CannaSearch Daily on CBD + Hemp

PubMed: Cannabinoids in epilepsy: clinical efficacy and pharmacological considerations

PubMed: Cannabinoids in epilepsy: clinical efficacy and pharmacological considerations

Neurologia (Engl Ed). 2021 Nov 22:S2173-5808(21)00182-6. doi: 10.1016/j.nrleng.2020.02.012. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Advances in the development of drugs with novel mechanisms of action have not been sufficient to significantly reduce the percentage of patients presenting drug-resistant epilepsy. This lack of satisfactory clinical results has led to the search for more effective treatment alternatives with new mechanisms of action.

DEVELOPMENT: The aim of this study is to examine epidemiological aspects of the use of cannabis-based products for the treatment of epilepsy, with particular emphasis on the main mechanisms of action, indications for use, clinical efficacy, and safety. We conducted a narrative review of articles gathered from the PubMed, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases and from the reference sections of relevant publications.

CONCLUSIONS: In recent years there has been growing interest in the use of cannabis-based products for the treatment of a wide range of diseases, including epilepsy. The cannabis plant is currently known to contain more than 100 terpenophenolic compounds, known as cannabinoids. The 2 most abundant are delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol. Studies of preclinical models of epilepsy have shown that these cannabinoids have anticonvulsant properties, and 100% purified cannabidiol and cannabidiol-enriched cannabis extracts are now being used to treat epilepsy in humans. Several open-label studies and randomised controlled clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of these products.

PMID:34824031 | DOI:10.1016/j.nrleng.2020.02.012

#CBD #Hemp https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34824031/?utm_source=Chrome&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1jYCQzi_o_qLYr-oQfnMhShgOXkvGma3vcnBGJtrBhuJMOvEVJ&fc=None&ff=20211127055846&v=2.15.0 November 26, 2021 11:00 am

PubMed: Self-Assembly System Based on Cyclodextrin for Targeted Delivery of Cannabidiol

PubMed: Self-Assembly System Based on Cyclodextrin for Targeted Delivery of Cannabidiol

Front Chem. 2021 Nov 8;9:754832. doi: 10.3389/fchem.2021.754832. eCollection 2021.

ABSTRACT

Cannabidiol (CBD) is one specific kind of the cannabinoid in Cannabis sativa L with a wide range of pharmacological activities. However, the poor water solubility and specificity of CBD limits its application in pharmaceutical field. For solving these problems, in this work, we successfully prepared a targeted carrier by grafting biotin (BIO) onto ethylenediamine-β-Cyclodextrin (EN-CD) in a single step to generate a functionalized supramolecule, named BIO-CD. Subsequently, an amantadine-conjugated cannabinoids (AD-CBD) was prepared and self-assembled with the BIO-CD. A series of methods were used to characterize the inclusion behavior and physicochemical properties of AD-CBD and BIO-CD. The results showed that AD-CBD entered the cavity of BIO-CD and formed a 1:1 host-guest inclusion complex. MTT assay and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) revealed that the targeting effect and anticancer activity of AD-CBD/BIO-CD inclusion complex against three human cancer cell lines were higher than BIO-CD, AD-CBD and free CBD. Moreover, the inclusion complex could release drugs under weakly acidic conditions. These results demonstrated that AD-CBD/BIO-CD inclusion complex possess excellent targeted and anticancer activity, which is hopeful to be applied in clinic as a new therapeutic approach.

PMID:34820356 | PMC:PMC8606678 | DOI:10.3389/fchem.2021.754832

#CBD #Hemp https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34820356/?utm_source=Chrome&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1jYCQzi_o_qLYr-oQfnMhShgOXkvGma3vcnBGJtrBhuJMOvEVJ&fc=None&ff=20211126060004&v=2.15.0 November 25, 2021 11:00 am

PubMed: Self-Assembly System Based on Cyclodextrin for Targeted Delivery of Cannabidiol

PubMed: Self-Assembly System Based on Cyclodextrin for Targeted Delivery of Cannabidiol

Front Chem. 2021 Nov 8;9:754832. doi: 10.3389/fchem.2021.754832. eCollection 2021.

ABSTRACT

Cannabidiol (CBD) is one specific kind of the cannabinoid in Cannabis sativa L with a wide range of pharmacological activities. However, the poor water solubility and specificity of CBD limits its application in pharmaceutical field. For solving these problems, in this work, we successfully prepared a targeted carrier by grafting biotin (BIO) onto ethylenediamine-β-Cyclodextrin (EN-CD) in a single step to generate a functionalized supramolecule, named BIO-CD. Subsequently, an amantadine-conjugated cannabinoids (AD-CBD) was prepared and self-assembled with the BIO-CD. A series of methods were used to characterize the inclusion behavior and physicochemical properties of AD-CBD and BIO-CD. The results showed that AD-CBD entered the cavity of BIO-CD and formed a 1:1 host-guest inclusion complex. MTT assay and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) revealed that the targeting effect and anticancer activity of AD-CBD/BIO-CD inclusion complex against three human cancer cell lines were higher than BIO-CD, AD-CBD and free CBD. Moreover, the inclusion complex could release drugs under weakly acidic conditions. These results demonstrated that AD-CBD/BIO-CD inclusion complex possess excellent targeted and anticancer activity, which is hopeful to be applied in clinic as a new therapeutic approach.

PMID:34820356 | PMC:PMC8606678 | DOI:10.3389/fchem.2021.754832

#CBD #Hemp https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34820356/?utm_source=Chrome&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1jYCQzi_o_qLYr-oQfnMhShgOXkvGma3vcnBGJtrBhuJMOvEVJ&fc=None&ff=20211126060004&v=2.15.0 November 25, 2021 11:00 am

German group proposes commission, urges coalition not to ‘forget’ about hemp

German group proposes commission, urges coalition not to ‘forget’ about hemp
German group proposes commission, urges coalition not to ‘forget’ about hemp

Germany’s Cannabis Business Industry Association (BvCW) has cheered the incoming governing coalition’s plans to establish a licensing program for marijuana dispensaries, but reminded the parties…

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#CBD #Hemp

German group proposes commission, urges coalition not to ‘forget’ about hemp


November 25, 2021 10:26 am

Tracking Federal Grants Funding the U.S. Hemp Industry

Tracking Federal Grants Funding the U.S. Hemp Industry

hemp grant funding

By Eric Singular, Director, Hemp Business Journal

When the 2018 Farm Bill was signed into law, the designation of industrial hemp shifted from that of a controlled substance to an agricultural commodity a change which opened the doors for businesses, universities, and hemp industry stakeholders to gain access to government funding sources. Over the last few years, a handful of federal, state, and local grants have been awarded to fund industrial hemp research and market development.

One early recipient of federal grant funds was Cornell University: In August 2019, Senator Charles Schumer (D-NY) helped secure $500,000 from the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Agriculture Research Service for the nation’s only industrial hemp germplasm repository, at Cornell AgriTech located in Geneva.

It was a milestone for industrial hemp as an agricultural commodity, as the project was the first in the United States since prohibition to collect a seed bank for research, breeding, and conservation of the cannabis sativa L. species (i.e., hemp). The comprehensive collection of hemp genetics has been incorporated into the National Plant Germplasm System. Cornell’s hemp genetics curation and research enhances both characterizations and evaluations for agronomic performance and end-product quality traits to assist in plant breeding.

The National Industrial Hemp Council (NIHC), an industry trade advocacy organization to promote long-term growth and profitability of the North American industrial hemp industry, was another early recipient of federal grant funding. In November 2020, USDA’s Market Access Program allocated $200,000 to the NIHC to spearhead market research and trade facilitation with an emphasis on hemp markets in Asia and Europe. It came less than a year after it was announced that China would be required to import “true hemp” under the Phase One agreement of the U.S.-China trade deal.

In December 2020, the USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture’s (NIFA) announced that it would begin accepting requests for proposals through its Sustainable Agriculture Systems (SAS) program, with the mission of improving plant and animal production, sustainability, human and environmental health, and advancing innovative research to promote land stewardship, a call to minimize the impact of climate change on agriculture and meet rising demand for food.

In January, the USDA’s Supplemental and Alternative Crops (SAC) grant program awarded $125,000 per year for a project period of up to four years to support the breeding, testing, and development of “superior performing” industrial hemp varieties. In March, NIFA grants included nearly $300,000 to Colorado State University for a study on hemp viruses and viroids, and another $300,000 to Oregon State University on feeding spent hemp biomass to cattle, i.e., its Cannabinoid Residuals, Animal Health, and Product Quality program. The funds were part of $8.5 million in funding spread across 29 research and extension grants.

That same month, Pennsylvania Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding announced nearly $160,000 in state funds for three projects to increase consumer awareness of industrial hemp products, opening additional market opportunities for growers and processors in the commonwealth.

Weed control and pathogen resistance have been areas of focus for grant funding. In September, it was announced that Lynn Sosnoskie, assistant professor in Cornell’s  School of Integrative Plant Science, would lead a $325,000 hemp weed-management study.

Last month, as part of a $146 million investment through the SAS program, $20 million was granted to two university-led industrial hemp research projects extending over the next five years. Oregon State University’s Global Hemp Innovation Center received $10 million to identify economic opportunities for hemp in the Western U.S. The other $10 million was granted to Wilberforce, Ohio-based Central State University (CSU) to research the viability of using hemp as an aquaculture or fish-farming feed ingredient to address food-safety concerns about consuming seafood raised with feed additives.

The funds to Oregon State will be split among eight universities (including $1.3 million to Washington State University, the University of California, Davis; and the University of Nevada, Reno Extension), plus the USDA, the Agricultural Research Service; the U.S. Department of Transportation, Volpe National Transportation Systems Research Center, the Federally Recognized Tribes Extension Program; 7 Generations (a Native American-owned firm specializing in Indian Country business development); the National Agricultural Library and the USDA’s Western Rural Development Center. As the region is generally arid and comprises both irrigated and dryland farming, the project will assess the transportation corridor connecting Washington, Oregon, Nevada, and California east of the Cascade-Sierra Nevada Mountains from Canada to Mexico to spur the industrial hemp sector for Native American and other regional businesses and farmers in the Western Pacific region.

On the other hand, researchers at Central State will partner with each the College of Menominee Nation, Kentucky State University, University of Delaware, University of Kentucky, and Mississippi State University for a project that pursues the approval of hemp grain as a sustainable feed ingredient to produce high-value, nutrient-dense fish, the better to both expand domestic markets for hemp and create a more diverse workforce in agriculture. Additionally, the project will serve to increase diversity in aquaculture by training Black and Native American graduates in agriculture, and increase economic markets and production sustainability for seafood and hemp.

Project lead Brandy Phipps, Ph.D., a research assistant professor of food, nutrition and health at Central State, explained how stated that “when we think about high-value fish—like rainbow trout, which is what we’re going to be working with—for them to be grown in fisheries and aquaculture, they typically have to be provided with fish oil and fish meal. These products most often are sourced from wild-caught fish, which is both expensive and impacts the environmental sustainability of the system. It also tends to be the most expensive ingredient in aquaculture feed. So, if we can replace some or all of the fish oil or fish meal with hemp products, we have now transformed a system to produce nutrient-dense fish in a way that may be less burdensome to the environment and at a better price point for both the producers and consumers.”

In September, the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture (NASDA) urged the USDA to split industrial hemp into two distinct categories for grant-funding purposes depending on the crop’s intended use. While hemp grown for cannabinoid production would likely remain under USDA’s Specialty Crop Block Grant Program, hemp production for grain and fiber could be designated as an agronomic commodity. That could be significant both for future industrial hemp research and development and its commercialization, as it would open new channels for grant funding and subsidy considerations.

Federal grants for hemp research are not without critics. Some have pointed to potential conflicts of interest, while others have commented that the recently awarded $20 million to Oregon State and Central State could have been used to fund building decorticators facilities for hemp fiber-processing in the U.S. Overall, critics have contended that USDA and its adjacent agencies should do more to leverage insights from industry stakeholders in making decisions about allocating grant finds. However, it should be noted that the request for grant proposals and the reviewal process are stringent, and thus limited in their latitude. For now, it seems that mostly grant funds have been awarded to university-led, research projects focused on genetic, agronomic, and market development.

Overall, the USDA has awarded $21,875,000 in grants to fund hemp research and market development since the passage of the 2018 Farm Bill. While this number has been greatly increased by funds recently awarded to Oregon State and Central State through the SAS program, it is a drop in the bucket for agricultural grant-funding in the U.S. In April, the USDA made more than $330 million available to help agricultural producers and organizations in the food supply chain recover from the financial impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Just last month, the agency announced an investment of more than $243 million in grants to support specialty crops.

If Biden’s climate plan (which includes incentives for carbon farming for which industrial hemp could be well-suited) survives the Congressional Budget Office, the U.S. government is going to need to throw significant financial support at the hemp industry to bolster swift growth of the market and success for stakeholders across the value chain. For now, the Cannabis and Hemp Research program at the University of California, Davis tracks a robust list of the grant funds currently available for industrial hemp.

The post Tracking Federal Grants Funding the U.S. Hemp Industry appeared first on New Frontier Data.

