PubMed: Physician Perceptions of Cannabidiol (CBD) and Cannabis in Sports Medicine and Performance

PubMed: Physician Perceptions of Cannabidiol (CBD) and Cannabis in Sports Medicine and Performance

Transl Sports Med. 2023 Dec 11;2023:8824466. doi: 10.1155/2023/8824466. eCollection 2023.

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: There is growing evidence regarding cannabinoid use in sports medicine and performance, especially cannabidiol (CBD). This study aims to determine if sports medicine physicians are recommending cannabinoids for therapeutic purposes, as well as analyze perceptions of cannabinoids within sports medicine and performance.

METHODS: Physician members of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) completed an anonymous survey on demographics, CBD and Cannabis recommendations, as well as attitudes toward cannabinoid products within sports medicine. Factors associated with CBD and cannabis recommendations as well as perceptual differences were found using multivariate regression modelling.

RESULTS: Responses from 333 physicians were recorded. The following groups were less likely to agree with allowing cannabis for recreational purposes: female gender (coeff. = 0.79 (0.33-1.25), p=0.001), increasing age (coeff. = 0.04 (0.02, 0.07), p < 0.001), and rural respondents (compared to baseline urban, coeff. = 1.16 (0.36, 1.95), p=0.004). Similarly, these three factors were associated with a higher likelihood of disagreeing with WADA removing cannabis from the prohibited substance list and with the NCAA allowing CBD use by collegiate athletes (p ≤ 0.045). CBD was less likely to be recommended by pediatricians, rural physicians, and academic physicians (p ≤ 0.030). Male physicians and younger physicians were less likely to identify cannabis as performance-enhancing (p ≤ 0.042).

CONCLUSIONS: Sports medicine physicians have varying views on cannabinoids. While sports medicine physicians generally have favorable attitudes toward CBD and cannabis, these perceptions appear to be significantly affected by age, practice type, and gender.

PMID:38654915 | PMC:PMC11022760 | DOI:10.1155/2023/8824466

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/38654915/?utm_source=Chrome&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=pubmed-2&utm_content=1Ds1JEbG0OWaBdqM3tTUGjkFhFGaOtMecPdpuvzbuubWi6d9Fn&fc=20231022105433&ff=20240424142106&v=2.18.0.post9+e462414 April 24, 2024 10:00 am