PubMed: Perceptions of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Surgeons About Medical Cannabidiol Use: A Survey Study

PubMed: Perceptions of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Surgeons About Medical Cannabidiol Use: A Survey Study

Cureus. 2024 Jan 6;16(1):e51759. doi: 10.7759/cureus.51759. eCollection 2024 Jan.

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Multiple studies exist identifying cannabidiol (CBD) as an effective part of an orthopaedic patient’s pain regimen; however, there is a paucity of studies elucidating orthopaedic surgeons’ perception of the use and prescription of CBD in the medical setting. This study surveys orthopaedic sports medicine surgeons about their previous education on and current perceptions and usage of CBD in their medical practice.

METHODS: Between April 2023 and July 2023, orthopaedic sports medicine surgeons from across the country were surveyed. This survey was designed in hopes of identifying physician perceptions and current use of CBD as well as their previous education and training on its use.

RESULTS: Overall, 75 orthopaedic surgeons responded. More than three-fourths of responders had not received formal education on medical CBD use, nor did they have partners or colleagues who used CBD in their practice. More than half of all surgeons believed that there is a stigma associated with CBD use. A higher proportion of surgeons from CBD legal states recommended CBD to help patients control their pain (53.7% vs. 37.5%). Less than 15% of responders believed that CBD can adversely affect surgical outcomes. Finally, four-fifths of all responders believed that CBD is easy to legally access and affordable to buy by patients who desire it.

DISCUSSION: The relative novelty of CBD inclusion in medicine has led to a lack of early education and overall experience with its use among orthopaedic sports medicine surgeons. Still, surgeons believe that CBD is a safe and effective option to control pain. As surgeons continue to gain more familiarity and trust with CBD’s medical uses over time, it has the potential to be a mainstay in orthopaedic multimodal pain regimens.

PMID:38318555 | PMC:PMC10843240 | DOI:10.7759/cureus.51759

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/38318555/?utm_source=Chrome&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=pubmed-2&utm_content=1Ds1JEbG0OWaBdqM3tTUGjkFhFGaOtMecPdpuvzbuubWi6d9Fn&fc=20231022105433&ff=20240206072106&v=2.18.0 February 6, 2024 11:00 am