensary licenses. However, the county and city where the business will be located may also determine whether you can start a business within their borders or not.

With some sources stating that the market size of legal marijuana is expected to reach $23 billion by 2025, the one thing that’s certain about this state is that there’s good money to be made in legal Cannabis in New Jersey –once you decide you’re willing to overcome all the bureaucracy and some stiff competition.  

Medical marijuana dispensary licenses in New Jersey

Unfortunately, 22 August 2019 was the last date to apply for a medical marijuana dispensary license in New Jersey and since then, there hasn’t been another period to apply for it. However, this doesn’t mean that it won’t open anytime soon. What’s even more: with the approval of adult-use marijuana, there’ll be an opening for businesses to get a dispensary license soon. 

So, now is the time when you need to know what to do, what to expect, and how much everything is going to cost, so you can get ahead of your competition. 

RELATED POST: HOW TO OPEN A CANNABIS MICROBUSINESS IN NEW JERSEY

RELATED POST: HOW TO OPEN A CANNABIS BUSINESS LICENSE IN NEW JERSEY

Want to Get a Dispensary License in New Jersey in 2021?

Opening a Cannabis Dispensary New Jersey

Although there have been some delays in signing the bill, and the road to recreational sales in early 2021 is anything but clear, recreational sales are expected to take up to six months to reach the market.

With the revenue generated by cannabis dispensaries in the billions of dollars and rising, these developments present a very lucrative opportunity. However, opening and running a dispensary is a challenging business venture:

  • Opening a dispensary requires a lot of considerations, compliance with numerous regulations and a significant amount of capital.
  • Costs to open your doors could run from $500,000 upwards of millions depending on real estate costs and the size of the operation.
  • Many cannabis dispensaries are selling millions of dollars of product a month
  • Competition for new dispensaries tends to be fierce.

It’s important to mention that the first dispensaries that will sell recreational cannabis will be existing medical marijuana dispensaries, and although the application window isn’t open just yet, it is generally a good idea to be prepared ahead of time for the application process.

Obtain a New Jersey Dispensary License

You can check out the details on how to obtain a cannabis dispensary license here. Obtaining a cannabis license can be incredibly difficult and costly. Further, there usually are strict requirements for prospective dispensary owners.

There is information pending regarding the licensing process. However, according to the current recreational cannabis bill:

“Each license application shall be scored and reviewed based upon a point scale with the commission determining the amount of points, the point categories, and the system of point distribution by regulation. The commission shall assign points and rank [all] applicants [, from the most to the least points,] according to the point system.”

This “point system” approach is similar to what we’ve seen in other states that have recently legalized adult-use cannabis. Your application will be scored using a point system that considers your and your team’s experience, skills, and qualifications on a wide range of topics. Here’s a sample of some of the topics you may be assessed on:

  • Environmental impact plan
  • Safety and security procedures
  • Cybersecurity plan
  • Emergency management plan
  • Diversion prevention
  • Sanitation practices plan
  • Procedures reporting adverse events
  • Proof of financial competence to carry out plans

As you can see, apart from direct cannabis knowledge, you must be knowledgeable in a wide range of topics. This is because each of the above topics is essential to running a cannabis company, and any information gaps will jeopardize long-term success.

Also, your team should prepare a business plan, which should include:

  • Financing plan
  • Quality control and quality assurance plan
  • Dispensary/operations plan
  • Labor compliance plan
  • Workforce and job creation plan
  • Security plan
  • Environmental impact plan
  • Anything else you think would help you stand out and attract investors

A revenue forecast is conducted by estimating how much product you think you will sell production costs, retail price and complementary costs (payroll, rent, transport, etc.). You may also include a break-even analysis, with an estimated timeline until profitability.

  • New Jersey-specific Requirements – You may include details of covering your security systems, secure product transport, product tracking, waste plans and other state requirements. Note that these may be included in your application.
  • Investor Proposal – Involves how you will value your shares if you present your plan to investors. Consult with a CPA to ensure you are compliant with state and federal regulations

Conclusion

With the right motivation and access to necessary resources, our office can help you successfully start a profitable cannabis dispensary in New Jersey. Although it is important to note that this process takes time even when you have the resources.

