PubMed: Harnessing Enhanced Flame Retardancy in Rigid Polyurethane Composite Foams through Hemp Seed Oil-Derived Natural Fillers

PubMed: Harnessing Enhanced Flame Retardancy in Rigid Polyurethane Composite Foams through Hemp Seed Oil-Derived Natural Fillers

Polymers (Basel). 2024 Jun 3;16(11):1584. doi: 10.3390/polym16111584.

ABSTRACT

Over the past few decades, polymer composites have received significant interest and become protagonists due to their enhanced properties and wide range of applications. Herein, we examined the impact of filler and flame retardants in hemp seed oil-based rigid polyurethane foam (RPUF) composites’ performance. Firstly, the hemp seed oil (HSO) was converted to a corresponding epoxy analog, followed by a ring-opening reaction to synthesize hemp bio-polyols. The hemp polyol was then reacted with diisocyanate in the presence of commercial polyols and other foaming components to produce RPUF in a single step. In addition, different fillers like microcrystalline cellulose, alkaline lignin, titanium dioxide, and melamine (as a flame retardant) were used in different wt.% ratios to fabricate composite foam. The mechanical characteristics, thermal degradation behavior, cellular morphology, apparent density, flammability, and closed-cell contents of the generated composite foams were examined. An initial screening of different fillers revealed that microcrystalline cellulose significantly improves the mechanical strength up to 318 kPa. The effect of melamine as a flame retardant in composite foam was also examined, which shows the highest compression strength of 447 kPa. Significantly better anti-flaming qualities than those of neat foam based on HSO have been reflected using 22.15 wt.% of melamine, with the lowest burning time of 4.1 s and weight loss of 1.88 wt.%. All the composite foams showed about 90% closed-cell content. The present work illustrates the assembly of a filler-based polyurethane foam composite with anti-flaming properties from bio-based feedstocks with high-performance applications.

PMID:38891530 | DOI:10.3390/polym16111584

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/38891530/?utm_source=Chrome&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=pubmed-2&utm_content=1Ds1JEbG0OWaBdqM3tTUGjkFhFGaOtMecPdpuvzbuubWi6d9Fn&fc=20231022105433&ff=20240619072119&v=2.18.0.post9+e462414 June 19, 2024 10:00 am