PubMed: Subjective, behavioral and neurobiological effects of cannabis and cannabinoids in social anxiety

PubMed: Subjective, behavioral and neurobiological effects of cannabis and cannabinoids in social anxiety

Rev Neurosci. 2023 Oct 11. doi: 10.1515/revneuro-2023-0078. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a debilitating disorder, characterized by fear and anxiety in social situations. Evidence suggests that the levels of SAD are rising, in particularly after the COVID-19 pandemic. Serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors and cognitive-behavioral therapy are effective treatments for SAD. Nevertheless, a significant number of patients do not respond well to these therapeutic options. During the last years, Cannabis and cannabinoid-containing products have been investigated for the treatment of different neuropsychiatric disorders. Nevertheless, their efficacy for the treatment of anxiety disorders is still a matter of debate. The purpose of this review was to investigate subjective, behavioral, and neurobiological effects of Cannabis and cannabinoids in social anxiety and SAD. A search in the PubMed database for articles published between the years of 2003-2023 was conducted. One hundred and seventeen (117) original studies were identified. After the exclusion criteria, eighteen (18) studies were selected. The studies investigated the effects of the cannabinoids Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) in patients or healthy volunteers submitted to tasks that assessed social anxiety. Results showed that CBD decreases social anxiety, producing an inverted U-shaped curve, with anxiety measurements being reduced at intermediate doses administered orally (300-600 mg), but not at lower or higher doses. THC either reduces (lower doses, 6-7.5 mg) or increases (higher doses) social anxiety measurements. CBD attenuates the anxiogenic effects of THC. The effects of THC and CBD in anxiety are associated to the modulation of fronto-limbic regions. Further clinical trials, conducted with male and female patients and larger cohorts are still necessary to consolidate these results.

PMID:37812748 | DOI:10.1515/revneuro-2023-0078

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/37812748/?utm_source=Chrome&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=pubmed-2&utm_content=1NqsX9BbHlDygQ8TcgAlJilHgPpiuKQtyIr–a3-xbLzPoB9xM&fc=20220928170152&ff=20231009190606&v=2.17.9.post6+86293ac October 9, 2023 10:00 am