PubMed: Cannabidiol Exposure During Gestation Leads to Adverse Cardiac Outcomes Early in Postnatal Life in Male Rat Offspring

PubMed: Cannabidiol Exposure During Gestation Leads to Adverse Cardiac Outcomes Early in Postnatal Life in Male Rat Offspring

Cannabis Cannabinoid Res. 2024 Feb 14. doi: 10.1089/can.2023.0213. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Studies indicate that ∼7% of pregnant individuals in North America consume cannabis in pregnancy. Pre-clinical studies have established that maternal exposure to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC; major psychoactive component in cannabis) leads to fetal growth restriction and impaired cardiac function in offspring. However, the effects of maternal exposure to cannabidiol (CBD; major non-euphoric constituent) on cardiac outcomes in offspring remain unknown. Therefore, our objective is to investigate the functional and underlying molecular impacts in the hearts of offspring exposed to CBD in pregnancy. Methods: Pregnant Wistar rats were exposed to either 3 or 30 mg/kg CBD or vehicle control i.p. daily from gestational day 6 to term. Echocardiography was used to assess cardiac function in male and female offspring at postnatal day (PND) 21. Furthermore, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), immunoblotting, and bulk RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) were performed on PND21 offspring hearts. Results: Despite no differences in the heart-to-body weight ratio, both doses of CBD led to reduced cardiac function exclusively in male offspring at 3 weeks of age. Underlying this, significant alterations in the expression of the endocannabinoid system (ECS; e.g., decreased cannabinoid receptor 2) were observed. In addition, bulk RNA-seq data demonstrated transcriptional pathways significantly enriched in mitochondrial function/metabolism as well as development. Conclusion: Collectively, we demonstrated for the first time that gestational exposure to CBD, a constituent perceived as safe, leads to early sex-specific postnatal cardiac deficits and alterations in the cardiac ECS in offspring.

PMID:38358335 | DOI:10.1089/can.2023.0213

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/38358335/?utm_source=Chrome&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=pubmed-2&utm_content=1Ds1JEbG0OWaBdqM3tTUGjkFhFGaOtMecPdpuvzbuubWi6d9Fn&fc=20231022105433&ff=20240215132240&v=2.18.0 February 15, 2024 11:00 am