PubMed: Cannabinoids improve mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle of exhaustive exercise training rats by inhibiting mitophagy through the Pink1/Parkin and Bnip3 pathways

PubMed: Cannabinoids improve mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle of exhaustive exercise training rats by inhibiting mitophagy through the Pink1/Parkin and Bnip3 pathways

Chem Biol Interact. 2024 Jan 3:110855. doi: 10.1016/j.cbi.2024.110855. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a pure natural phytocannabinoid derived from cannabis that has anti-inflammatory, antiapoptotic and antioxidative stress abilities. In recent years, an increasing number of studies have reported the regulatory effect of CBD on skeletal muscle injury induced by exercise, but its mechanism is still unclear. Mitochondria are the main organelles responsible for the energy supply within eukaryotic cells, and their function has been closely linked to cellular health. Moderate exercise improves mitochondrial function, but the excessive exercise has a negative impact on mitochondria. Therefore, we speculate that CBD may promote exercise induced skeletal muscle cell damage by improving mitochondrial function. In this study, by establishing an animal model of exhaustive exercise training in rats, the effects of CBD on the protective effect of CBD on skeletal muscle mitochondrial structure and function was elaborated, and the possible molecular mechanism was discussed based on transcriptomics. Our results indicate that skeletal muscle mitochondrial structure and function were improved after CBD intervention. GO and KEGG pathway enrichment analysis showed that exhaustive exercise training induced mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle is associated with excessive autophagy/mitophagy, the signaling pathways involved in FOXO3 and GABARAPL1 may play important roles. After CBD intervention, the protein expression of Pink1, Parkin and Bnip3 was down-regulated, indicating that CBD may improve the mitochondrial function by inhibiting mitophagy through the Pink1/Parkin and Bnip3 pathway.

PMID:38182033 | DOI:10.1016/j.cbi.2024.110855

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/38182033/?utm_source=Chrome&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=pubmed-2&utm_content=1Ds1JEbG0OWaBdqM3tTUGjkFhFGaOtMecPdpuvzbuubWi6d9Fn&fc=20231022105433&ff=20240106112146&v=2.18.0 January 5, 2024 11:00 am