#CBD #Hemp https://newfrontierdata.com/cannabis-insights/tracking-federal-grants-funding-the-u-s-hemp-industry/ November 24, 2021 11:06 am

Tracking Federal Grants Funding the U.S. Hemp Industry

Tracking Federal Grants Funding the U.S. Hemp Industry

hemp grant funding

By Eric Singular, Director, Hemp Business Journal

When the 2018 Farm Bill was signed into law, the designation of industrial hemp shifted from that of a controlled substance to an agricultural commodity a change which opened the doors for businesses, universities, and hemp industry stakeholders to gain access to government funding sources. Over the last few years, a handful of federal, state, and local grants have been awarded to fund industrial hemp research and market development.

One early recipient of federal grant funds was Cornell University: In August 2019, Senator Charles Schumer (D-NY) helped secure $500,000 from the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Agriculture Research Service for the nation’s only industrial hemp germplasm repository, at Cornell AgriTech located in Geneva.

It was a milestone for industrial hemp as an agricultural commodity, as the project was the first in the United States since prohibition to collect a seed bank for research, breeding, and conservation of the cannabis sativa L. species (i.e., hemp). The comprehensive collection of hemp genetics has been incorporated into the National Plant Germplasm System. Cornell’s hemp genetics curation and research enhances both characterizations and evaluations for agronomic performance and end-product quality traits to assist in plant breeding.

The National Industrial Hemp Council (NIHC), an industry trade advocacy organization to promote long-term growth and profitability of the North American industrial hemp industry, was another early recipient of federal grant funding. In November 2020, USDA’s Market Access Program allocated $200,000 to the NIHC to spearhead market research and trade facilitation with an emphasis on hemp markets in Asia and Europe. It came less than a year after it was announced that China would be required to import “true hemp” under the Phase One agreement of the U.S.-China trade deal.

In December 2020, the USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture’s (NIFA) announced that it would begin accepting requests for proposals through its Sustainable Agriculture Systems (SAS) program, with the mission of improving plant and animal production, sustainability, human and environmental health, and advancing innovative research to promote land stewardship, a call to minimize the impact of climate change on agriculture and meet rising demand for food.

In January, the USDA’s Supplemental and Alternative Crops (SAC) grant program awarded $125,000 per year for a project period of up to four years to support the breeding, testing, and development of “superior performing” industrial hemp varieties. In March, NIFA grants included nearly $300,000 to Colorado State University for a study on hemp viruses and viroids, and another $300,000 to Oregon State University on feeding spent hemp biomass to cattle, i.e., its Cannabinoid Residuals, Animal Health, and Product Quality program. The funds were part of $8.5 million in funding spread across 29 research and extension grants.

That same month, Pennsylvania Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding announced nearly $160,000 in state funds for three projects to increase consumer awareness of industrial hemp products, opening additional market opportunities for growers and processors in the commonwealth.

Weed control and pathogen resistance have been areas of focus for grant funding. In September, it was announced that Lynn Sosnoskie, assistant professor in Cornell’s  School of Integrative Plant Science, would lead a $325,000 hemp weed-management study.

Last month, as part of a $146 million investment through the SAS program, $20 million was granted to two university-led industrial hemp research projects extending over the next five years. Oregon State University’s Global Hemp Innovation Center received $10 million to identify economic opportunities for hemp in the Western U.S. The other $10 million was granted to Wilberforce, Ohio-based Central State University (CSU) to research the viability of using hemp as an aquaculture or fish-farming feed ingredient to address food-safety concerns about consuming seafood raised with feed additives.

The funds to Oregon State will be split among eight universities (including $1.3 million to Washington State University, the University of California, Davis; and the University of Nevada, Reno Extension), plus the USDA, the Agricultural Research Service; the U.S. Department of Transportation, Volpe National Transportation Systems Research Center, the Federally Recognized Tribes Extension Program; 7 Generations (a Native American-owned firm specializing in Indian Country business development); the National Agricultural Library and the USDA’s Western Rural Development Center. As the region is generally arid and comprises both irrigated and dryland farming, the project will assess the transportation corridor connecting Washington, Oregon, Nevada, and California east of the Cascade-Sierra Nevada Mountains from Canada to Mexico to spur the industrial hemp sector for Native American and other regional businesses and farmers in the Western Pacific region.

On the other hand, researchers at Central State will partner with each the College of Menominee Nation, Kentucky State University, University of Delaware, University of Kentucky, and Mississippi State University for a project that pursues the approval of hemp grain as a sustainable feed ingredient to produce high-value, nutrient-dense fish, the better to both expand domestic markets for hemp and create a more diverse workforce in agriculture. Additionally, the project will serve to increase diversity in aquaculture by training Black and Native American graduates in agriculture, and increase economic markets and production sustainability for seafood and hemp.

Project lead Brandy Phipps, Ph.D., a research assistant professor of food, nutrition and health at Central State, explained how stated that “when we think about high-value fish—like rainbow trout, which is what we’re going to be working with—for them to be grown in fisheries and aquaculture, they typically have to be provided with fish oil and fish meal. These products most often are sourced from wild-caught fish, which is both expensive and impacts the environmental sustainability of the system. It also tends to be the most expensive ingredient in aquaculture feed. So, if we can replace some or all of the fish oil or fish meal with hemp products, we have now transformed a system to produce nutrient-dense fish in a way that may be less burdensome to the environment and at a better price point for both the producers and consumers.”

In September, the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture (NASDA) urged the USDA to split industrial hemp into two distinct categories for grant-funding purposes depending on the crop’s intended use. While hemp grown for cannabinoid production would likely remain under USDA’s Specialty Crop Block Grant Program, hemp production for grain and fiber could be designated as an agronomic commodity. That could be significant both for future industrial hemp research and development and its commercialization, as it would open new channels for grant funding and subsidy considerations.

Federal grants for hemp research are not without critics. Some have pointed to potential conflicts of interest, while others have commented that the recently awarded $20 million to Oregon State and Central State could have been used to fund building decorticators facilities for hemp fiber-processing in the U.S. Overall, critics have contended that USDA and its adjacent agencies should do more to leverage insights from industry stakeholders in making decisions about allocating grant finds. However, it should be noted that the request for grant proposals and the reviewal process are stringent, and thus limited in their latitude. For now, it seems that mostly grant funds have been awarded to university-led, research projects focused on genetic, agronomic, and market development.

Overall, the USDA has awarded $21,875,000 in grants to fund hemp research and market development since the passage of the 2018 Farm Bill. While this number has been greatly increased by funds recently awarded to Oregon State and Central State through the SAS program, it is a drop in the bucket for agricultural grant-funding in the U.S. In April, the USDA made more than $330 million available to help agricultural producers and organizations in the food supply chain recover from the financial impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Just last month, the agency announced an investment of more than $243 million in grants to support specialty crops.

If Biden’s climate plan (which includes incentives for carbon farming for which industrial hemp could be well-suited) survives the Congressional Budget Office, the U.S. government is going to need to throw significant financial support at the hemp industry to bolster swift growth of the market and success for stakeholders across the value chain. For now, the Cannabis and Hemp Research program at the University of California, Davis tracks a robust list of the grant funds currently available for industrial hemp.

The post Tracking Federal Grants Funding the U.S. Hemp Industry appeared first on New Frontier Data.

#CBD #Hemp https://newfrontierdata.com/cannabis-insights/tracking-federal-grants-funding-the-u-s-hemp-industry/ November 24, 2021 11:06 am

New laws in Brazil, Argentina could signal ‘radical shift’ in global markets

New laws in Brazil, Argentina could signal ‘radical shift’ in global markets
New laws in Brazil, Argentina could signal ‘radical shift’ in global markets

Proposed laws on the cusp of passage in Brazil and Argentina could lead to “a radical change in the global dynamics of production of industrial…

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#CBD #Hemp

New laws in Brazil, Argentina could signal ‘radical shift’ in global markets


November 23, 2021 11:06 am

October 2021 Office of Women's Health e-Update

October 2021 Office of Women's Health e-Update October 2021 Office of Women’s Health e-Update Anonymous (not verified) Mon, 11/22/2021 – 10:09

Detailed Description
FDA Office of Women’s Health newsletter, with a Message from the Associate Commissioner, Women’s Health Highlights, Call To Action, and upcoming Meetings.

 

Mammogram Detection

Message from the Associate Commissioner

Dear Women’s Health Colleagues,

Many of us know someone who has been affected by breast cancer—a friend, mother, sister, or maybe even yourself. Each year, approximately 255,000 women get diagnosed with breast cancer in the United States and 42,000 die from the disease.¹

Mammograms continue to be the best primary tool for breast cancer screening. Although screening cannot prevent breast cancer, it can help find cancer early, when it is easier to treat. National Breast Cancer Awareness Month serves as a great reminder to ask your healthcare provider about scheduling your mammogram. We invite you to learn more about mammograms here.

While breast cancer is one of the most common cancers among women and top causes of cancer related deaths; heart disease is a leading cause of death for both women and men. Diet is an integral component to preventing and treating heart disease. By limiting sodium, which is a component of salt in our diets, we can help prevent diseases like high blood pressure and heart disease.

In an effort to improve nutrition and reduce disease burden, FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Nutrition (CFSAN) issued a final guidance which provides voluntary short term sodium reduction targets for food manufacturers, chain restaurants and food service operators in an effort to decrease diet-related diseases. Please take a moment to learn about FDA’s nutrition efforts and steps you can take to reduce sodium in your diet.

Sincerely,

Kaveeta Vasisht, M.D., Pharm.D.
Associate Commissioner for Women’s Health
Director, Office of Women’s Health

CORONAVIRUS UPDATES

Below are links to specific COVID-19 topics and the latest vaccine fact sheets, with a full list of the latest COVID-19 information from the FDA here.


CALL TO ACTION

Woman Jogging

Bone and Joint Health National Action Week is observed on October 12-20. More than 10 million people in the U.S. have osteoporosis. Anyone can develop osteoporosis, but it is more common in older women. Even though osteoporosis affects mostly older women, prevention starts when you are younger. No matter your age, you can take steps to build bone mass and prevent bone loss.

For more information on osteoporosis, click here. Download our osteoporosis fact sheet or order in bulk for distribution to the women in your community at www.fda.gov/womenshealthpubs.


WOMEN’S HEALTH HIGHLIGHTS

FDA Permits Marketing of E-Cigarette Products, Marking First Authorization of Its Kind by the Agency

The FDA announced it has authorized the marketing of three new tobacco products, marking the first set of electronic nicotine delivery system (ENDS) products ever to be authorized by the FDA through the Premarket Tobacco Product Application (PMTA) pathway. 

Do Not Use Needle-Free Devices for Injection of Dermal Fillers

The FDA is warning the public and healthcare professionals not to use needle-free devices such as hyaluron pens for injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) or other lip and facial fillers, collectively and commonly referred to as dermal fillers or fillers. 

The FDA is aware of serious injuries and in some cases, permanent harm to the skin, lips, or eyes with the use of needle-free devices for injection of lip and facial fillers.

Specific Lots of Aerosol Sunscreen Spray Products by Coppertone: Recall – Due to the Presence of Benzene

Coppertone is recalling twelve lots of five Coppertone aerosol sunscreen spray products manufactured between the dates of January 10, 2021 and June 15, 2021. Coppertone has identified the presence of benzene in these lots. Benzene is classified as a human carcinogen. Exposure to benzene can occur through inhalation, oral, and skin and it could, depending on the level and extent of exposure, result in an increased risk of cancers including leukemia, and blood cancer of the bone marrow and other blood disorders which can be life-threatening.

Youth E-cigarette Use Remains Serious Public Health Concern Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

A study released by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimated that more than 2 million U.S. middle and high school students reported currently using e-cigarettes in 2021, with more than 8 in 10 of those youth using flavored e-cigarettes.

Risk of Exposure to Unsafe Levels of Radiation with Safe-T-Lite UV WAND

The FDA issued a safety communication to warn consumers that use of the Max-Lux Safe-T-Lite UV WAND may expose the user or person nearby to unsafe levels of ultraviolet-C (UV-C) radiation and may cause injury to the skin, eyes, or both after a few seconds of use.

The FDA is aware that consumers may use the Max-Lux Safe-T-Lite UV WAND to try to disinfect surfaces and kill germs in the home or similar spaces. The FDA recommends that consumers consider using safer alternative disinfection methods, such as general-purpose disinfectants.

Essure: Update on Adverse Event Reports

The FDA remains committed to providing updates on the safety profile of Essure, a permanently implanted birth control device for women. Although Essure has not been available for implantation in the U.S. since December 2019, the FDA continues to monitor the product’s safety through an FDA-required postmarket surveillance study and other activities. FDA is providing an update on the adverse event information received by Bayer (the company that manufactured Essure) as required in the April 24, 2020 variance from Medical Device Reporting requirements.

All Ultrasound Gels and Lotions by Eco-Med Pharmaceutical: Class I Recall – Due to Risk of Bacteria Contamination

All ultrasound gels and lotions manufactured by Eco-Med are being recalled due to risk of bacterial contamination with Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc). The FDA independently confirmed that distributed product tested positive for bacterial contamination. The use of affected ultrasound gels and lotions contaminated with Bcc may lead to serious infections, including bloodstream infections, which may result in sepsis or death.

Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion (LAAO) Devices Potentially Associated with Procedural Outcome Differences Between Women and Men

The FDA issued a Letter to Health Care Providers about the potential for differences in procedural outcomes between women and men undergoing implant of an LAAO device. A recent publication in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Cardiology indicates that major adverse events and lengthened hospital stay may be more common in women compared to men.  