Given the licensure steps, finding a suitable location and developing your storefront to meet the state requirements, it may take well over a year from application to selling.

Remember: the cannabis industry is heavily regulated and getting help from industry, and business experts is recommendable.

And lastly, don’t miss out on our Marijuana Legalization Map where you can browse the current status of laws in every state in the United States and see all our posts on each of them.

Check Out:

Interested in coming on as a guest? Email our producer at [email protected]

Want to Get a Dispensary License in New Jersey in 2021?

Kentucky Ban of Delta-8 THC

Kentucky Ban of Delta-8 THC

Kentucky Delta-8 THC Hemp Ban Delta-8 THC is illegal according to Kentucky’s interpretation of federal law – at least according to the general counsel of the Department of Agriculture – who really has no authority to make conclusions of federal law. Delta-8 THC has…

Thomas Howard

Thomas Howard

Cannabis Lawyer

Thomas Howard has been in business for years and can help yours navigate towards more profitable waters.

How to open a dispensary in New Jersey

How to open a dispensary in New Jersey

How to get a dispensary license in New Jersey? That’s the question you should ask yourself if you’re thinking about opening a dispensary in New Jersey. In order to obtain a dispensary license, you’d need to comply with requirements established by the new law on the…

Need A Cannabis Attorney For Your Business?

Our cannabis business attorneys are also business owners.  We can help you structure your business or help protect it from overly burdensome regulations.

The post How to open a dispensary in New Jersey appeared first on Cannabis Industry Lawyer – Tom Howard.


#CBD #Hemp

How to open a dispensary in New Jersey


April 16, 2021 7:11 pm

How to open a dispensary in New York

How to open a dispensary in New York

How to open a dispensary in New York

How to open a dispensary in New York

How to open a dispensary in New York

Do you want to open a dispensary in New York but don’t know where to start? This page will keep you informed of the latest news and updates about starting a cannabis company in New York.

New York became the 15th state to legalize recreational cannabis on March 31st. This means that one of the most promising cannabis markets has opened up.

Opening a Cannabis Dispensary in New York

New York will issue retail licenses to applicants, although we don’t know the timeframe in which the application process is going to start, it is expected that retail sales would start in 2022.

With the revenue generated by cannabis dispensaries in the billions of dollars and rising, these developments present a very lucrative opportunity. However, opening and running a dispensary is a challenging business venture:

  • Opening a dispensary requires a lot of considerations, compliance with numerous regulations and a significant amount of capital. 
  • Costs to open your doors could run from $500,000 upwards of millions depending on real estate costs and the size of the operation.
  • Many cannabis dispensaries are selling millions of dollars of product a month
  • Competition for new dispensaries tends to be fierce.

Prepare a Business Plan

You will need a business plan if you seek to open a dispensary in New York. There are several aspects that your business plan should cover. These are explained in detail below:

  • Product/Service Description – This entails how you plan to run the dispensary and the unique aspects about it. Try to be as specific as possible. Include details of the strains of flower you will dispense and where you will source them.
  • Market Research – This section includes the methods you used to identify your target customers and how this data will affect your marketing, operations and pricing. Always use concrete numbers (ideally verified by a third party) rather than estimates.
  • Competitors – Includes details on other businesses that you will compete with, either directly or indirectly. What are their strengths and weakness, and how do you plan to differentiate your business.
  • Leadership Team – This section includes a summary of your qualifications and those of your management team. You may include business development experience in other sectors, leadership skills or customer service.
  • Financials – This section can be quite daunting. It involves formulating a clear and concise budget. You should include a long-term (say 5 years) financial forecast that includes operational expenses, net profit and projected annual revenue.

A revenue forecast is conducted by estimating how much product you think you will sell production costs, retail price and complementary costs (payroll, rent, transport, etc.). You may also include a break-even analysis, with an estimated timeline until profitability.

