PubMed: Effects of Cannabidiol, 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol, and WIN 55-212-22 on the Viability of Canine and Human Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Cell Lines

PubMed: Effects of Cannabidiol, 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol, and WIN 55-212-22 on the Viability of Canine and Human Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Cell Lines

Biomolecules. 2024 Apr 19;14(4):495. doi: 10.3390/biom14040495.

ABSTRACT

In our previous study, we demonstrated the impact of overexpression of CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors and the inhibitory effect of endocannabinoids (2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and Anandamide (AEA)) on canine (Canis lupus familiaris) and human (Homo sapiens) non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) cell lines’ viability compared to cells treated with a vehicle. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the anti-cancer effects of the phytocannabinoids, cannabidiol (CBD) and ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and the synthetic cannabinoid WIN 55-212-22 (WIN) in canine and human lymphoma cell lines and to compare their inhibitory effect to that of endocannabinoids. We used malignant canine B-cell lymphoma (BCL) (1771 and CLB-L1) and T-cell lymphoma (TCL) (CL-1) cell lines, and human BCL cell line (RAMOS). Our cell viability assay results demonstrated, compared to the controls, a biphasic effect (concentration range from 0.5 μM to 50 μM) with a significant reduction in cancer viability for both phytocannabinoids and the synthetic cannabinoid. However, the decrease in cell viability in the TCL CL-1 line was limited to CBD. The results of the biochemical analysis using the 1771 BCL cell line revealed a significant increase in markers of oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis, and a decrease in markers of mitochondrial function in cells treated with the exogenous cannabinoids compared to the control. Based on the IC50 values, CBD was the most potent phytocannabinoid in reducing lymphoma cell viability in 1771, Ramos, and CL-1. Previously, we demonstrated the endocannabinoid AEA to be more potent than 2-AG. Our study suggests that future studies should use CBD and AEA for further cannabinoid testing as they might reduce tumor burden in malignant NHL of canines and humans.

PMID:38672512 | DOI:10.3390/biom14040495

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/38672512/?utm_source=Chrome&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=pubmed-2&utm_content=1Ds1JEbG0OWaBdqM3tTUGjkFhFGaOtMecPdpuvzbuubWi6d9Fn&fc=20231022105433&ff=20240427102433&v=2.18.0.post9+e462414 April 27, 2024 10:00 am