It’s a Good Time to Get Your Flu Vaccine

Fall is here, and it is time to get your seasonal flu vaccine. It’s best to get vaccinated before flu viruses start circulating. Flu viruses typically spread in fall and winter, with activity peaking between December and February. Getting your FDA-approved flu vaccine now can lower your chances of getting the flu.

FDA Takes Steps Aimed at Improving Quality, Safety and Efficacy of Sunscreens

The FDA took steps aimed at improving the quality, safety, and efficacy of sunscreens as part of its implementation of new authorities for certain over-the-counter (OTC) drugs. In the short term, these new authorities essentially preserve status quo marketing conditions for these sunscreens. However, the agency proposed revisions and updates to those requirements related to maximum sun protection factor (SPF) values, active ingredients, broad spectrum requirements, and product labeling, among other provisions.

FDA Authorizes Software that Can Help Identify Prostate Cancer

The FDA authorized marketing of software to assist medical professionals who examine body tissues (pathologists) in the detection of areas that are suspicious for cancer as an adjunct (supplement) to the review of digitally-scanned slide images from prostate biopsies (tissue removed from the body). The software, called Paige Prostate, is the first artificial intelligence (AI)-based software designed to identify an area of interest on the prostate biopsy image with the highest likelihood of harboring cancer so it can be reviewed further by the pathologist if the area of concern has not been identified on initial review.

FDA Approves First Biosimilar to Treat Macular Degeneration Disease and Other Eye Conditions

The FDA approved Byooviz (ranibizumab-nuna) as the first biosimilar to Lucentis (ranibizumab injection) for the treatment of several eye diseases and conditions, including neovascular (wet) age-related macular degeneration (nAMD), a leading cause of vision loss and blindness for Americans aged 65 years and older. Byooviz is also approved to treat macular edema (fluid build-up) following retinal vein occlusion (blockage of veins in the retina) and myopic choroidal neovascularization, a vision-threatening complication of myopia (nearsightedness).

Microneedling – Getting to the Point on Benefits, Risks and Safety

People are using microneedling in a variety of ways, from reducing the appearance of scars to treating fine lines and wrinkles to improve their appearance.

If you are thinking about having a microneedling procedure, the FDA recommends you choose a health care provider who is specially trained in microneedling. Talk with the provider to determine if you are a good candidate for microneedling—not everyone is. And discuss the benefits and risks, including the risk of infection if the microneedling tools are not cleaned or used properly.

Pfizer Expands Voluntary Nationwide Recall to include All Lots of CHANTIX® (Varenicline) Tablets Due to N-Nitroso Varenicline Content

Pfizer is voluntarily recalling all lots of Chantix 0.5 mg and 1 mg Tablets to the patient (consumer/user) level due to the presence of a nitrosamine, N-nitroso-varenicline, at or above the FDA interim acceptable intake limit. As alternative suppliers have been approved in the United States, Pfizer is undertaking this precautionary measure.

Long-term ingestion of N-nitroso-varenicline may be associated with a theoretical potential increased cancer risk in humans, but there is no immediate risk to patients taking this medication. The health benefits of stopping smoking outweigh the theoretical potential cancer risk from the nitrosamine impurity in varenicline.

FDA Releases Quiz About Prescription Drug Promotion and the Bad Ad Program

The FDA’s Bad Ad Program released the Bad Ad quiz to test your knowledge about prescription drug promotion and the FDA’s Bad Ad Program. The Bad Ad Program helps to ensure that information from prescription drug promotion that health care providers may use to inform their assessment of the risks and benefits of a drug is truthful, balanced, and not misleading. 

5 Things to Know about Delta-8 Tetrahydrocannabinol – Delta-8 THC

Delta-8 tetrahydrocannabinol, also known as delta-8 THC, is a psychoactive substance found in the Cannabis sativa plant, of which marijuana and hemp are two varieties. Delta-8 THC is one of over 100 cannabinoids produced naturally by the cannabis plant but is not found in significant amounts in the cannabis plant. As a result, concentrated amounts of delta-8 THC are typically manufactured from hemp-derived cannabidiol (CBD).

It is important for consumers to be aware that delta-8 THC products have not been evaluated or approved by the FDA for safe use in any context. They may be marketed in ways that put the public health at risk and should especially be kept out of reach of children and pets.

Updates on Philips Respironics CPAP, BiPAP, and Ventilator Recall

The FDA updated the frequently asked questions (FAQs) about this recall on FDA.gov: Philips Respironics CPAP, BiPAP, and Ventilator Recall: Frequently Asked Questions.


Pregnancy Registry

Pregnancy exposure registries are studies that collect health information on exposure to medical products such as drugs and vaccines during pregnancy. 
Learn more about pregnancy registries today!


Participate in Upcoming FDA Meetings

Visit FDA Meetings, Conferences and Workshops to find out about available meetings.

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October 2021 Office of Women’s Health e-Update

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FDA Office of Women’s Health newsletter, with a Message from the Associate Commissioner, and Women’s Health Highlights

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Mon, 11/22/2021 – 10:10

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#CBD #Hemp http://www.fda.gov/consumers/collaborate-and-connect/october-2021-office-womens-health-e-update November 22, 2021 3:09 pm

PubMed: Fertilization Following Pollination Predominantly Decreases Phytocannabinoids Accumulation and Alters the Accumulation of Terpenoids in Cannabis Inflorescences

PubMed: Fertilization Following Pollination Predominantly Decreases Phytocannabinoids Accumulation and Alters the Accumulation of Terpenoids in Cannabis Inflorescences

Front Plant Sci. 2021 Nov 5;12:753847. doi: 10.3389/fpls.2021.753847. eCollection 2021.

ABSTRACT

In the last decades, growing evidence showed the therapeutic capabilities of Cannabis plants. These capabilities were attributed to the specialized secondary metabolites stored in the glandular trichomes of female inflorescences, mainly phytocannabinoids and terpenoids. The accumulation of the metabolites in the flower is versatile and influenced by a largely unknown regulation system, attributed to genetic, developmental and environmental factors. As Cannabis is a dioecious plant, one main factor is fertilization after successful pollination. Fertilized flowers are considerably less potent, likely due to changes in the contents of phytocannabinoids and terpenoids; therefore, this study examined the effect of fertilization on metabolite composition by crossbreeding (-)-Δ9trans-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)- or cannabidiol (CBD)-rich female plants with different male plants: THC-rich, CBD-rich, or the original female plant induced to develop male pollen sacs. We used advanced analytical methods to assess the phytocannabinoids and terpenoids content, including a newly developed semi-quantitative analysis for terpenoids without analytical standards. We found that fertilization significantly decreased phytocannabinoids content. For terpenoids, the subgroup of monoterpenoids had similar trends to the phytocannabinoids, proposing both are commonly regulated in the plant. The sesquiterpenoids remained unchanged in the THC-rich female and had a trend of decrease in the CBD-rich female. Additionally, specific phytocannabinoids and terpenoids showed an uncommon increase in concentration followed by fertilization with particular male plants. Our results demonstrate that although the profile of phytocannabinoids and their relative ratios were kept, fertilization substantially decreased the concentration of nearly all phytocannabinoids in the plant regardless of the type of fertilizing male. Our findings may point to the functional roles of secondary metabolites in Cannabis.

PMID:34804093 | PMC:PMC8602813 | DOI:10.3389/fpls.2021.753847

#CBD #Hemp https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34804093/?utm_source=Chrome&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1jYCQzi_o_qLYr-oQfnMhShgOXkvGma3vcnBGJtrBhuJMOvEVJ&fc=None&ff=20211123055850&v=2.15.0 November 22, 2021 11:00 am

Oregon police say cannabis seized in massive bust worth $500 million

Oregon police say cannabis seized in massive bust worth $500 million
Oregon police say cannabis seized in massive bust worth $500 million

While the cops always inflate the numbers, Oregon State Police (OSP) say they seized roughly 250 tons of illegally produced marijuana in Klamath County in…

Read More


#CBD #Hemp

Oregon police say cannabis seized in massive bust worth $500 million


November 22, 2021 7:36 am

PubMed: Cannabis-Based Medicines and Medical Cannabis for Chronic Neuropathic Pain

PubMed: Cannabis-Based Medicines and Medical Cannabis for Chronic Neuropathic Pain

CNS Drugs. 2021 Nov 21. doi: 10.1007/s40263-021-00879-w. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

Neuropathic pain represents a broad category of pain syndromes that include a wide variety of peripheral and central disorders. The overall prevalence of neuropathic pain in the general population is reported to be between 7 and 10%. Management of neuropathic pain presents an unmet clinical need, with less than 50% of patients achieving substantial pain relief with medications currently recommended such as pregabalin, gabapentin, duloxetine and various tricyclic antidepressants. It has been suggested that cannabis-based medicines (CbMs) and medical cannabis (MC) may be a treatment option for those with chronic neuropathic pain. CbMs/MC are available in different forms: licensed medications or medical products (plant-derived and/or synthetic products such as tetrahydrocannabinol or cannabidiol); magistral preparations of cannabis plant derivatives with defined molecular content such as dronabinol (tetrahydrocannabinol); and herbal cannabis with a defined content of tetrahydrocannabinol and/or cannabidiol, together with other active ingredients (phytocannabinoids other than cannabidiol/tetrahydrocannabinol, terpenes and flavonoids). The availability of different types of CbMs/MC varies between countries worldwide. Systematic reviews of available randomised controlled trials have stated low-quality evidence for CbMs and MC for chronic neuropathic pain. Depending on the studies included in the various quantitative syntheses, authors have reached divergent conclusions on the efficacy of CbMs/MC for chronic neuropathic pain (from not effective to a clinically meaningful benefit). Clinically relevant side effects of CbMs/MC, especially for central nervous system and psychiatric disorders, have been reported by some systematic reviews. Recommendations for the use of CbMs/MC for chronic neuropathic pain by various medical associations also differ, from negative recommendations, no recommendation possible, recommended as third-line therapy, or recommended as an alternative in selected cases failing standard therapies within a multimodal concept. After reading this paper, readers are invited to formulate their own conclusions regarding the potential benefits and harms of CbMs/MC for the treatment of chronic neuropathic pain.

PMID:34802112 | DOI:10.1007/s40263-021-00879-w

#CBD #Hemp https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34802112/?utm_source=Chrome&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1jYCQzi_o_qLYr-oQfnMhShgOXkvGma3vcnBGJtrBhuJMOvEVJ&fc=None&ff=20211122055952&v=2.15.0 November 21, 2021 11:00 am

PubMed: Cannabis-Based Medicines and Medical Cannabis for Chronic Neuropathic Pain

PubMed: Cannabis-Based Medicines and Medical Cannabis for Chronic Neuropathic Pain

CNS Drugs. 2021 Nov 21. doi: 10.1007/s40263-021-00879-w. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

Neuropathic pain represents a broad category of pain syndromes that include a wide variety of peripheral and central disorders. The overall prevalence of neuropathic pain in the general population is reported to be between 7 and 10%. Management of neuropathic pain presents an unmet clinical need, with less than 50% of patients achieving substantial pain relief with medications currently recommended such as pregabalin, gabapentin, duloxetine and various tricyclic antidepressants. It has been suggested that cannabis-based medicines (CbMs) and medical cannabis (MC) may be a treatment option for those with chronic neuropathic pain. CbMs/MC are available in different forms: licensed medications or medical products (plant-derived and/or synthetic products such as tetrahydrocannabinol or cannabidiol); magistral preparations of cannabis plant derivatives with defined molecular content such as dronabinol (tetrahydrocannabinol); and herbal cannabis with a defined content of tetrahydrocannabinol and/or cannabidiol, together with other active ingredients (phytocannabinoids other than cannabidiol/tetrahydrocannabinol, terpenes and flavonoids). The availability of different types of CbMs/MC varies between countries worldwide. Systematic reviews of available randomised controlled trials have stated low-quality evidence for CbMs and MC for chronic neuropathic pain. Depending on the studies included in the various quantitative syntheses, authors have reached divergent conclusions on the efficacy of CbMs/MC for chronic neuropathic pain (from not effective to a clinically meaningful benefit). Clinically relevant side effects of CbMs/MC, especially for central nervous system and psychiatric disorders, have been reported by some systematic reviews. Recommendations for the use of CbMs/MC for chronic neuropathic pain by various medical associations also differ, from negative recommendations, no recommendation possible, recommended as third-line therapy, or recommended as an alternative in selected cases failing standard therapies within a multimodal concept. After reading this paper, readers are invited to formulate their own conclusions regarding the potential benefits and harms of CbMs/MC for the treatment of chronic neuropathic pain.

PMID:34802112 | DOI:10.1007/s40263-021-00879-w

#CBD #Hemp https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34802112/?utm_source=Chrome&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1jYCQzi_o_qLYr-oQfnMhShgOXkvGma3vcnBGJtrBhuJMOvEVJ&fc=None&ff=20211122055952&v=2.15.0 November 21, 2021 11:00 am

New leader in tax-haters’ contest

New leader in tax-haters’ contest

A new marijuana legalization bill by freshman Republican U.S. House Member Nancy Mace of South Carolina imposes a tiny three- percent ad valorem tax on the drug, which is not enough to offset the disappearance of the current 280E Selling Expense Tax (which applies only to federally illegal drugs).