  • New York-specific Requirements – You may include details of covering your security systems, secure product transport, product tracking, waste plans and other state requirements.
  • Investor Proposal – Involves how you will value your shares if you present your plan to investors. Consult with a CPA to ensure you are compliant with state and federal regulations

RELATED POST: MAINE MARIJUANA LICENSE: HOW TO APPLY

RELATED POST: CANNABIS SPAC

Do you need guidance?

Obtain a Cannabis Dispensary License

You can check out the details on how to obtain a cannabis dispensary license here. Obtaining a cannabis license can be incredibly difficult and costly. Further, there usually are strict requirements for prospective dispensary owners.

The prospect of booming business

With the new law set to take effect soon it is only a matter of time before the cannabis industry develops into a multi-billion industry. Residents can take advantage of the various licenses set to be issued out for growers and dispensary owners. Going by the stipulations in the new bill it is a very real prospect that New Yorkcould soon become a cannabis haven and there is no telling what new opportunities may crop up in the process.

Business plans you will need to open a dispensary in New York

There are a lot of things to consider as you prepare to make your application as a cannabis dispensary. If you are looking to apply for the license then you will probably need the following business plans;

  • Financial plan
  • Marketing plan
  • Security plan
  • Suitability of proposed facility
  • Staffing plan
  • Plan with which to educate patients
  • Inventory control

Conclusion

With the right motivation and access to necessary resources, our office can help you successfully start a profitable cannabis dispensary in New York. Although it is important to note that this process takes time even when you have the resources.

Given the licensure steps, finding a suitable location and developing your storefront to meet the state requirements, it may take well over a year from application to selling.

Remember: the cannabis industry is heavily regulated and getting help from industry, and business experts is recommendable.

And lastly, don’t miss out on our Marijuana Legalization Map where you can browse the current status of laws in every state in the United States and see all our posts on each of them.

RELATED POST: HOW TO OPEN A MARIJUANA DISPENSARY IN MAINE

RELATED POST: NEW JERSEY DISTRIBUTOR LICENSE

Do you need guidance?

Kentucky Ban of Delta-8 THC

Kentucky Ban of Delta-8 THC

Kentucky Delta-8 THC Hemp Ban Delta-8 THC is illegal according to Kentucky’s interpretation of federal law – at least according to the general counsel of the Department of Agriculture – who really has no authority to make conclusions of federal law. Delta-8 THC has…

Thomas Howard

Thomas Howard

Cannabis Lawyer

Thomas Howard has been in business for years and can help yours navigate towards more profitable waters.

Need A Cannabis Attorney For Your Business?

Our cannabis business attorneys are also business owners.  We can help you structure your business or help protect it from overly burdensome regulations.

The post How to open a dispensary in New York appeared first on Cannabis Industry Lawyer – Tom Howard.


#CBD #Hemp

How to open a dispensary in New York


April 15, 2021 10:52 pm

How to open a marijuana dispensary in Maine

How to open a marijuana dispensary in Maine

How to open a marijuana dispensary in Maine

How to open a dispensary in Maine

How to open a marijuana dispensary in Maine

Are you wondering how to open a marijuana dispensary in Maine? This page will keep you up to date with the latest news and information relevant to opening a marijuana store in Maine.

Although adult-use marijuana was legalized in 2016, Maine did not establish regulations for commercial sales until 2019, when Gov. Janet Mills signed LD 719 to approve a ruleset.

Maine’s Office of Marijuana Policy (OMP) is in charge of the licensing process of the adult-use marijuana establishments. The first licenses were issued in September, 2020, and sales began in October of the same year.

A marijuana store is an establishment licensed to purchase adult use marijuana, immature marijuana plants and seedlings from a cultivation facility, to purchase adult use marijuana and adult use marijuana products from a products manufacturing facility and to sell adult use marijuana, adult use marijuana products, immature marijuana plants and seedlings to consumers.

You’d need a marijuana store license in order to open a marijuana dispensary in Maine

What are the steps to open a dispensary in Maine?

In order to open a marijuana dispensary in Maine, you’d have to obtain a “marijuana store license” according to the Marijuana Legalization Act. To apply for a license, you’d have to go through three steps:

  • Conditional licensure
  • Local authorization
  • Active licensure

Conditional licensure

All applicants must submit to a criminal history records check, and each applicant for a license will be required to obtain an OMP-issued Individual Identification Card (IIC). Within 90 days of having submitted all application forms and required attachments, the OMP will either deny the license or issue a non-renewable conditional license valid for one year.

Local authorization

In order to be eligible for an active license, all conditional licensees must seek local authorization at the municipality they are operating in. The municipality will have 90 days to determine the request and then send an approved local authorization form directly to the OMP. Within 10 days of receiving an approved local authorization form, the OMP will request supplemental information and updated documents from the applicant.

Active licensure

Supplemental information required for the issuance of an active license includes evidence of compliance with all electrical and permitting requirements and appropriate tax information and documents. Upon satisfaction that all requirements have been met, OMP will invoice the applicant for the licensing fee. Once payment is received, OMP will issue an active license that is valid for one year.

RELATED POST: MAINE MARIJUANA LICENSE: HOW TO APPLY

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General licensing criteria

According to Maine’s Marijuana Legalization Act, in order to open a marijuana dispensary in Maine, your application for a cannabis establishment license has to comply with each of the following requirements:

  • Age. The applicant must be at least 21 years of age. If the applicant is a business entity, every officer, director, manager and general partner of the business entity must be at least 21 years of age.
  • Residence. If the applicant is a natural person, the applicant must be a Maine resident. If the applicant is a business entity:
    • Every officer, director, manager and general partner of the business entity must be a natural person who is a resident; and
    • A majority of the shares, membership interests, partnership interests or other equity ownership interests as applicable to the business entity must be held or owned by natural persons who are residents or business entities whose owners are all natural persons who are residents.
  • Incorporation in state. If the applicant is a business entity, the business entity must be incorporated in the State of Maine or otherwise formed or organized under the laws of the State of Maine.
  • No disqualifying drug offense. The applicant may not have been previously convicted of a disqualifying drug offense.
  • Not an employee of a state agency. The applicant may not be employed by the department or any other state agency with regulatory authority.
  • Not a law enforcement officer or correction officer. The applicant may not be a law enforcement officer.
  • No license revocation. The applicant may not have had a license previously issued under Maine’s legislation revoked.
  • No medical registry identification card or registration certificate revocation. The applicant may not have had a registry identification card or registration certificate previously issued pursuant to the Maine Medical Use of Marijuana Act revoked.
  • No revocation of other state marijuana license, permit, certificate or other government-issued authorization. The applicant may not have had a license, permit, certificate or other government-issued authorization issued in another jurisdiction allowing the cultivation, manufacture, testing or sale of marijuana or marijuana products revoked.
  • No outstanding court-ordered payments. A license may not be issued to an applicant that has any outstanding payments due in the State of Maine on court-ordered fines, court-appointed attorney’s fees or court-ordered restitution.
  • Criminal history record check. The applicant must have submitted to a criminal history record check.
  • Compliance with application process; no false statement of material fact. The applicant must have completed all application forms required by the department fully and truthfully and complied with all information requests of the department relating to the license application. A license may not be issued to an applicant that has knowingly or recklessly made any false statement of material fact to the department in applying for a license.

Further, the department has to consider, in order to grant a cannabis establishment license, the following additional licensing requirements:

    • Other convictions. The applicant shall submit information regarding the applicant’s criminal convictions in this State or in another jurisdiction for any offense involving dishonesty, deception, misappropriation or fraud. The applicant may submit and the department shall consider if submitted any information regarding the applicant’s criminal history record, including, but not limited to, evidence of rehabilitation, character references and educational achievements, with special consideration given to the time between the applicant’s last criminal conviction and the consideration by the department of the application for licensure.
  • Tax compliance. The applicant has to submit the following:
    • The applicant’s history of paying income and other taxes owed to the State, to another jurisdiction, if applicable, and to the United States Internal Revenue Service over the 2 years immediately preceding the year in which the application is filed; and
    • Any outstanding tax liens imposed or levied against the applicant in this State or in another jurisdiction within the 5 years immediately preceding the year in which the application is filed.
  • Other state marijuana-related violations or penalties. If the applicant has held a license, permit, certificate or other government-issued authorization in another jurisdiction allowing the cultivation, manufacture, testing or sale of marijuana or marijuana products, the applicant shall submit information regarding any violations by or penalties imposed on the applicant in that other jurisdiction.