To prove how anti-tax she is, the bill adds a “Moratorium” – no increase in that tiny tax for 10 years, unless three-quarters of each House agrees to an increase.  Now that moratorium can be rescinded by a simple majority Act of Congress at any time:  One Congress cannot bind another.  Still the filibuster (requiring 60 Senate votes) could be repealed by a simple majority Act of Congress at any time, but that time has not come.  I know of no current rule tying Congress’s hands on taxes.

In any event, if you’re looking for anti-tax sentiment, the Mace bill tops the list.


#CBD #Hemp
New leader in tax-haters’ contest
November 20, 2021 9:13 pm

GMO Hemp

From Cannabis Evolution and Ethnobotany by Clarke and Merlin:

“Biotechnology in the form of genetic modification has also reached Cannabis. An Irish research group successfully transferred genes for grey mold resistance to an industrial hemp variety (Clarke and Watson 2007). Grey mold is one of the leading pests of Cannabis, causing crop loss and contaminating medical supplies, and the transfer of resistance into medical varieties would therefore be of great value.

Yukihiro Shoyama and colleagues at Fukuoka University in Japan have transferred the THC-synthase gene from Cannabis to tobacco (Nicotiana tobaccum) and induced it to convert CBG (cannabigerol, the precursor molecule to THC) into THC (Shoyama et al. 2001).

Other agronomically valuable traits may also be transferred to Cannabis such as enhanced pest resistance, increased yields of medically valuable compounds, tolerance of environmental extremes, and sexual sterility.

The reaction to development and release of genetically modified (GM) organisms has been guarded. Cannabis presents a particularly high risk of transmitting GM genes to industrial hemp crops and weedy Cannabis because it is wind pollinated.

The EU has installed strict regulations to prevent the accidental release of GM genes, and therefore production of GM Cannabis in the EU may prove impractical. However, nonfood industrial fiber and pharmaceutical cultivars may not receive as much resistance from consumers and environmentalists as food crops.

For example, genes coding for cannabinoid biosynthesis might also be transferred from Cannabis to less politically sensitive organisms than tobacco. However, expression of THC synthesis in a widely distributed plant may also present a new set of obstacles to law enforcement.

On the other hand, transferring cannabinoid synthesis systems from Cannabis into other genera of plants, fungi, and bacteria opens up the possibility of producing medically valuable cannabinoids in industrial fermenters and circumventing Cannabis growing altogether.” [that’s called precision fermentation. RR]

1999: Hemp Foods on National TV x5

In America, the fastest way to introduce something new and spur diffusion and acceptance is through that one-eyed monster, TV. To normalize Cannabis a generation ago, the easiest path was by using marijuana’s red-haired stepchild, hemp. Ironically, hemp has proven to be the sharp point of the Cannabis legalization spear. And especially food, as it implies higher acceptance despite higher risk (see Proximity Pyramid); the way to peoples’ hearts and minds is through their stomachs. Food is primal, comforting, nurturing, and inspires family, connection, and conviviality. Hemp feeds their stomachs as well as their conscience.

Making hemp foods in 1994 gave us the chance to put a big neon-green hemp leaf and the word HEMP on thousands of store shelves in the U.S. and Canada. That in turn generated thousands of newspaper articles and hundreds of radio and TV stories, not in the lifestyle section but in the food and business pages. Legitimizing Cannabis, one bite at a time. Two years later California voters passed Prop 215, the first medical Cannabis law in the country. I don’t think the two are unrelated.

In the late-90s The Tonight Show with Jay Leno did three jokes or skits about me and my hemp foods, and I appeared on The Roseanne Show with Roseanne Barr, Lastly, our hemp foods were on CBS This Morning. Here’s the transcription of all those:


There’s This Pizza Parlor in LA…

From the NBC Studios in Burbank, it’s the Tonight Show with Jay Leno.

Here’s a rather strange story, they’ve come up with a way, you know they’re trying to find all these uses for hemp. You know this is a big thing now, I know you’re very big on it. I can think of one, Jay. Woody Harrelson is into all this. Now they’re making hemp cheese they’re making hemp it’s essentially cheese made out of the byproduct of marijuana. And I’m not making this up, a local pizza parlor here in LA is using that cheese to make hemp pizza. In fact, do we have footage can we show them. Here’s the guy now watch you see how they make it. There’s the hemp cheese. He’s putting it on now. Notice how they make the pizza just a little bit different.

See it at: https://youtu.be/2yfmjpf0zc8


HempRella Cheese: On and On and On…

Well here’s another one of those only in Los Angeles stories. Listen to this. There’s a pizza parlor here in LA that has started offering hemp cheese to its customers. Kevin you know what this is? No, tell me more. A big interest in Italian food. No this is true, the cheese is made out of crushed marijuana seeds. Well you know that’s pretty ingenious. Think about it I mean how rich is this guy who came up with this idea going to be? I mean think about how this works you order a pizza, you eat it then you get the munchies and you got to order another one. It just keeps going on and on and on. It doesn’t stop!

See it at: https://youtu.be/tqjw34pnsck


HempNut Chocolate on National TV with Tommy Chong

You know last week I told you about a company that was making cheese out of hemp which of course is you know marijuana, we were talking about this, Kevin. Well now they’re out again they’re marketing another product called HempNut chocolate bar. It’s like marijuana in a chocolate bar and the research and development people are, actually they came up with this accidentally and they released this video tape of how they invented the product:“Hey you got your chocolate in my stash, man. You got your stash in my chocolate. Wow now you can get high and cure the munchies at the same time!”

See it at: https://youtu.be/f3qub0tv7rg

with Tommy Chong

Roseanne and Richard Make HempNut Potato Salad
for 3 Million

And starting off my show, Richard Rose is going to show us everything we can possibly do with hemp! Okay here to tell us everything we need to know about hemp is Richard Rose so please welcome him. Alright thanks for being on here. Thanks for having me.

So we want you to tell us what is the difference between hemp and marijuana and why is hemp illegal. Well the first one’s easy, the difference is that hemp is the low octane cousin to marijuana. We can’t get high, could smoke an acre of it you won’t get a buzz. It makes great clothes, it makes great food. Now this whole outfit I have on including the shoes the whole is made out of hemp. I’ll come out here. This whole thing it’s made of hemp. So tell us why that’s so damn cool. Look at my shoes. That’s very cool because half of the pesticides and herbicides used in this country we use on the cotton crop so you’ve saved a few pounds of pesticides right off the bat. Hemp is great for paper. It makes a wonderful paper, great for corrugated boxes, writing paper and the like and it saves trees. Our trees and our forests are kind of in danger aren’t they? We only have about 4% of the trees left that we had when this country started. We’re cutting them fast just to make things like toilet paper and writing paper and envelopes for us to throw away in our junk mail.

What’s that going to do up to our total balance of our whole universe. To grow hemp instead of trees? Well in 90 days you could have fiber for making your paper instead of the trees – waiting 20 years for the trees. It’s great for clothes, we can make paper. Popular Science about 50 years ago said there are 25,000 items that can be made from hemp. But wasn’t it big business that kind of drove hemp out of business? It was. We think so. There’s a lot of evidence that DuPont just came out with nylon a few years earlier, no one wanted to buy it. Hemp was its main competitor for sails, for canvases, for fibers for ropes and has been for millennia. One of the first fibers man has used for these things. The word canvas that the masters painted on is from the word cannabis, which hemp is.

And you can make food out of hemp – right that’s what you’re here to show us. I am. We can make food out of the seed, the seed is very nutritious, it’s about… Is this is the seed? It is, this is the dehulled seed. We take the coat off you know that that’s sort of dark colored coat, take that off the inside… Well this is it, it tastes like sunflower and it looks like sesame. Can I try it? It doesn’t taste bad, kinda nutty. And it’s one-third protein and one-third essential fatty acids. This is the most nutritious thing on the shelf today. Wow. Because of the hempseed, it’s a hundred percent hempseed. I just can’t believe that it’s so useful and for like environment, economy you know everything and yet we can’t I just can’t figure that out. Like I said it’s being grown everywhere including Canada. This year our farmers will see the incredible returns that the farmers in Canada are getting from this crop. Well we want our farmers to make money. Yeah well they talked about it, they want to grow it in Kentucky where they’re growing a lot of tobacco now and they want to do it. There’s a Kentucky Hemp Growers Cooperative that has been around about 60 or 70 years and they’re back in business and they want to grow it. Well how come it’s legal to grow tobacco that you know killed about three billion people a day and not hemp, it doesn’t make any sense. It doesn’t, I agree.

Feed me! Feed ya. Tell me what’s good. I’d love to. We have a chocolate… Bite me it says. That’s good. Bite Me bar. That’s the most nutritious chocolate made because of addition of the hempseed. That’s pretty good, we should pass them out. Rice Krispies? Granola bar. Granola bar, that’s really good. Hempseed in it. I like that! We have… What’s this? Those are corn chips. Are those made out of hemp? Corn chips. Made out of hempseed. What’s this stuff? It’s French onion dip. Is this made out of it? Sorry, but it could be, could have been quite easily. What’s that made out of? I don’t wanna eat that. Yeah don’t eat that. But this you could’ve added the hemp oil to. That’s really good. They are good. Really good. What’s that? We have Hempeh Burger, a veggie burger with HempRella our cheese. We make the cheese and the burger veggie burger and the chocolate. That’s good! Veggie burger. Veggie burger. That’s good. What’s this? Potato salad. That’s so good! That’s good! We’re going to make that. And what is this made out of? That’s your basic salad but we added the hempseed salad dressing to it. That is so good! It is good. And it makes you healthy. Makes you healthy. Very healthy. All right! So you can have twice your helpings. You can eat twice as much? Did you hear what he said, he said you can have twice as much of it!

What are you going to make? We’re going to make a potato salad. Is it like that? It’s exactly like that. Well I already ate it. Yeah well… No that’s really good, show us how you made it. First we start with potatoes. You take a half pound of potatoes, white or red potatoes. Okay that’s what’s there, ones red ones white. Throw them in the bowl. First we start with our potatoes, 1/2 pound. Add 1/2 cup of regular yogurt. Oh that’s good yogurt. This could be made from hempseed. You can make yogurt from hempseed? You can take this and turn it into milk like a soymilk. How do you do that? Water and blend it up with water. Oh Really? You can do everything, it’s amazing. And half a cup of green onions. Looks good. This is the HempNut that’s been toasted. You can toast it on a pan, keep it from burning and add some spices if you want but this has just been toasted no spices. The same HempNut and we will pour it in there like so. I like the yogurt thing that’s healthy. Quarter teaspoon to 1/2 teaspoon of garlic salt. You like garlic? Oh yeah. Here you go. Stuck in there though. Uh oh. It’s melted. Here I know how to do it, let me show you. Thank you. And half a teaspoon of oregano, yes oregano not to be confused with hemp. Right. And that’s hempseed oil we will add that, like thus. You want to help? Toss it. Toss it. This was really good. We’re gonna give the audience some of this. Yeah.

This is so good, thank you very much I hope that something positive happens for all of us. Yeah I think it will. Thank you.

See it at: https://youtu.be/PxnJxrWg9ys


Hemp Foods on CBS This Morning

18 after the hour. Fashion trends come and go with styles all over the place from long to short, grunge to glamorous. Well these days one of the hottest fads is clothing made from hemp. Yes it comes from a plant that’s related to the one that produces marijuana. I don’t think that when I’m buying hemp that I’m buying marijuana. I’m looking for the way to marry ecology and economics and looks like this shoe maybe it. The jeans look just like Levi’s and they wear just like Levi so that’s what I like about it. I like comfort. Our store carries probably over 100 products made from hemp, from paper to clothing to bags and accessories wallets and products made out of the hempseed, hempseed oil, hempseed food.

Ken Friedman opened Seattle’s American Hemp Mercantile less than two years ago. Since then sales have skyrocketed past the million-dollar mark. The primary reason we market hemp is for the environmental advantages over the alternatives the synthetic fibers and the cotton. Hemp can be grown with very little fertilizer and no pesticides. So for an industry that has a lot of environmental impact, hemp is a great alternative. While hemp’s become vogue for the ‘90s it’s been used for thousands of years. Van Gogh painted on it and the Declaration of Independence was drafted on it. Hemp was a major cash crop for American farmers until it became illegal to grow in 1937 when the government deemed it too similar to its narcotic-carrying cousin, marijuana. Hemp however is bred differently and contains only traces of the hallucinogenic chemical THC.

I’m witness to the fact that my father had 500 acres of hemp and there wasn’t any crazies running around and people showed up for work regularly and worked all day and they didn’t act foolish. And therefore I can prove you can raise a non-narcotic industrial hemp fiber. Fourth-generation farmer Jacob Graves has joined forces with other Kentucky farmers like Gale Glenn on their state’s hemp fiber task force to push for hemp legalization.

It is becoming a popular fiber. Ralph Lauren is advertising his hemp sheets and Bloomies is selling hemp sneakers and Macy’s is selling Hempeh Burgers. But when you think that all of the hemp products that are sold in this country now are imported from other countries it hardly makes sense. We’re losing the game to foreign competition because our government won’t get off the stick and support the local entrepreneurs. According to the Institute for Hemp the legalization of industrial hemp could mean billions for both retailers and farmers. But the Drug Enforcement Agency which refused to provide a spokesman for this story says it intends to keep the crop illegal. Still importers promised hemp will remain hip.

We’ve been going to fabric shows in New York and other places and showing it to the top designers of the world. We’ve sold hemp to the converse company and Ralph Lauren and Calvin Klein and Land’s End and Levi’s.