Causes for denial of a Maine marijuana license

The department may deny an application for a Maine marijuana establishment license for a “good cause”. Maine’s legislation defines a “good cause” as follows:

  • An applicant or licensee has violated, does not meet or has failed to comply with any of the terms, conditions or provisions of the legislation regarding the licensing process.
  • An applicant or licensee has failed to comply with any special terms, consent decree or conditions placed upon the previously issued license pursuant to an order of the department; the municipality in which the licensed premises are located; the town or plantation in the unorganized and deorganized areas in which the licensed premises are located; in the case of a township in the unorganized and deorganized areas in which the licensed premises are located, the county commissioners of the county in which the township is located; or, in the case of a marijuana establishment located in the unorganized and deorganized areas, the Maine Land Use Planning Commission.

Upon the department’s determination to deny a license application, the department shall notify the applicant in writing of the denial, the basis for the denial and the applicant’s right to appeal the denial to the Superior Court

Official costs associated with the application for a Maine marijuana license

  • Application fee: $250
  • Annual licensure fee: No more than $2,500 (depends on your municipality)

Other than these, you’d also have to consider your budget to cover your business operations. The amount of money you’d need to raise will highly depend on the expected scale of your business, if you need more information, you can contact us so we can give you some guidance on the matter.

Also, make sure to check out our Map of Marijuana Legality by State, so you can stay updated on where the industry is standing regarding cannabis legalization.

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How to open a marijuana dispensary in Maine


April 15, 2021 6:24 pm

Thursday, April 15, 2021 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Thursday, April 15, 2021 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Two small brown square fuzzy stuffed animals- both dressed adorably in a bunny suit and duck suit- sits among blooming flowery trees.

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Thursday, April 15, 2021 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Schumer Says It’s Time To End Federal Cannabis Prohibition (Gothamist)

// California Bill To Legalize Possession Of Psychedelics Clears Second Senate Committee (Marijuana Moment)

// Wisconsin Governor ‘Tired’ Of Marijuana Revenue Going To Illinois Next Door (Marijuana Moment)


These headlines are brought to you by Cova Software, the number one dispensary point-of-sale system in North America! Swing over today to see why two thirds of all Canadian cannabis stores run on Cova software, which is also the fastest growing dispensary software in the U.S., with more than a hundred new client dispensaries open for business in January alone!


// Sixth Minnesota House Committee Approves Marijuana Legalization Bill On Its Path To The Floor (Marijuana Moment)

// Swap the crop? New York hemp farmers eager to grow marijuana

// Jushi Buying Dalitso Facility For $22 Million (My Journal Courier (AP)) (Green Market Report)

// Valens Q1 Revenue Increases 25% Sequentially to C$20 Million (New Cannabis Ventures)

// Alabama Medical Marijuana Bill Moves Closer To Floor Vote With House Committee Action (Marijuana Moment)

// Neighbor states give Illinois $10 million in cannabis taxes every month (Leafly)

// With State Law Against Drug Possession Overturned Washington Governor Frees 15 People From Prison (Marijuana Moment)

Check out our other projects:Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement. • Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

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Thursday, April 15, 2021 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News


April 15, 2021 5:43 pm

Massachusetts Marijuana Retailer License Application

Massachusetts Marijuana Retailer License Application

Massachusetts Marijuana Retailer License

Massachusetts Marijuana Retailer License

Massachusetts Marijuana Retailer License Application

Applying for a Massachusetts Marijuana Retailer License is the first step any cannabis entrepreneur that resides in the bay state should take care of if they want to open a dispensary.

The Cannabis Control Commission (CCC) is responsible for promulgating regulations relating to marijuana, processing business applications and issuing licenses, and creating policies and procedures which “promote and encourage full participation in the regulated marijuana industry by people from communities that have previously been disproportionately harmed by marijuana prohibition and enforcement and to positively impact those communities.

According to the latest legislation, a Massachusetts Marijuana Retailer License is a legal document which authorizes entities to purchase and deliver marijuana and marijuana products from Marijuana Establishments and to sell or otherwise transfer marijuana and marijuana products to Marijuana Establishments and to consumers.

According to the CCC, similar to marijuana for medical use, edible marijuana products for adult use shall not be considered food and therefore Marijuana Retailers would not be subject to inspection by local Boards of Health under 105 CMR 590 unless local regulations requiring such inspections are promulgated.

A Marijuana Retailer provides a retail location which may be accessed by consumers 21 years of age or older or, if the retailer is co-located with a RMD by individuals who are registered qualifying patients with the Medical Use of Marijuana Program with a registration card.

How to apply for a Massachusetts Marijuana Retailer License

The first step to applying for a Massachusetts Marijuana Retailer License is to submit the license application fee and all three (3) sections of the application:

  • Application of Intent,
  • Background Check, and
  • Management and Operations Profile.

Each section requires applicants to provide accurate information about the business, individuals and entities associated with the business and to demonstrate understanding of, and plans to comply with, the Commission’s regulations that are specific to the applicant’s license type, location, and scale. The adult- and medical-use license applications have essentially the same requirements with differences highlighted in the following sections.

In order to submit these sections, you’d need to create an account in MassCIPortal’s webpage and log into the portal, navigate through the page and start the application virtually.

Application of Intent

The Application of Intent (AOI) requires the applicant to disclose Persons or Entities Having Direct or Indirect Control in their application for licensure. Persons or Entities Having Indirect Control means any person or entity having indirect control over operations of a ME or MTC. It specifically includes any person with a controlling interest in an indirect holding or parent company of the applicant, and the chief executive officer and executive director of those companies, or any person or entity in a position indirectly to control the decision-making of a Marijuana Establishment (ME) or a Marijuana Treatment Center (MTC).

Applicants are encouraged to include individuals that exert control through the contribution of services. For example, an individual may exert control by making decisions about the establishment management or operations. Applicants do not need to disclose individuals who provide services and do not exert control. For example, applicants do not need to disclose consultants who consult but do not make decisions for the establishment.

In this phase, all applicants would have to disclose and submit the following:

  • In-State Interests
  • Out-of-State Interests
  • Capital Resources
  • Bond or Escrow
  • Property Identification and Interest Documentation
  • Host Community Agreement Certification
  • Community Outreach Meeting Attestation and Documentation
  • Plan to Remain Compliant with Local Ordinance
  • Plan to Positively Impact Disproportionately Harmed People
  • Application Fee

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Background Check

In this phase of the Massachusetts Cannabis License Application, all applicants must list all relevant individuals and entities along with all background disclosures and authorization forms. Each individual or entity listed in the Applicant of Intent section shall also be listed in the Background Check section. Individuals and entities will undergo an in-depth background check and individuals will submit to fingerprinting checks. 

The Commission is required to make a determination of suitability for licensure for each individual and entity listed on an application, which is based, in part on the background checks. Background checks will include, but not be limited to, a review of the following:

  • Massachusetts’ and national criminal database records; 
  • Massachusetts’ and national civil database records, including professional and occupational records; 
  • The individual and entity’s involvement in other marijuana-related businesses; and
  • Any actions taken against any license or registration held by the individual or entity. 
  • Further, all applicants will be required to disclose the following information:
  • A description of any criminal action, whether felony or misdemeanor, that resulted in a conviction, guilty plea, plea of nolo contendere, or admission to sufficient facts; 
  • A description of any civil action, including actions related to a professional, occupational, or fraudulent practice; 
  • A description of any administrative action, including actions related to a medical- or adult-use marijuana operation; 
  • A description of any disciplinary action taken in any jurisdiction against a license, registration, or certification held by the individual or entity, such as a suspension or revocation, including, but not limited to, a license to prescribe or distribute controlled substances; and 
  • A description of any license denial.

Applicants are not required to provide information about any conviction that has been sealed or expunged by court order.