It’s the 21st century I think you know. I mean that movie The Graduate that guy said uh “don’t forget the word plastics.” I bet you now it’s “don’t forget the word hemp.” We’ll see. And we’ve got a selection of hemp products here for you to look at, these are the Converse and Adida’s is coming out with a shoe.

Is this all American-made stuff or this is from all over the place. Yeah but the hemp is imported because you can’t grow it here. So it depends on where the company is that makes it whether they’re American or not. Because they grew it all over the place I remember during the war. Cuz then it was used for rope and for uniforms. Yeah. But see part of the criticism is that it is playing toward the young person’s fascination with marijuana. If you look at the button on here there’s a marijuana leaf and so by calling it hemp you know are you trying to legitimize the drug culture. So there are high school kids all of America thinking they can smoke their ties. But it has only a tiny bit of THC, you have a smoke a bale and then you just get a headache. Yeah and also it does have a nutritional value in it so we’ve got a hemp burger and some hemp cheese if you want to try some here. I don’t know if I’ll join you, but… I’ve eaten a cockroach on the show why shouldn’t I eat hemp burger. Oh we’re out of time. Oh gee. Smells delicious.

See it at: https://youtu.be/k5cs39q3cpc

FDA’s CBD Mismanagement Borders on the Criminal

FDA allows drugs Kava-kava and St John’s Wort in foods, and we’ve already had a half-dozen years of massive CBD diffusion, ie: “real world experience.” There are 20,000 unregistered NDIs like CBD, but only CBD raises their ire. But only if crossing state lines. Intrastate/10A FTW.

“Jessica Wasserman, a Washington DC-based cannabis attorney, told Schiller that the FDA is “being a little disingenuous” in regard to the drug preclusion law, saying the companies that have submitted NDIs have invested a great deal of time and money in developing toxicity studies and other research.

She asked why companies would invest in additional research and studies if the FDA is just going to reject them due to the drug preclusion rule.

Shiller countered that the application of a substance that has been approved as a prescription drug as a food additive or dietary supplement has never been done before. He added that the FDA would need significant data first.

“People are pretty well aligned that they don’t want (drugs) in food to be consumed in products that can’t be controlled. This has enough risks. …. Health and safety components have to be worked through.””

Read more: https://hempindustrydaily.com/fda-doubles-down-on-rejecting-over-the-counter-cbd-without-more-study/

PubMed: Cannabis Inflorescence Yield and Cannabinoid Concentration Are Not Increased With Exposure to Short-Wavelength Ultraviolet-B Radiation

PubMed: Cannabis Inflorescence Yield and Cannabinoid Concentration Are Not Increased With Exposure to Short-Wavelength Ultraviolet-B Radiation

Front Plant Sci. 2021 Nov 2;12:725078. doi: 10.3389/fpls.2021.725078. eCollection 2021.

ABSTRACT

Before ultraviolet (UV) radiation can be used as a horticultural management tool in commercial Cannabis sativa (cannabis) production, the effects of UV on cannabis should be vetted scientifically. In this study we investigated the effects of UV exposure level on photosynthesis, growth, inflorescence yield, and secondary metabolite composition of two indoor-grown cannabis cultivars: ‘Low Tide’ (LT) and ‘Breaking Wave’ (BW). After growing vegetatively for 2 weeks under a canopy-level photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) of ≈225 μmol⋅m-2⋅s-1 in an 18-h light/6-h dark photoperiod, plants were grown for 9 weeks in a 12-h light/12-h dark “flowering” photoperiod under a canopy-level PPFD of ≈400 μmol⋅m-2⋅s-1. Supplemental UV radiation was provided daily for 3.5 h at UV photon flux densities ranging from 0.01 to 0.8 μmol⋅m-2⋅s-1 provided by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with a peak wavelength of 287 nm (i.e., biologically-effective UV doses of 0.16 to 13 kJ⋅m-2⋅d-1). The severity of UV-induced morphology (e.g., whole-plant size and leaf size reductions, leaf malformations, and stigma browning) and physiology (e.g., reduced leaf photosynthetic rate and reduced Fv/Fm) symptoms intensified as UV exposure level increased. While the proportion of the total dry inflorescence yield that was derived from apical tissues decreased in both cultivars with increasing UV exposure level, total dry inflorescence yield only decreased in LT. The total equivalent Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) concentrations also decreased in LT inflorescences with increasing UV exposure level. While the total terpene content in inflorescences decreased with increasing UV exposure level in both cultivars, the relative concentrations of individual terpenes varied by cultivar. The present study suggests that using UV radiation as a production tool did not lead to any commercially relevant benefits to cannabis yield or inflorescence secondary metabolite composition.

PMID:34795683 | PMC:PMC8593374 | DOI:10.3389/fpls.2021.725078

#CBD #Hemp https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34795683/?utm_source=Chrome&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1jYCQzi_o_qLYr-oQfnMhShgOXkvGma3vcnBGJtrBhuJMOvEVJ&fc=None&ff=20211120055910&v=2.15.0 November 19, 2021 11:00 am

PubMed: Production of Feminized Seeds of High CBD Cannabis sativa L. by Manipulation of Sex Expression and Its Application to Breeding

PubMed: Production of Feminized Seeds of High CBD Cannabis sativa L. by Manipulation of Sex Expression and Its Application to Breeding

Front Plant Sci. 2021 Nov 1;12:718092. doi: 10.3389/fpls.2021.718092. eCollection 2021.

ABSTRACT

The use of the cannabis plant as a source of therapeutic compounds is gaining great importance since restrictions on its growth and use are gradually reduced throughout the world. Intensification of medical (drug type) cannabis production stimulated breeding activities aimed at developing new, improved cultivars with precisely defined, and stable cannabinoid profiles. The effects of several exogenous substances, known to be involved in sex expressions, such as silver thiosulfate (STS), gibberellic acid (GA), and colloidal silver, were analyzed in this study. Various concentrations were tested within 23 different treatments on two high cannabidiol (CBD) breeding populations. Our results showed that spraying whole plants with STS once is more efficient than the application of STS on shoot tips while spraying plants with 0.01% GA and intensive cutting is ineffective in stimulating the production of male flowers. Additionally, spraying whole plants with colloidal silver was also shown to be effective in the induction of male flowers on female plants, since it produced up to 379 male flowers per plant. The viability and fertility of the induced male flowers were confirmed by fluorescein diacetate (FDA) staining of pollen grains, in vitro and in vivo germination tests of pollen, counting the number of seeds developed after hybridization, and evaluating germination rates of developed seeds. Finally, one established protocol was implemented for crossing selected female plants. The cannabinoid profile of the progeny was compared with the profile of the parental population and an improvement in the biochemical profile of the breeding population was confirmed. The progeny had a higher and more uniform total CBD (tCBD) to total tetrahydrocannabinol (tTHC) ratio (up to 29.6; average 21.33 ± 0.39) compared with the original population (up to 18.8; average 7.83 ± 1.03). This is the first comprehensive report on the induction of fertile male flowers on female plants from dioecious medical cannabis (Cannabis sativa L.).

PMID:34790210 | PMC:PMC8591233 | DOI:10.3389/fpls.2021.718092

#CBD #Hemp https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34790210/?utm_source=Chrome&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1jYCQzi_o_qLYr-oQfnMhShgOXkvGma3vcnBGJtrBhuJMOvEVJ&fc=None&ff=20211119055853&v=2.15.0 November 18, 2021 11:00 am

Pair whose case set CBD free in Europe are officially cleared in France

Pair whose case set CBD free in Europe are officially cleared in France
Pair whose case set CBD free in Europe are officially cleared in France

Two defendants whose cases eventually led to clarification of CBD’s legality in Europe have officially been cleared by a French court. Sébastien Béguerie and Antonin…

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#CBD #Hemp

Pair whose case set CBD free in Europe are officially cleared in France


November 18, 2021 7:27 am

PubMed: Optical and spectroscopic characterization of crystalline structures in cannabis extracts

PubMed: Optical and spectroscopic characterization of crystalline structures in cannabis extracts

J Forensic Sci. 2021 Nov 17. doi: 10.1111/1556-4029.14940. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

Marijuana and hemp represent two broad classes of Cannabis sativa plants that are distinguished based on the concentration of the psychoactive cannabinoid delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9 -THC). In this work, solvent extracts derived from marijuana and hemp were characterized using optical and spectroscopic techniques. The crystalline components of the solvent extracts were first analyzed using polarized light microscopy to determine optical properties, namely, crystal system, optical sign, and principle refractive indices. Crystals from the marijuana-derived extracts exhibited an orthorhombic crystal system and were optically negative, with nβ between 1.6320 and 1.6330 ± 0.0002. In contrast, crystals from hemp-derived extracts exhibited a monoclinic crystal system and were optically positive, with nβ between 1.600 and 1.6040 ± 0.0002. Crystals were further distinguished through infrared spectroscopy, which highlighted structural differences between the two sample types, primarily based on differences in O-H stretching. Finally, single-crystal X-ray diffraction was used to definitively identify the crystalline components, confirming the presence of tetrahydrocannabinolic acid in marijuana-derived extracts and cannabidiol in hemp-derived extracts. Given the differences in crystal structure identified between marijuana-derived and hemp-derived solvent extracts, optical characterization provides a screening method to differentiate visually similar samples prior to confirmatory analysis.

PMID:34787321 | DOI:10.1111/1556-4029.14940

#CBD #Hemp https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34787321/?utm_source=Chrome&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1jYCQzi_o_qLYr-oQfnMhShgOXkvGma3vcnBGJtrBhuJMOvEVJ&fc=None&ff=20211118055912&v=2.15.0 November 17, 2021 11:00 am

EV race car is latest example of hemp’s application to auto industry

EV race car is latest example of hemp’s application to auto industry
EV race car is latest example of hemp’s application to auto industry

An Italian engineering team is experimenting with hemp-based fabric in some car body parts for an experimental race car. Fabric maker Fibertech Group, SRL; Linificio…

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#CBD #Hemp

EV race car is latest example of hemp’s application to auto industry


November 16, 2021 10:28 am

PubMed: The terpenes camphene and alpha-bisabolol inhibit inflammatory and neuropathic pain via Cav3.2 T-type calcium channels

PubMed: The terpenes camphene and alpha-bisabolol inhibit inflammatory and neuropathic pain via Cav3.2 T-type calcium channels

Mol Brain. 2021 Nov 14;14(1):166. doi: 10.1186/s13041-021-00876-6.

ABSTRACT

T-type calcium channels are known molecular targets of certain phytocannabinoids and endocannabinoids. Here we explored the modulation of Cav3.2 T-type calcium channels by terpenes derived from cannabis plants. A screen of eight commercially available terpenes revealed that camphene and alpha-bisabolol mediated partial, but significant inhibition of Cav3.2 channels expressed in tsA-201 cells, as well as native T-type channels in mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons. Both compounds inhibited peak current amplitude with IC50s in the low micromolar range, and mediated an additional small hyperpolarizing shift in half-inactivation voltage. When delivered intrathecally, both terpenes inhibited nocifensive responses in mice that had received an intraplantar injection of formalin, with alpha-bisabolol showing greater efficacy. Both terpenes reduced thermal hyperalgesia in mice injected with Complete Freund’s adjuvant. This effect was independent of sex, and absent in Cav3.2 null mice, indicating that these compounds mediate their analgesic properties by acting on Cav3.2 channels. Both compounds also inhibited mechanical hypersensitivity in a mouse model of neuropathic pain. Hence, camphene and alpha-bisabolol have a wide spectrum of analgesic action by virtue of inhibiting Cav3.2 T-type calcium channels.

PMID:34775970 | DOI:10.1186/s13041-021-00876-6

#CBD #Hemp https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34775970/?utm_source=Chrome&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1jYCQzi_o_qLYr-oQfnMhShgOXkvGma3vcnBGJtrBhuJMOvEVJ&fc=None&ff=20211116055958&v=2.15.0 November 15, 2021 11:00 am

PubMed: Decreasing sperm quality in mice subjected to chronic cannabidiol exposure: New insights of cannabidiol-mediated male reproductive toxicity

PubMed: Decreasing sperm quality in mice subjected to chronic cannabidiol exposure: New insights of cannabidiol-mediated male reproductive toxicity

Chem Biol Interact. 2021 Nov 11:109743. doi: 10.1016/j.cbi.2021.109743. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a natural cannabinoid present in the Cannabis sativa plant, widely prescribed as an anticonvulsant drug, especially for pediatric use. However, its effects on male reproduction are still little investigated. Therefore, the present study assessed the effects of CBD on the spermatogenesis and sperm quality. For this, twenty-one-day-old Swiss mice received CBD for 34 consecutive days by gavage at doses of either 15 or 30 mg/kg. Chronic exposure to CBD decreased the frequency of stages VII-VIII and XII of spermatogenesis and an increase in the frequency of stage IX were noted. Furthermore, the seminiferous epithelium height reduced at stage IX and increased at stage XII in both CBD-treated groups. There was a significant rise of sperm DNA damage, while no genotoxic effects were observed in leukocytes. The activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase decreased, while malondialdehyde levels increased in the sperm of mice treated with a higher dose of CBD. Mice exposed to 30 mg/kg of CBD showed a reduction in the mobile spermatozoa percentage and in curvilinear velocity, while straight line and average path velocity decreased in both treated groups. The number of acrosome-intact spermatozoa declined in the CBD 30 group, and the number of abnormal acrosomes raised in both CBD groups. On the other hand, the weight of reproductive organs, sperm count, and hormone levels were not affected by CBD treatment. These findings show that deregulation of the endocannabinoid system by CBD can reduce sperm quality. The mechanisms responsible may be associated with disorders during spermatogenesis, especially during the final stages of nuclear remodeling and assembly of acrosome. However, changes in mitochondrial function, as well as the reduction on the antioxidant enzyme activities during epididymal transit, at least partly, may also be involved.

PMID:34774840 | DOI:10.1016/j.cbi.2021.109743

#CBD #Hemp https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34774840/?utm_source=Chrome&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1jYCQzi_o_qLYr-oQfnMhShgOXkvGma3vcnBGJtrBhuJMOvEVJ&fc=None&ff=20211115055922&v=2.15.0 November 14, 2021 11:00 am

PubMed: Decreasing sperm quality in mice subjected to chronic cannabidiol exposure: New insights of cannabidiol-mediated male reproductive toxicity

PubMed: Decreasing sperm quality in mice subjected to chronic cannabidiol exposure: New insights of cannabidiol-mediated male reproductive toxicity

Chem Biol Interact. 2021 Nov 11:109743. doi: 10.1016/j.cbi.2021.109743. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a natural cannabinoid present in the Cannabis sativa plant, widely prescribed as an anticonvulsant drug, especially for pediatric use. However, its effects on male reproduction are still little investigated. Therefore, the present study assessed the effects of CBD on the spermatogenesis and sperm quality. For this, twenty-one-day-old Swiss mice received CBD for 34 consecutive days by gavage at doses of either 15 or 30 mg/kg. Chronic exposure to CBD decreased the frequency of stages VII-VIII and XII of spermatogenesis and an increase in the frequency of stage IX were noted. Furthermore, the seminiferous epithelium height reduced at stage IX and increased at stage XII in both CBD-treated groups. There was a significant rise of sperm DNA damage, while no genotoxic effects were observed in leukocytes. The activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase decreased, while malondialdehyde levels increased in the sperm of mice treated with a higher dose of CBD. Mice exposed to 30 mg/kg of CBD showed a reduction in the mobile spermatozoa percentage and in curvilinear velocity, while straight line and average path velocity decreased in both treated groups. The number of acrosome-intact spermatozoa declined in the CBD 30 group, and the number of abnormal acrosomes raised in both CBD groups. On the other hand, the weight of reproductive organs, sperm count, and hormone levels were not affected by CBD treatment. These findings show that deregulation of the endocannabinoid system by CBD can reduce sperm quality. The mechanisms responsible may be associated with disorders during spermatogenesis, especially during the final stages of nuclear remodeling and assembly of acrosome. However, changes in mitochondrial function, as well as the reduction on the antioxidant enzyme activities during epididymal transit, at least partly, may also be involved.

PMID:34774840 | DOI:10.1016/j.cbi.2021.109743

#CBD #Hemp https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34774840/?utm_source=Chrome&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1jYCQzi_o_qLYr-oQfnMhShgOXkvGma3vcnBGJtrBhuJMOvEVJ&fc=None&ff=20211115055922&v=2.15.0 November 14, 2021 11:00 am

PubMed: Cannabinoids-Characteristics and Potential for Use in Food Production

PubMed: Cannabinoids-Characteristics and Potential for Use in Food Production

Molecules. 2021 Nov 6;26(21):6723. doi: 10.3390/molecules26216723.

ABSTRACT

Scientific demonstrations of the beneficial effects of non-psychoactive cannabinoids on the human body have increased the interest in foods containing hemp components. This review systematizes the latest discoveries relating to the characteristics of cannabinoids from Cannabis sativa L. var. sativa, it also presents a characterization of the mentioned plant. In this review, we present data on the opportunities and limitations of cannabinoids in food production. This article systematizes the data on the legal aspects, mainly the limits of Δ9-THC in food, the most popular analytical techniques (LC-MS and GC-MS) applied to assay cannabinoids in finished products, and the available data on the stability of cannabinoids during heating, storage, and access to light and oxygen. This may constitute a major challenge to their common use in food processing, as well as the potential formation of undesirable degradation products. Hemp-containing foods have great potential to become commercially popular among functional foods, provided that our understanding of cannabinoid stability in different food matrices and cannabinoid interactions with particular food ingredients are expanded. There remains a need for more data on the effects of technological processes and storage on cannabinoid degradation.

PMID:34771132 | DOI:10.3390/molecules26216723

#CBD #Hemp https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34771132/?utm_source=Chrome&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1jYCQzi_o_qLYr-oQfnMhShgOXkvGma3vcnBGJtrBhuJMOvEVJ&fc=None&ff=20211114055837&v=2.15.0 November 13, 2021 11:00 am

PubMed: Cannabinoids-Characteristics and Potential for Use in Food Production

PubMed: Cannabinoids-Characteristics and Potential for Use in Food Production

Molecules. 2021 Nov 6;26(21):6723. doi: 10.3390/molecules26216723.

ABSTRACT

Scientific demonstrations of the beneficial effects of non-psychoactive cannabinoids on the human body have increased the interest in foods containing hemp components. This review systematizes the latest discoveries relating to the characteristics of cannabinoids from Cannabis sativa L. var. sativa, it also presents a characterization of the mentioned plant. In this review, we present data on the opportunities and limitations of cannabinoids in food production. This article systematizes the data on the legal aspects, mainly the limits of Δ9-THC in food, the most popular analytical techniques (LC-MS and GC-MS) applied to assay cannabinoids in finished products, and the available data on the stability of cannabinoids during heating, storage, and access to light and oxygen. This may constitute a major challenge to their common use in food processing, as well as the potential formation of undesirable degradation products. Hemp-containing foods have great potential to become commercially popular among functional foods, provided that our understanding of cannabinoid stability in different food matrices and cannabinoid interactions with particular food ingredients are expanded. There remains a need for more data on the effects of technological processes and storage on cannabinoid degradation.

PMID:34771132 | DOI:10.3390/molecules26216723

#CBD #Hemp https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34771132/?utm_source=Chrome&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1jYCQzi_o_qLYr-oQfnMhShgOXkvGma3vcnBGJtrBhuJMOvEVJ&fc=None&ff=20211114055837&v=2.15.0 November 13, 2021 11:00 am

New harvester yields hemp fiber suitable for flax processing lines

New harvester yields hemp fiber suitable for flax processing lines
New harvester yields hemp fiber suitable for flax processing lines

Belgian custom equipment maker Hyler BV has introduced a new hemp harvester that gives flax farmers an additional crop option while signaling the rebirth of…

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#CBD #Hemp

New harvester yields hemp fiber suitable for flax processing lines


November 12, 2021 1:30 pm

PubMed: Cannabidiol Does Not Impact Acute Anabolic or Inflammatory Signaling in Skeletal Muscle <em>In Vitro</em>

PubMed: Cannabidiol Does Not Impact Acute Anabolic or Inflammatory Signaling in Skeletal Muscle <em>In Vitro</em>

Cannabis Cannabinoid Res. 2021 Nov 11. doi: 10.1089/can.2021.0132. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

Background: Cannabidiol (CBD) is becoming increasingly popular for the treatment of clinical conditions including as an aid for muscle recovery. Previous work demonstrated that CBD exhibited mild effects on skeletal muscle, with a tendency to increase anabolic signaling and decrease inflammatory signaling. Methods: To gain mechanistic insight and extend these findings, we conducted a set of experiments using C2C12 myotubes. Results: Increasing the dose of CBD (1-5 μM) provided with insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) showed no effect on anabolic signaling through mTORC1 (S6K1 [Thr389], p=0.27; rpS6 [Ser240/244], p=0.81; or 4E-BP1 [Thr37/46], p=0.87). Similarly, inflammatory signaling through nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) (p105, p=0.88; p50, p=0.93; or phosphorylated p65 [Ser536], p=0.84) in response to tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) was unaffected by CBD (2.5 μM), whereas dioscin, a natural product that blocks NF-κB signaling, reduced p105 and phosphorylated p65 (Ser536) compared with the TNFα and the TNFα + CBD condition (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively). Finally, cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) receptor levels were measured in C2C12 cells, murine skeletal muscle, cortex, and hippocampus. Although CB1 was not detectable in muscle cells or muscle tissue, high levels were observed in brain tissue. Conclusion: In conclusion, CBD does not directly modulate anabolic or inflammatory signaling in myotubes in vitro, which can likely be explained by the lack of functional receptors.

PMID:34762497 | DOI:10.1089/can.2021.0132

#CBD #Hemp https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34762497/?utm_source=Chrome&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1jYCQzi_o_qLYr-oQfnMhShgOXkvGma3vcnBGJtrBhuJMOvEVJ&fc=None&ff=20211112055910&v=2.15.0 November 11, 2021 11:00 am

Hemp probed to clean land in South Africa’s toxic gold mining areas

Hemp probed to clean land in South Africa’s toxic gold mining areas
Hemp probed to clean land in South Africa’s toxic gold mining areas

A South African researcher is looking into the potential of hemp farming to clean the soil in abandoned, highly-polluted former gold mining areas, and how…

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#CBD #Hemp

Hemp probed to clean land in South Africa’s toxic gold mining areas


November 11, 2021 10:05 am

What FDA’s Data Acceleration Plan May Signal for the Future of Hemp-Derived Cannabinoids

What FDA’s Data Acceleration Plan May Signal for the Future of Hemp-Derived Cannabinoids

hemp cultivation 2025

By Eric Singular, Director, Hemp Business Journal

Last month, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released its Cannabis-Derived Products Data Acceleration Plan (DAP) offering a glimpse into how the federal agency will pursue data acquisition as it lumbers toward crafting a rule for the manufacture and retail of products containing hemp-derived cannabinoids. The DAP aims to leverage “novel” data sources to assess the safety and efficacy of cannabis-derived products (CDPs), as well as forge government data partnerships and advance scientific research to evaluate consumer vulnerabilities.

One of the pilot initiatives that the FDA will employ to mine novel data sources is social listening. Originally a marketing strategy designed to help brands track and monitor data from social media platforms, social listening will allow the agency to assess volumes of words, phrases, and keywords to analyze demographics, market contextualization, and consumer behaviors to identify current and emerging safety vulnerabilities in the market. The DAP cites platforms like Reddit and Twitter to foster deeper understanding of public health issues surrounding the use of CDPs.

As New Frontier Data’s Senior Industry Analyst Josh Adams pointed out, “the social listening approach to data collection – using platforms such as Reddit, Twitter, and Instagram as part of their novel data sources approach – certainly makes sense for gaining an understanding of consumer behavior and experiences, and will probably yield some interesting qualitative insights. However, this is not the type of rigorous scientific testing we generally expect from the FDA, and is unlikely to assist the agency in making determinations about the overall safety of cannabis and cannabis-derived products.”

During a virtual conference on cannabis and cannabidiol hosted by the Food and Drug Law Institute, Joseph Franklin, a former policy director for the FDA’s Principal Deputy Chief Amy Abernethy, asserted that the FDA’s call for more data sounds like a broken record, and that the agency needs to become more active in working with stakeholders to craft regulations and guide the hemp-derived cannabinoid sector forward. There appears to be growing friction between the FDA and industry manufacturers of CBD and other minor cannabinoids.

On July 13 the FDA reconfirmed its position that CBD in any form is subject to the drug preclusion language in the federal Food Drug and Cosmetic Act, per objection letters posted regarding New Dietary Ingredient Notifications (NDIN) filed by Charlotte’s Web and Irwin Naturals in citing a lack of clinical research. While it is typical for big food and big pharma to fund the necessary clinical research to get new food, drug, or nutraceutical ingredients through the FDA approval process, CBD companies are not generating anywhere near the kind of revenue to be able to afford funding clinical research trials.

Next month marks three years since passage of the 2018 Farm Bill, and the industry remains without a clear regulatory framework from the FDA. Less than a year after the bill was signed into law, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) published its Interim Final Rule for Domestic Hemp Production. After multiple public comment periods, a Final Rule was codified last January, taking effect on March 22 The expeditious timeline for crafting regulation was only made possible by the agency’s leveraging knowledge and insights from regulators from state departments of agriculture (e.g., Colorado, Kentucky, and Oregon) which had been experienced in the cultivation of hemp during 2014-2018.

In the past three years, the FDA has sent dozens of warning letters to manufacturers of CBD products for making illegal marketing claims related to the treatment of medical conditions. The rebukes from the agency seem less about curbing brands from employing dubious marketing tactics than about highlighting the absence of regulations from FDA. An uncertain sense of pioneering in the Wild West may seem endemic until the agency promulgates formal regulations.

“In part,” Adams suggests, “I think FDA inaction stems from the fact that there hasn’t really been anything to compel the agency to be particularly proactive. With federal legalization becoming increasingly likely in the not-too-distant future, the agency will be forced into action to address not just CBD but a range of other cannabis-derived products. The Cannabis Administration & Opportunity Act outlined a fairly extensive, if vaguely defined, role for the FDA in the context of a federally legal cannabis marketplace. While that legislation is unlikely to gain much traction before the midterm elections, it certainly signaled to the agency the extent of the role it would have relative to regulating cannabis and cannabis-derived products. Minimally, this data acceleration plan suggests that the FDA is aware of its deficits in understanding cannabis, and represents an initial step in understanding the space.”