Management and Operations Profile 

The information required as part of this section is an indicator that the applicant understands the legal requirements to operate an ME, including the Commission’s regulations, has plans that are specific to the applicant’s license type, location and scale. and will be able to operate in a lawful manner.

In order to comply with this phase of the Massachusetts Cannabis License application, all applicants would need to provide the following:

  • Business Information, Articles of Organization, and Bylaws
  • Certificates of Good Standing
  • Business Plan, Liability Insurance Plan, & Proposed Timeline
  • Summary of Operating Plans, Policies, and Procedures
  • Diversity Plan

Taxes on retail sales

An excise tax is hereby imposed upon the sale of marijuana or marijuana products by a marijuana retailer to anyone other than a marijuana establishment at a rate of 3.75 per cent of the total sales price received by the marijuana retailer as a consideration for the sale of marijuana or marijuana products. The excise tax shall be levied in addition to state tax imposed upon the sale of property or services as provided in section 2 of chapter 64H of the General Laws and shall be paid by a marijuana retailer to the commissioner at the time provided for filing the return required by section 16 of chapter 62C of the General Laws

Any city or town may impose a local sales tax upon the sale or transfer of marijuana or marijuana products by a marijuana retailer operating within the city or town to anyone other than a marijuana establishment at a rate not greater than 2 per cent of the total sales price received by the marijuana retailer as a consideration for the sale of marijuana or marijuana products. A marijuana retailer shall pay a local sales tax imposed under this section to the commissioner at the same time and in the same manner as the sales tax due to the commonwealth.

All sums received by the commissioner under this section shall not be considered received on account of the commonwealth and shall at least quarterly be distributed, credited and paid by the state treasurer upon certification of the commissioner to each city or town that has adopted this section in proportion to the amount of such sums received from the sale or transfer of marijuana and marijuana products in the city or town.

What are the costs for a Massachusetts Cannabis License?

In order to obtain a Massachusetts Cannabis Retail License, there’s no minimum amount of capital resources that must be demonstrated. In this sense. In this sense we’d recommend any ME applicant to aim for $250,000 – $1,000,000 depending on the size and scope of their operation.

Further, applicants are required to set aside, either through a bond or an escrow account, an amount of money sufficient to cover the dismantling and winding down of the Marijuana Establishment. The amount set aside must be enough to cover the cost of satisfying any outstanding state or municipal sales tax obligations, costs incurred securing the licensee’s facility, and cost incurred for destroying the marijuana and marijuana products in its inventory. 

If the applicant acquires a bond, the applicant is required to set aside the total amount of their licensing fees as set forth in 935 CMR 500.005 or 501.005, even if the fees have been waived. If the applicant establishes an escrow account, the applicant must set aside at least $5,000 and is encouraged to set aside the total amount of their licensing fees, even if the fees have been waived. 

If the applicant acquires a bond, the bond should reflect the following:

  • The applicant is the Principal;
  • The Commonwealth of Massachusetts Cannabis Control Commission, 2 Washington Square, Worcester, MA, 01604, is the obligee; 
  • The purpose of the bond is to cover any costs incurred by the Commission to satisfy any outstanding state and local sales tax obligations, costs incurred to secure any licensed marijuana facility, costs incurred to destroy the marijuana and marijuana products in its inventory, and to cover other costs incurred by the Commission or its designee in dismantling or winding down of the licensee’s facility in accordance with its policies and governing laws. 

If the applicant establishes an escrow account, the account should reflect the following:

  • The Commonwealth of Massachusetts Cannabis Control Commission, 2 Washington Square, Worcester, MA, 01604, is the sole beneficiary; and 
  • The purpose of the bond is to cover any costs incurred by the Commission to satisfy any outstanding state and local sales tax obligations, costs incurred to secure any licensed marijuana facility, costs incurred to destroy the marijuana and marijuana products in its inventory, and to cover other costs incurred by the Commission or its designee in dismantling or winding down of the licensee’s facility in accordance with its policies and governing laws

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Cannabis Lawyer

Thomas Howard has been in business for years and can help yours navigate towards more profitable waters.