The expectation that the industry will regulate itself or provide the funds for clinical research would be a tall order, but given that retail sales of CBD-infused foods, beverages, and supplements saw a sharp decline from June 2020 to June 2021, it seems more likely that brands will prioritize survival, even should that range into regulatory gray areas.

According to the wellness-focused data technology firm SPINS, sales of CBD supplements fell 6% in 2020, and sales of CBD beverages fell 11% from April 2020 to 2021. In May, GT’s Living Foods (a market leader for kombucha) scrapped its plans to release a CBD-infused beverage line, citing regulatory uncertainty.

Continued expectations for federal marijuana policy change may buoy the sector before next year’s midterm elections, though the results there, too, remain uncertain.

As Adams elaborated, “the impact of the midterm elections is a bit of an unknown at this point. The conventional wisdom is that the party in power typically loses some seats in Congress during the midterms. This, coupled with other big-ticket items – infrastructure, the ongoing pandemic, an unstable economy, global supply chain issues – will likely keep federal legalization out of the spotlight in the near term.

Nevertheless, the cannabis industry added an estimated 80,000 jobs in 2020, and as of 2021 cannabis represented the fifth-most valuable crop in the U.S. If the industry can continue to press these issues and situate cannabis as integral to the American economy, then perhaps legalization can build upon this momentum going into the 2022 election cycle.”

Either way, the DAP signals that a robust regulatory framework remains a long way out. Meanwhile, states are leading the charge, with New York and California both passing laws to regulate CBD sales, actions which the FDA discourages. The collaborative spirit shared between regulators, industry operators, and federal officials to enable the USDA to produce an imperfect but practical Final Rule for hemp production seems lacking at FDA. If the agency’s call for more data is a tired refrain, so is the dearth of regulations’ precluding progress for producers of hemp-derived CBD and minor cannabinoids. For now, the bands play on.

The post What FDA’s Data Acceleration Plan May Signal for the Future of Hemp-Derived Cannabinoids appeared first on New Frontier Data.

#CBD #Hemp https://newfrontierdata.com/cannabis-insights/what-fdas-data-acceleration-plan-may-signal-for-the-future-of-hemp-derived-cannabinoids/ November 10, 2021 11:59 pm

PubMed: Similarities and differences upon binditng of naturally occurring Δ<sup>9</sup>-tetrahydrocannabinol-derivatives to cannabinoid CB<sub>1</sub> and CB<sub>2</sub> receptors

PubMed: Similarities and differences upon binditng of naturally occurring Δ<sup>9</sup>-tetrahydrocannabinol-derivatives to cannabinoid CB<sub>1</sub> and CB<sub>2</sub> receptors

Pharmacol Res. 2021 Nov 7:105970. doi: 10.1016/j.phrs.2021.105970. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

We have here assessed, using D9-tetrahydrocannabinol (D9-THC) for comparison, the, effect of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (D9-THCA) and of Δ9- Δ9-, tetrahydrocannabivarin (D9-THCV) that is mediated by human versions of CB1, CB2, and CB1-CB2 receptor functional units, expressed in a heterologous system. Binding, to the CB1 and CB2 receptors was addressed in living cells by means of a, homogeneous assay. A biphasic competition curve for the binding to the CB2 receptor, was obtained for D9-THCV in cells expressing the two receptors. Signaling studies, included cAMP level determination, activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase, pathway and ß-arrestin recruitment. The signaling of D9-THCA and D9-THCV via, individual receptors or receptor heteromers disclosed differential bias, i.e. the bias for, a given phytocannabinoid depended on the receptor (CB1, CB2 or CB1-CB2) and on, the compound used as reference to calculate the bias factor (D9-THC, a selective, agonist or a non-selective agonist). These results are consistent with different binding, modes leading to differential functional selectivity depending on the agonist structure, and the state (monomeric or heteromeric) of the cannabinoid receptor. In addition, on, studying Gi-coupling, we showed that D9-THCV and D9-THCA were able to revert the, effect of a selective CB2 receptor agonist, but only D9-THCV, and not D9-THCA, reverted the effect of arachidonyl-2′-chloroethylamide (ACEA, 100nM) a selective, agonist of the CB1 receptor. Overall, these results indicate that cannabinoids may have, a variety of binding modes that results in qualitatively different effects depending on the, signaling pathway engaged upon cannabinoid receptor activation.

PMID:34758399 | DOI:10.1016/j.phrs.2021.105970

#CBD #Hemp https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34758399/?utm_source=Chrome&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1jYCQzi_o_qLYr-oQfnMhShgOXkvGma3vcnBGJtrBhuJMOvEVJ&fc=None&ff=20211111055853&v=2.15.0 November 10, 2021 11:00 am

Rhythm CBD Seltzers Launches Rhythm Sport

Rhythm CBD Seltzers Launches Rhythm Sport

Rhythm CBD Seltzers has launched Rhythm Sport, a lightly sparkling beverage infused with 15 mg of broad-spectrum hemp extract, an electrolyte blend with B vitamins, and natural strawberry and hibiscus flavors.

#CBD #Hemp https://www.preparedfoods.com/articles/126212-rhythm-cbd-seltzers-launches-rhythm-sport November 8, 2021 3:22 pm

PubMed: Cannabis: gyogyszer, elelmiszer vagy kabitoszer?

PubMed: Cannabis: gyogyszer, elelmiszer vagy kabitoszer?

Orv Hetil. 2021 Nov 7;162(45):1808-1817. doi: 10.1556/650.2021.32211.

ABSTRACT

Összefoglaló. A kender (Cannabis sativa) gyógyhatásainak megítélése napjainkban változóban van, egyúttal igen ellentmondásos. Munkánk célja a kenderrel és készítményeivel kapcsolatos jogszabályi környezet alakulásának a kender gyógyászati alkalmazásának történetével párhuzamos bemutatása. A kenderrel és tartalomanyagaival kapcsolatos, jelenleg hatályos hazai jogszabályok és nemzetközi egyezmények áttekintése mellett bemutatjuk a kender alkalmazásának történetét a szakirodalmi adatok és a gyógyszerkincs átalakulásának tükrében. A kender ipari pályafutása textilipari alapanyagként kezdődött, de már ezt megelőzően is alkalmazták kábítószerként és gyógyászati célokra. A 20. század során a pszichoaktív szerként való felhasználás vált elterjedtebbé, de a növény hatóanyagainak jobb megismerésével a gyógyászati alkalmazás súlya is nőtt. Jelenleg a kender több vegyülete (kannabidiol, tetrahidrokannabinol) van forgalomban gyógyszerként világszerte, de félszintetikus kannabinoidot (nabilon) tartalmazó készítmények és különböző kannabisztermékek is forgalomban vannak gyógyszerként. Napjainkban alkalmazására jellemző, hogy a racionális gyógyászati használat mellett jelentős a túlzó elvárásokon alapuló, szakszerűtlen alkalmazás. Ez részben a kenderrel kapcsolatos jogi szabályozás anomáliáival is magyarázható. Ennek következménye, hogy élelmiszerként elérhetők a kender epilepsziaellenes hatóanyagát tartalmazó termékek, amelyeket számos gyógyhatás reményében használnak orvosi kontroll nélkül. Megállapítható, hogy az új tudományos eredmények, a területen érdekelt vállalkozások céljai, a fogyasztói igények, a piaci realitás és a jogi szabályozás nem minden esetben és szempontból van összhangban. A kannabinoidok hosszabb távú jövőjét a bizonyítékokon alapuló gyógyászatban nagyban befolyásolják azok a kutatások, amelyek segítségével pontosabb kép alkotható haszon-kockázat profiljukról. Orv Hetil. 2021; 162(45): 1808-1817. Summary. The opinion about the medicinal value of cannabis (Cannabis sativa) is changing but still remains controversial. The aim of our work was to present the evolution of the regulatory environment of Cannabis and its preparations in parallel with its history as medicine. We reviewed the current national legislation and international conventions on Cannabis and its constituents along with the historical and contemporary medicinal application of Cannabis. The utilisation of Cannabis started in the textile industry, but it was applied for recreational and medicinal purposes beforehand. During the 20th century, it was best known for its psychoactivity whereas its medicinal importance increased after elucidating the bioactivities of the active compounds of the plant. Currently different phytocannabinoids (cannabidiol, tetrahydrocannabinol) are marketed as medicines, but semisynthetic cannabinoids and different cannabis-based products are also approved as medicines. Today, there is a trend that goes beyond the rational and medicinal application thus results in improper form of utilisation. This phenomenon could partly be explained by the anomalies of legislative regulations. As a result, products containing the antiepileptic component of cannabis are available as food and used for different medicinal purposes without medical supervision. Evidently, there is no harmony between the new scientific discoveries, the goals of companies involved, the demands of consumers, market realities and current laws in several aspects. Ongoing studies will help to clarify the benefit-risk profiles of cannabinoids and provide major influence on the future of these compounds in the evidence-based medicine. Orv Hetil. 2021; 162(45): 1808-1817.

PMID:34747360 | DOI:10.1556/650.2021.32211

#CBD #Hemp https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34747360/?utm_source=Chrome&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1jYCQzi_o_qLYr-oQfnMhShgOXkvGma3vcnBGJtrBhuJMOvEVJ&fc=None&ff=20211109055842&v=2.15.0 November 8, 2021 11:00 am

PubMed: Cannabidiol selectively modulates interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 production in toll-like receptor activated human peripheral blood monocytes

PubMed: Cannabidiol selectively modulates interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 production in toll-like receptor activated human peripheral blood monocytes

Toxicology. 2021 Nov 2:153016. doi: 10.1016/j.tox.2021.153016. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a major non-euphoric cannabis-derived compound that has become popular in its over-the-counter utilization. CBD possesses low affinity for cannabinoid receptors, while the primary molecular target(s) by which CBD mediates biological activity remain poorly defined. Individuals commonly self-medicate using CBD products with little knowledge of its specific immunopharmacological effects on the human immune system; however, research has established primarily in rodent models that CBD possesses immune modulating properties. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether CBD modulates the innate immune response by human primary monocytes activated through toll-like receptors (TLR) 1-9. Monocytes were activated through each TLR and treated with CBD (0.5-10µM) for 22 hours. Monocyte secretion profiles for 13 immune mediators were quantified including: IL-4, IL-2, IP-10, IL-1β, TNFα, MCP-1, IL-17a, IL-6, IL-10, IFNγ, IL-12p70, IL-8, and TGF-β1. CBD treatment significantly suppressed secretion of proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β by monocytes activated through most TLRs, apart from TLRs 3 and 8. Additionally, CBD treatment induced significant modulation of IL-6 production by monocytes activated through most TLRs, except for TLRs 1 and 3. Most other monocyte-derived factors assayed were refractory to CBD modulation. Overall, CBD selectively altered monocyte-derived IL-1β and IL-6 when activated through most TLRs. This study is of particular importance as it provides a direct and comprehensive assessment of the effects of CBD on TLR-activated primary human monocytes at a time when CBD containing products are being widely used by the public.

PMID:34740670 | DOI:10.1016/j.tox.2021.153016

#CBD #Hemp https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34740670/?utm_source=Chrome&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1jYCQzi_o_qLYr-oQfnMhShgOXkvGma3vcnBGJtrBhuJMOvEVJ&fc=None&ff=20211107055852&v=2.15.0 November 6, 2021 10:00 am

The USDA & Controlled Environment Agriculture: A Q&A with Derek Smith, Executive Director of the RII

The USDA & Controlled Environment Agriculture: A Q&A with Derek Smith, Executive Director of the RII

Controlled environment agriculture (CEA) is a hot area of investment right now for the USDA, holding the promise of improved efficiencies and productivity for indoor growing operations. The cannabis industry, long accustomed to indoor growing has emerged as a spearhead in CEA innovation.

The Resource Innovation Institute has been supporting cannabis enterprises as a non-profit entity since 2016, providing a benchmarking platform called Power Score to help cannabis cultivators be more efficient with resources in their growing practices. Recently, RII submitted a proposal to the USDA to bring best practices from the cannabis industry to other CEA crop producers. They have also recently been responding to the Cannabis Administration and Opportunity Act, providing comments to frame an energy and environmental policy framework for future federal regulation.

We interviewed Derek Smith, executive director of Resource Innovation Institute (RII).  Derek engages RII’s advisory bodies, including the Strategic Advisory Council and Technical Advisory Council Leadership Committees and develops global partnerships and oversees the organization’s policy work. Prior to RII, Derek was CEO of Clean Energy Works and policy advisor to the City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability.

Aaron Green: What are RII’s plans for the USDA? I understand you’ve also been working on the CAOA recently?

Derek Smith: We’ve been working in cannabis for five years, publishing best practices and capturing data to inform governments and utilities on how much energy is being used. Our mission is to help producers become more efficient in their use of resources. In addition to informing policies that support producers, we also engage utilities to help them evaluate efficient technologies, so they can put incentives on them and so they can help buy down the cost for cannabis producers to install more efficient technologies.

We submitted a proposal to the USDA, saying we’ve been doing all that in cannabis. This was under the banner of a Conservation Innovation Grant, which is an innovation funding mechanism from the USDA. They specifically wanted something related to indoor agriculture and energy and water efficiency. So, we essentially said, we’ll give you a three-year project that will basically be the blueprint for the controlled environment agriculture (CEA) industry to transform itself toward a more sustainable production path. This applies to both the urban vertical farms growing leafy greens, as well as the growing greenhouse sector that is producing a range of crops, from tomatoes, to berries, to leafy greens to mushrooms, hemp, etc.

We’re essentially taking the Power Score benchmarking platform that we’ve been serving cannabis producers with to help them understand how competitive they are relative to the rest of the data set that we have on energy use and on water use and opening that platform so that more producers of other types of crops can use it. It also feeds into their Environment, Social & Governance (ESG) reporting needs.

We’re going to write a series of best practices guidance for CEA producers, covering a number of topics: facility design and construction, lighting, HVAC, irrigation and water reuse, controls and automation. This will all be very similar to what we’ve done in cannabis. These best practices guides are peer reviewed by subject matter experts throughout the supply chain. A lot of the supply chain in cannabis is the same in CEA. So, we’re bringing them all together to give this kind of good guidance to the producer community.

Green: You started with cannabis and created these white papers. Now you’re branching out into the larger CEA space?

Smith: Exactly. The federal government is literally funding us to develop a green building rating system like LEED, or like the Living Building Challenge, but for the CEA industry for indoor agriculture. The cannabis industry can leverage this federal investment and basically ride right alongside of it so that we can create a “LEED for weed” type of certification system.

Derek Smith, Executive Director of Resource Innovation Institute

That’s one of the main features in our comments to the CAOA when they asked, “what else should we be thinking about on any number of topics as it relates to federal cannabis regulations?” We proposed an energy and environment policy framework for federal cannabis regulation. We did that in partnership with a group called the Coalition for Cannabis Policy Education and Regulation (CPEAR). We just held a webinar two weeks ago. Hawthorne Gardening Company was featured on there as well. They’re very supportive of the federal government playing a “carrots rather than sticks” role as it relates to cannabis energy and environmental policy issues.

That’s essentially our platform at the federal level. The stuff that the USDA is funding us to do will come back and benefit the cannabis industry, because we’ll have this broader set of best practices guidance, data, etc. And then we’ll be able to leverage the federal investment into a certification system for the cannabis industry.

Green: The specific comments you made to the CAOA were primarily related to this energy efficiency certification system work you’ve been doing?

Smith: Yes. It’s more resource efficiency – it’s broader than just energy efficiency. Well, it was three things. So, I’ll just unpack this quickly. One, is learn from the states that have already initiated some form of regulation or support on helping producers be more efficient. Massachusetts is one example. They put lighting requirements on the industry that don’t explicitly mandate LEDs, but it comes close to that. California passed an energy code that will take effect on January 1 of 2023, that also has lighting requirements.

Green: Is this applied to all greenhouse growers?

Smith: Yes, at a certain size and level of energy usage. In California, it’s the first market where their Title 24 regulations apply not just to cannabis, but to all horticultural operations. Yes. So that’s what we’re seeing is that cannabis is sort of the tip of the spear for the way governments are thinking about policy for indoor agriculture more broadly. We’re trying to get them to focus more on having the federal government play a supportive role. The states are doing the regulation, the federal government can be more focused on carrots, not sticks, right?

So, back to the list of three things. Number one is learn from the states. Don’t add regulatory stuff, just learn what’s going on, and then decide about how to act. Number two is recognizing the need for data. So, supporting state requirements on energy and water reporting like Massachusetts, Illinois, California – a lot of states have either enacted reporting requirements, so the producers must tell the state how much energy and water they’re using and they’re using the Power Score benchmarking platform, which has a compliance function for free to do that reporting. Then what we’re doing is helping everybody understand what the aggregate data is telling us. We protect the producer’s confidentiality, and we’re building this valuable data set that’ll inform the market about what is the most efficient path going forward.

Then the third thing is focused on carrots, not sticks. For example, support the development of a certification system that recognizes leadership, that’s based on a market driven voluntary action by a producer where they say, “I’ll be transparent with my data, because I’d like to be showcased as a leader and get recognition for the good work I’ve done to create an efficient operation.” Then there’s valuation through the real estate transaction as well because you even have a plaque on your building that says this is certified to this agricultural standard.

That’s all the vision that we’re laying out, and we’re looking for partnerships at the MSO level to join in and be recognized and get in the queue as leaders for the investments they’ve made in efficiency.

Green: Great, thank you Derek. That concludes the interview.

Smith: Thanks, Aaron.

The post The USDA & Controlled Environment Agriculture: A Q&A with Derek Smith, Executive Director of the RII appeared first on Cannabis Industry Journal.


#CBD #Hemp

The USDA & Controlled Environment Agriculture: A Q&A with Derek Smith, Executive Director of the RII


November 5, 2021 7:54 pm

Italian study flags pesticides, metals in smokable ‘Cannabis light’ flowers

Italian study flags pesticides, metals in smokable ‘Cannabis light’ flowers
Italian study flags pesticides, metals in smokable ‘Cannabis light’ flowers

Researchers in Italy have detected the presence of 154 pesticides and a number of heavy metals in samples of domestically grown hemp flowers, a worrying prospect for…

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#CBD #Hemp

Italian study flags pesticides, metals in smokable ‘Cannabis light’ flowers


November 5, 2021 10:02 am

PubMed: Analytical and medico-legal problems linked to the presence of delta-8-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-8-THC) – results from urine drug testing in Sweden

PubMed: Analytical and medico-legal problems linked to the presence of delta-8-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-8-THC) – results from urine drug testing in Sweden

Drug Test Anal. 2021 Nov 3. doi: 10.1002/dta.3190. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

During routine urine drug testing for cannabis use targeting delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid (delta-9-THC-COOH) at the Karolinska University Laboratory in Sweden, an unknown interfering peak was observed in the liquid-chromatographic-tandem mass-spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) confirmative analysis. The peak showed the same exact mass and most abundant fragments as delta-9-THC-COOH but a slightly shorter retention time, thereby not fulfilling all requirements for a positive identification. The analytical results suggested that it was a similar compound, and with access to reference material it could be identified as the double bond isomer delta-8-THC-COOH. Delta-8-THC has recently become popular as a recreational drug, although its legality varies and is sometimes unclear. In Sweden, all THC isomers are classified substances. The slight difference in retention times was sufficient to distinguish the THC-COOH isomers in the routine LC-MS/MS method, but another LC method allowed better peak separation and individual quantification. At the Karolinska University Laboratory, delta-8-THC-COOH was first observed in April 2020, and the highest incidence was noted in June 2020 when it was present in 5.3% of all THC-COOH positive samples. The incidence later decreased to today only occasional findings. Large differences in the relative presence of the isomers in the urine samples indicated different origin, for example synthetically produced pure delta-8-THC, or mixtures of both THC isomers formed during combustion of cannabidiol (CBD). In conclusion, the appearance of delta-8-THC and other isomers on the recreational drug market risk causing analytical and medico-legal problems, due to confusion with delta-9-THC.

PMID:34734479 | DOI:10.1002/dta.3190

#CBD #Hemp https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34734479/?utm_source=Chrome&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1jYCQzi_o_qLYr-oQfnMhShgOXkvGma3vcnBGJtrBhuJMOvEVJ&fc=None&ff=20211105065845&v=2.15.0 November 4, 2021 10:00 am

Germany’s ‘traffic light coalition’ could signal ‘sustainable industrial revolution’

Germany’s ‘traffic light coalition’ could signal ‘sustainable industrial revolution’
Germany’s ‘traffic light coalition’ could signal ‘sustainable industrial revolution’

Germany’s Federal Association for Sustainability (BVNG) has called for a “sustainable industrial evolution” that fully exploits hemp, and is urging agreement among parties now forming…

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#CBD #Hemp

Germany’s ‘traffic light coalition’ could signal ‘sustainable industrial revolution’


November 4, 2021 8:44 am

Business Is Good with Wellness Getting Better Among European Cannabis Consumers

Business Is Good with Wellness Getting Better Among European Cannabis Consumers

U.S. consumers cannabis

By Oliver Bennett, Special Contributor to New Frontier Data

Perhaps the two most discussed pillars of the cannabis sector today are those in the medical and recreational sectors. It is a point made in the New Frontier Data’s new report, Cannabis & Wellness: A New Consumer Paradigm, which among other things points out that in the “last several decades, cannabis consumption has been classified into a binary of medical or recreational use”.

Yet, as the report also points out, a vast part of the cannabis consumer landscape lies somewhere in between those poles, most notably in the category known as “wellness”, where cannabis and CBD are used for lifestyle reasons rather than curative or intoxicating purposes. As the report details, consumer research has now challenged those earlier binary assumptions, finding that more than half (51%) of consumers report using cannabis for both medical and recreational reasons, and that about one-quarter (23%) of current consumers – skewing towards younger consumers – named the improvement of overall health and wellness as a key reason for using cannabis.

The wellness arena will have significant repercussions on the cannabis industry, says the report’s author, Dr. Molly McCann (Ed.D.), New Frontier Data’s Director of Industry Analytics. “We separate cannabis into ‘medical’ versus ‘recreational’ for legal reasons,” says McCann. “But a lot of the people who self-describe as recreational consumers are using it for wellness, whether it’s to relieve stress, relax, or for exercise.”

McCann explained that “cannabis affects so many different systems of the body that everyone can integrate it into their lives in ways that promotes their wellbeing. As cannabis becomes less stigmatised and more mainstream, it will be a useful exercise to see how these different uses are communicated to new consumers.”

CBD, for instance, serves an increasing amount of people as an entry point to cannabis use. As well as being an established ingredient in the beauty, self-care, and nutraceutical sectors, CBD is becoming a fixture in the leisure and hospitality industries. Recently, a spa claiming to be Europe’s first CBD Spa opened in the upmarket SchlossHotel Zermatt ski resort in Switzerland, using Swiss CBD from the Schibano Pharma Group to capture the “wellness market of the future”: delivering treatments by CBD oils in saunas and steam baths for its calming, antispasmodic, and anti-inflammatory properties.

In the U.K., luxury CBD brand OTO (backed by supermodels Adwoa Aboah and Jodie Kidd) raised £2.65 million EUR in 12 hours via a crowdfunder, enabling it to direct its massage oils, sleep aids and skincare treatments to each Harrods, Selfridges, and Mandarin Oriental hotels. As its founder James Bagley aspires,  “We are on a mission to become the LVMH of CBD.”

The wellness economy is vast, estimated by the Global Wellness Institute (GWI) at $4.5 trillion USD – contrasting with orthodox global health expenditures estimated at $8 trillion USD (World Health Organisation, 2017). McKinsey & Company defines wellness as a consumer category that encompasses “fitness, nutrition, appearance and physical and mental health”, and the company has itself estimated the global wellness market at a $1.5 trillion USD, seeing annual growth of 5%-10%. As consumers rebound after the COVID-19 pandemic, it has been suggested that wellness will increasingly be incorporated into consumers’ daily lives, and that hotels will further direct their efforts into that arena, given that health and wellness are cited as the primary motivation for travellers to use cannabis at a destination.

The case for wellbeing is also being made for ‘Cannabis 3.0’ – so where cannabis 1.0 marked legalization, and 2.0 the introduction of derivatives such as edibles, 3.0 represents the integration of cannabis into mainstream consumer life. As a business proposition, there is particular interest and growth in the CBD and wellness space, with the global market for CBD valued at $9.3 billion USD in 2020, forecast to reach $23.6 billion USD in revenue by 2025, driven by an annual growth rate of 22.2% from 2019-2025. While North America leads the market with a 40% share of the global CBD market, Europe is closing the gap, at 31% with a projected worth of €1.5 billion EUR by 2023. The November 2020 decision by the Court of Justice of the European Union ruling that CBD should not be classified as a narcotic is likewise driving the wellness market, availing its benefits for conditions such as pain relief, relaxation, and relief from inflammation, delivered by a bewildering variety of products from food-oriented gummies and carbonated beverages to capsules, lotions, balms, and sprays and personal care items like massage and bath oils. Hemp seed oil is also a product attracting adherents, by dint of its being rich in omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, and applications as a moisturiser.

“CBD is very appealing to new consumers, especially to consumers who maybe are afraid of something that is psychoactive, or which might show in an employment drug test,” McCann noted. “That makes it a really interesting entry point, and while the regulatory situation around it is still not completely simple, it’s more straightforward than THC. So, we’re starting to see all of the different ways that it can be integrated into people’s lives.”

McCann sees beauty applications as being particularly noteworthy at present. “There’s a lot of applications for CBD in skincare products, from off-the-shelf moisturisers, to more clinically formulated products for issues like inflammation, rosacea, eczema, and psoriasis.” Another factor found through her research was the extent to which consumers are using cannabis to enhance fitness activities, and in products geared towards athletes – whether for increasing enjoyment of sport, or for maintaining focus, or reducing swelling or soreness.

There is an increasing basis of evidence to support such wellness suppositions. New Frontier Data’s report cites that consumers’ experiences with cannabis are overwhelmingly positive, with respondents describing cannabis “as a tool for mindfulness, relaxation, improved sleep, social connection, and active engagement through various physical activities.” In so doing, they adopt cannabis and its derivatives as integral to their personal wellness practices, and incorporate cannabis to complement overall wellness regimens, including specific applications like relief from menstruation pains.

Will CBD prove to be a passing fad that dissipates in favour of the next fashionable flavour of the day, or will it settle foundationally into a long-term market position? “It is trendy right now,” says Molly McCann, who notes how “there are certainly a lot